WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

Lettuce price Australia: Popular vegetable soars by 2,300 per cent

Cafes and restaurants face potential demise as the cost of commodities like green beans rises from $1 per pound in the marketplace to a budget-boosting $240 for a 10kg tray.

That equates to a 2,300 percent increase, with the price of beans rising from $1 per pound wholesale to $24 per pound.

And insiders warn that things are about to get worse as the price of grain skyrockets over the war in Ukraine – which could send the price of meat and dairy skyrocketing.

The price of eggs is already starting to rise as chicken farmers pass on the costs of increased feed prices, while rising fuel costs will affect a whole range of foodstuffs.

Now chefs and cafe owners struggle to rewrite their recipes in an effort to survive as everyday necessities disappear from shelves or cost too much to be viable.

Cafes and restaurants face potential demise as the cost of commodities like green beans rises from $1 per pound in the marketplace to a budget-boosting $240 for a 10kg tray.

Cafes and restaurants face potential demise as the cost of commodities like green beans rises from $1 per pound in the marketplace to a budget-boosting $240 for a 10kg tray.

“Now that everything is on the rise, we can’t find things to put on the menu,” admitted Vicky Vardis, the owner of the ship’s restaurant in Sydney’s glitzy Barangaroo business district.

“I annoy the cooks so they do meals at the lowest possible cost.”

Vegetable market prices have hit record highs in the wake of the floods that devastated NSW and Queensland farmlands, flooded crops and washed away topsoil.

Official government data shows how green bean prices rose exponentially in three months, rising 400 percent week-over-week at one point.

“Normally we would pay less than $10 for 10 pounds of green beans,” said Ms. Vardis. “But we had to pay $240 in the market today.

“And it’s even worse in the stores — I went to Harris Farm Markets the other day and they were asking $40 a kilogram.

“I am very concerned – not only for the company, but also for the global economy. A lot is happening right now.

‘I don’t know what the solution is. We don’t know what will happen overnight.’

Chefs and cafe owners struggle to rewrite their recipes in an effort to survive as everyday necessities disappear from shelves or cost too much to be viable

Chefs and cafe owners struggle to rewrite their recipes in an effort to survive as everyday necessities disappear from shelves or cost too much to be viable

Melbourne’s Brick Lane cafe in the city’s famous alleyways has had to raise prices three times as many in months to keep up with rising costs.

“It cuts across the entire supply chain – meat, vegetables, fruit… and with fuel prices rising, that’s just increasing the bill,” said manager Lindsay, who declined to give his last name.

‘It affects the customers mainly because we keep pushing prices up – but in the end you can only pay so much for something that it becomes ridiculous.

“You can ruin your recipes by switching ingredients, you can clean up some of the food, you can make smaller meals out of it — you can do all those kinds of things.

“But the customer is the one who hurts, whichever way you go, whether it’s increasing the price or decreasing the quality, going for cheaper ingredients or changing the recipes.

“It all comes back to the customer. They are the ones who hurt.’

Green bean price gains are even outpacing the cost of iceberg lettuce, which also hit record highs, with the price tripling week-over-week to $12 apiece in late May.

In fact, price increases for green beans and broccoli are outpacing the cost of iceberg lettuce, which hit record highs when the going price tripled week over week to $12 a head in late May.

In fact, price increases for green beans and broccoli are outpacing the cost of iceberg lettuce, which hit record highs when the going price tripled week over week to $12 a head in late May.

Broccoli prices also exploded, rising 350 percent according to the latest government figures.

And more pain is on the way.

“Egg suppliers have increased the price of their eggs, mainly as a result of a sharp rise in grain prices for feeding the birds,” warned market specialist Sydney Fresh.

“It is possible that there will be more increases. The international supply of grain is a worldwide problem, largely because of the situation in Russia/Ukraine.’

Grain is also used to feed cattle and pigs, which will now impact meat and milk prices in the coming weeks, driving up the cost of even the humble bacon and spring rolls.

Leek is almost impossible to find in markets or shops as the food crisis reaches new levels

Zucchini are also becoming rarer or just too expensive to buy

Snow peas, cabbage, leeks, zucchini, cucumber and cauliflower are rising to new heights – if you can get them at all – and onions are on their way up too

Snow peas, cabbage, leeks, zucchini, cucumber and cauliflower are also rising to new heights — if you can get them at all — and onions are on their way up too.

Herbs and salads like arugula are also desperately scarce and expensive.

‘The floods in NSW a month or so ago are still impacting the supply of herbs and leafy vegetables,’ added Sydney Fresh.

‘The more recent severe declines in QLD have made many vegetables very scarce, such as broccoli and iceberg lettuce.’

But Sydney Fresh offers some hope for the future: ‘The supply problems are temporary and will hopefully ease in the coming weeks.’

WHAT TO BUY…

While some vegetables are desperately scarce, there are some that are plentiful, and there are even some bargains to grab right now.

avocados

Hass avocados are dirt cheap and excellent quality right now — swap your bacon and eggs for avo on toast on weekends.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Hated by kids, but now great value for money, so pick them up – cut them in half and fry them with some bacon or roast them in an airfryer.

CAPSICUMS

Prices rose a few weeks ago, but are now back to normal.

ROOTS

Tasmanian carrots are now in stock and very tender and sweet – store them in a plastic bag to keep them fresh in the fridge and prevent them from going limp.

PUMPKIN

Top quality at the moment and fantastic value.

POTATOES

New season varieties are all excellent at the moment.

CITRUS FRUIT

Lemons, limes, mandarins, tangelos and navel oranges are all in season and good quality with good stocks

BANANAS, PEARS, PINEAPPLE

Top value, great taste and plentiful?

This website uses cookies to improve your experience. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. Accept Read More