Les Moonves promised the accuser a job from CBS and was days away from quitting with $ 90M when he was fired

Pay to Play: The New York Times reports that Les Moonves told lawyers who investigate allegations of sexual misconduct that he tried to get a job for the accuser on CBS (Moonves up in 2010)

Les Moonves was in the process of finding one of his accusers a job on CBS before his dismissal.

The New York Times reports that Moonves admitted this while being interviewed by company lawyers as part of the investigation into his alleged sexual misconduct last month.

The CBS board realized after they learned they needed to get Moonves out of their position according to emails that were seen by the Times, but were still willing to let him leave with half of his $ 180 million compensation package .

An agreement was reached that would pay Moonves the rest of the money if an investigation authorized it, and a new statement was being written announcing that the decision was being drafted when The New Yorker called the event to verify a story that contained accusations in the file. . of six new women.

The board realized at the time that there was no way to let Moonves leave with money until the investigation was completed, and he voted to end his job on Sunday, a few hours after The New Yorker published his story.

Some hoped that the vote could have come before the story was launched, but there was not enough time.

Pay to Play: The New York Times reports that Les Moonves told lawyers who investigate allegations of sexual misconduct that he tried to get a job for the accuser on CBS (Moonves up in 2010)

Pay to Play: The New York Times reports that Les Moonves told lawyers who investigate allegations of sexual misconduct that he tried to get a job for the accuser on CBS (Moonves up in 2010)

Phyllis Golden-Gottlieb

Phyllis Golden-Gottlieb

Illeana Douglas

Illeana Douglas

Accusers: the company learned that a story could be in process in January, when Shari Redstone transmitted the information she had heard to the board (Phyllis Golden-Gottlieb on the left, Illeana Douglas on the right)

The Times also reports that no matter what the investigation finds, board members have said that "almost certainly" Moonves will not receive money from the company.

The board was upset not only by the history of The New Yorker, but also by "new incriminating details of their lawyers."

Many on the board had been ready to expel Moonves long before that, especially Shari Redstone.

But Moonves had managed to win several board members by rejecting the claims made in the first New Yorker story and claiming he sexually assaulted a woman in the 1980s, who was later revealed to be Phyllis Golden-Gottlieb.

Redstone was actually the first to reveal that a story could be up and running, sharing this news with the company in January.

When a February story focused on President Trump and not on Moonves, some on the company's board thought they were off the hook.

That was not the case.

A presentation submitted by CBS to the United States Securities and Exchange Committee obtained by DailyMail.com on Monday revealed that Moonves would stay for two years to help advise the company in order to ensure a smooth transition.

That presentation also revealed that in his position Moonves would receive his own office and a security detail, paid for by CBS.

CBS will also place $ 120 million in a trust that will be awarded to Moonves pending the outcome of two investigations into these allegations.

And the $ 20 million that Moonves allegedly donated to several #MeToo charities is actually coming out of the pocket of CBS Corporation.

– Sir. Moonves agreed to perform transitional advisory services for the Company for one year after his resignation (or, if prior, until the date on which the Board determines that the Company has the right to terminate his employment for cause) in order to provide smooth transition of your duties, & # 39; reads the presentation.

"In order to facilitate such transition services, the Company will provide Mr. Moonves with office services and security services for up to two years after his resignation."

The presentation also reviews Moonves' compensation package, though it does not go into detail about how it might be affected by the investigations, other than whether it is authorized to receive the full amount owed to it under its contract.

"Within thirty (30) days after the Completion Date, the Company will also contribute $ 120,000,000 to a granting trust," he says.

"In the event that the Board determines that the Company has the right to terminate Mr. Moonves's employment for just cause under his contract of employment and Mr. Moonves does not require arbitration with respect to such determination, the assets of the trust of grantor will be distributed to the Company and the Company will have no further obligations to Mr. Moonves & # 39;

Just before that, the company reveals that they will cover the charitable donation.

Within thirty (30) days after the Completion Date, the Company will make contributions for a total amount of $ 20,000,000 to one or more charitable organizations that support the #MeToo movement and equality for women in the workplace, organizations that have been designated by Mr. Moonves in consultation with the Company ", declares the presentation.

That line seems to contradict the statement made a day earlier by the company in a press release.

"Moonves and CBS will donate $ 20 million to one or more organizations that support the #MeToo movement and equality for women in the workplace," the statement said.

"The donation, which will be made immediately, has been deducted from the severance benefits that may be due to Moonves after the ongoing independent investigation conducted by Covington & Burling and Debevoise & Plimpton."

The departure of Moonves as CEO managed to resolve at least one legal headache for the corporation in its current battle with National Amusements, its largest shareholder.

The beleaguered CBS boss had tried to stop Shari Redstone's attempt to merge CBS with another company in which National Amusements is the controlling shareholder, Viacom.

A National Amusements representative has long disputed the idea that Redstone would once try to push for an unwanted merger, a claim that was confirmed on Monday with filing with the SEC.

"As part of the agreement, NAI confirmed that it has withdrawn its proposed merger of CBS and Viacom and that it has no current plans to propose such a transaction," read the documents filed by CBS.

However, those talks could be reopened in two years by National Amusements, or earlier by Viacom or the board of directors of CBS if they believe it is in the best interest of the company.

"CBS is an organization of talented and dedicated people who have created one of the most successful media companies in the world," Redstone said Sunday.

"Today's resolution will benefit all shareholders, allowing us to focus on the business of running CBS and transforming it into the future." We trust Joe's ability to serve as acting CEO and we are pleased to welcome our new directors, who bring a valuable and diverse experience and a strong commitment to corporate governance. "

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