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Leger wanted to admit his very first female green beret as she neared the completion of the many-year course

Army will admit its very first ever feminine green beret that has almost completed the debilitating year-long course of the Special Forces unit

  • Unidentified female soldier employed by the National Guard of the United States
  • The woman is about to complete the qualification course for the whole year – or “Q course”
  • To get into Q Course, she passed the debilitating, 24-day assessment program
  • Assessment program tests soldiers’ skills such as navigation, marching with equipment

The Special Forces of the US Army is about to admit its very first female Green Beret.

The woman, a soldier on duty in the National Guard, is reportedly in the final stages of the training. She is just a few weeks away from completing the mandatory year-long qualification course – also known as Q Course.

Once she’s done, she becomes a Special Serces engineer sergeant, according to The New York Times.

Although the soldier has not completed the required courses, she is at a far enough stage that, according to The Times, graduation is almost a done deal.

Members of the Special Forces of the US Army, also known as the Green Berets, can be seen above at the John War Kennedy Special Warfare Center and the American School in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in January 2020

Members of the Special Forces of the US Army, also known as the Green Berets, can be seen above at the John War Kennedy Special Warfare Center and the American School in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in January 2020

DailyMail.com has contacted the military to comment on the identity of the woman.

Several women have passed the 24-day assessment program, which is a condition for being able to follow the qualification course.

The program is a debilitating test of skills that are essential for every elite troop soldier, including land navigation, marching with heavy equipment and other physical and psychological fitness criteria.

The three-week test process, known as the Special Forces Assessment and Selection (SFAS), usually causes about 15 percent of the prospective interns to drop out.

After completing the assessment program, soldiers are evaluated by Special Forces supervisors, who then have to decide if they want to enter the qualification course.

At least one other woman, a medical sergeant, is also in the qualification course, according to the Times.

Soldiers who complete the qualification course must then complete the program, although its length varies depending on the specific task within the army.

The green berets are a unit of which the soldiers occupy different positions and specialties, including intelligence and operations, weapons, medical, technology and communication.

Green berets are often at the forefront of combat. Their troops do everything from “soft power” missions, including inoculating children and building relationships with local leaders, to actual fighting.

In 2016, Kristen M. Griest became the first female infantry officer after completing the demanding Ranger school. She can be seen above in August 2015 at the Ranger School in Fort Benning, Georgia

In 2016, Kristen M. Griest became the first female infantry officer after completing the demanding Ranger school. She can be seen above in August 2015 at the Ranger School in Fort Benning, Georgia

In 2016, Kristen M. Griest became the first female infantry officer after completing the demanding Ranger school. She can be seen above in August 2015 at the Ranger School in Fort Benning, Georgia

The army sends the green berets to enter into relationships with local forces and soldiers who need equipment and training, usually for emergency relief operations.

Since the United States launched military actions after September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the Green Berets, have played an active role in various theaters.

The green berets are also among the last outposts in the army that have no women.

Of the estimated 65,000 women who have been enlisted in the army, more than 700 have been authorized to take up combat roles that were previously limited to men.

In 2017, a woman made history by becoming the first woman to be admitted to the 75th Army Ranger Regiment, a special unit for special infantry units that is part of the Special Operations Command Army.

The year before, Captain Kristen M. Griest became the first female infantry officer after completing his Ranger school – one of the most difficult in the army.

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