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Launceston lesbian Jess Hoyle may take female-only drag show case to High Court 

No penises, please: Lesbian who wants to ban trans women and men from her public parties comes under fire – but she fires back: ‘It’s humiliating to hear that someone with ad**k has to be there’

  • Lesbian in legal battle to host gay events, excluding men and trans women
  • Launceston Wife Jess Hoyle Says Biological Women Need Their Own Events
  • Anti-Discrimination Commissioner Stopped Jess Hoyle’s Only Lesbian Events
  • Case now before the Tasmanian tribunal and Ms Hoyle prepared to go to the Supreme Court

A lesbian who wants to ban anyone with “penises” from attending her drag events has vowed to take her fight against the anti-discrimination watchdog to the Supreme Court.

Jess Hoyle only wants to host lesbian drag nights in her Tasmanian hometown of Launceston, but would refuse to welcome transgender women or men.

The state’s anti-discrimination commissioner intervened when Ms. Hoyle asked for an exemption, saying there was a “significant risk” of her breaking the law.

Ms Hoyle, 34, said it is important that lesbian women have their own spaces and that gay men do the same.

“There were queer events but they were mixed and many lesbians didn’t like going there because it was a breeding ground for straight men,” she told the Daily Mail Australia.

“Because of the self-ID laws, we have to include biological men who think they could be something else and that’s really not that fair. It was not safe for women of the same sex.

“Lesbians have lost all their spaces.”

Jess Hoyle only wants to hold lesbian drag nights in her Tasmanian hometown of Launceston, but would refuse to welcome transgender women or men

Jess Hoyle only wants to hold lesbian drag nights in her Tasmanian hometown of Launceston, but would refuse to welcome transgender women or men

In denying the exemption, Tasmanian Anti-Discrimination Commissioner Sarah Bolt argued that it would be “offensive, humiliating, harassing, insulting” to ask people to prove they were biologically female.

Ms Bolt felt Ms Hoyle’s application went beyond other state exemptions by “requiring people to provide confidential information about their bodies in order to access the proposed events.”

Ms Hoyle rejected the Commissioner’s arguments.

“I actually find it humiliating when lesbians are told to record someone with ad**k,” she said.

“If he wants to be transgender, that’s fine, that’s okay. But in the end, trans women are trans women, in other words: they are men.’

She denied that she would look in pants to find out who the trans women were.

“You can see it just by looking at it. You can hear their voice by the way they walk, you can look at their hips and know it’s a man,” she said.

“We are programmed to seek biological sex, we are not programmed to seek made-up gender identities.

‘LGB is attracted to gays. Why would I want a guy? They can have their events, I can have mine.

‘Why should we be thrown out of who we are? If you’re trans, good for you, but don’t force it on me.’

Trans advocacy group Transforming Tasmania argues that Ms Hoyle’s proposed events are discriminatory, as they deny the existence of trans women.

Ms Hoyle’s case is before the Tasmanian Civil and Administrative Tribunal, which has a deadline in November to reach a decision.

Anna Kerr of the Feminist Legal Clinic, who represents Ms. Hoyle, said the tribunal could rule that lesbians are a disadvantaged group that benefits from discriminating against biological men.

However, it could also show that Tasmania’s laws do not comply with Commonwealth sex discrimination laws, but that would have to be proven by the Supreme Court.

“This could be another test case for this important question,” Ms Kerr told the Daily Telegraph.

If the verdict doesn’t go her way, Ms. Hoyle is willing to take the case to the Supreme Court and has already raised $3,000 in legal fees.

Ms Hoyle (pictured left) at a protest against trans women participating in female sporting events

Ms Hoyle (pictured left) at a protest against trans women participating in female sporting events

“This is not about hate, this is about sitting down and having a conversation about what our rights are, what are fundamental rights and fundamental demands,” she said.

“What I see are the demands of biological men to want to get into lesbian spaces and lesbian dating apps and gaslight a majority of gay women.

“It’s not good and we need to set up spaces that are suitable for trans and gender diversity.

“That means they have their own dating apps, their own spaces, and their own events.”

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