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A surprising aerial-aerial photograph shows a B17 Flying Fortress bomber upside down with one of its wings torn off while it falls to the ground. The doomed ten-person crew still seemed on board and seconds after death. The images were discovered in the personal affairs of the late Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper who served in North Africa and Italy. The pilot of the reconnaissance corps, who was born in 1916 in Notting Hill, West London, took countless dramatic photos during the conflict that was in his hands after the war.

Remarkable photos of aerial combat during World War II have been revealed – including a moving photo of the final moments of a doomed allied bomber.

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The images were discovered in the personal affairs of the late Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper who served in North Africa and Italy.

The pilot of the Reconnaissance Corps, who was born in 1916 in Notting Hill, West London, took numerous dramatic photos during the conflict that was in his hands after the war.

A surprising aerial-aerial photograph shows a B17 Flying Fortress bomber upside down with one of its wings torn off while it falls to the ground. The doomed ten-person crew still seemed on board and seconds after death.

A surprising aerial-aerial photograph shows a B17 Flying Fortress bomber upside down with one of its wings torn off while it falls to the ground. The doomed ten-person crew still seemed on board and seconds after death. The images were discovered in the personal affairs of the late Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper who served in North Africa and Italy. The pilot of the reconnaissance corps, who was born in 1916 in Notting Hill, West London, took countless dramatic photos during the conflict that was in his hands after the war.

A surprising aerial-aerial photograph shows a B17 Flying Fortress bomber upside down with one of its wings torn off while it falls to the ground. The doomed ten-person crew still seemed on board and seconds after death. The images were discovered in the personal affairs of the late Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper who served in North Africa and Italy. The pilot of the reconnaissance corps, who was born in 1916 in Notting Hill, West London, took countless dramatic photos during the conflict that was in his hands after the war.

Another image shows a bombing of a German refinery in Ploesti in Romania - a huge complex of facilities about 30 miles north of Bucharest. The raid was part of an air raid on nine oil refineries in the area on August 1, 1943. It was a strategic target whose destroyed allies hoped that Germany would do a heavy blow to Germany's ability to continue the war. The bombing was largely carried out by the US Air Force in Libya and southern Italy. Fifty-three planes, each with a crew of ten, were lost in the attack - which did not drastically affect oil production in the area

Another image shows a bombing of a German refinery in Ploesti in Romania - a huge complex of facilities about 30 miles north of Bucharest. The raid was part of an air raid on nine oil refineries in the area on August 1, 1943. It was a strategic target whose destroyed allies hoped that Germany would do a heavy blow to Germany's ability to continue the war. The bombing was largely carried out by the US Air Force in Libya and southern Italy. Fifty-three planes, each with a crew of ten, were lost in the attack - which did not drastically affect oil production in the area

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Another image shows a bombing of a German refinery in Ploesti in Romania – a huge complex of facilities about 30 miles north of Bucharest. The raid was part of an air raid on nine oil refineries in the area on August 1, 1943. It was a strategic target whose destroyed allies hoped that Germany would do a heavy blow to Germany's ability to continue the war. The bombing was largely carried out by the US Air Force in Libya and southern Italy. Fifty-three planes, each with a crew of ten, were lost in the attack – which did not drastically affect oil production in the area

An image entitled & # 39; a wing and a prayer & # 39 ;, shows another war-damaged bomber almost cut in half with a gaping hole in the side, but still somehow in the air. The aircraft finally landed safely, despite the collision with a Messerschmitt Bf 109 - a German WWII fighter aircraft that, along with the Focke-Wulf Fw 190, was considered the backbone of the Luftwaffe's hunting force.

An image entitled & # 39; a wing and a prayer & # 39 ;, shows another war-damaged bomber almost cut in half with a gaping hole in the side, but still somehow in the air. The aircraft finally landed safely, despite the collision with a Messerschmitt Bf 109 - a German WWII fighter aircraft that, along with the Focke-Wulf Fw 190, was considered the backbone of the Luftwaffe's hunting force.

An image entitled & # 39; a wing and a prayer & # 39 ;, shows another war-damaged bomber almost cut in half with a gaping hole in the side, but still somehow in the air. The aircraft finally landed safely, despite the collision with a Messerschmitt Bf 109 – a German WWII fighter aircraft that, along with the Focke-Wulf Fw 190, was considered the backbone of the Luftwaffe's hunting force.

There is also an incredible photo of a Hawker Tempest fighter aircraft chasing a German V1 flying bomb before it tries to knock it off course and shoot it. With a top speed of just over 400 km / h, the aircraft was part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force that supported ground operations on a large scale during the D-Day landings on 6 June 1944. The alternating black and white invasion stripes were painted on the fuselage. and wings of all RAF and allied planes before the landings to increase recognition by friendly forces

There is also an incredible photo of a Hawker Tempest fighter aircraft chasing a German V1 flying bomb before it tries to knock it off course and shoot it. With a top speed of just over 400 km / h, the aircraft was part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force that supported ground operations on a large scale during the D-Day landings on 6 June 1944. The alternating black and white invasion stripes were painted on the fuselage. and wings of all RAF and allied planes before the landings to increase recognition by friendly forces

There is also an incredible photo of a Hawker Tempest fighter aircraft chasing a German V1 flying bomb before it tries to knock it off course and shoot it. With a top speed of just over 400 km / h, the aircraft was part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force that supported ground operations on a large scale during the D-Day landings on 6 June 1944. The alternating black and white invasion stripes were painted on the fuselage. and wings of all RAF and allied planes before the landings to increase recognition by friendly forces

Another image shows a B26 bomber flying over Sicily. It may be part of the Allied invasion of Sicily, codenamed Operation Husky, was a major campaign of World War II, during which the Allies took the island of Sicily from the Axis Powers of Italy and Nazi Germany. Operation Husky was the first major allied attack on German-occupied Europe. Churchill described Sicily and Italy as the soft underbelly of Europe, but the campaign in Italy was fought hard and only came to an end in May 1945

Another image shows a B26 bomber flying over Sicily. It may be part of the Allied invasion of Sicily, codenamed Operation Husky, was a major campaign of World War II, during which the Allies took the island of Sicily from the Axis Powers of Italy and Nazi Germany. Operation Husky was the first major allied attack on German-occupied Europe. Churchill described Sicily and Italy as the soft underbelly of Europe, but the campaign in Italy was fought hard and only came to an end in May 1945

Another image shows a B26 bomber flying over Sicily. It may be part of the Allied invasion of Sicily, codenamed Operation Husky, was a major campaign of World War II, during which the Allies took the island of Sicily from the Axis Powers of Italy and Nazi Germany. Operation Husky was the first major allied attack on German-occupied Europe. Churchill described Sicily and Italy as the soft underbelly of Europe, but the campaign in Italy was fought hard and only came to an end in May 1945

Another image shows the results of a bombing of a German refinery in Ploesti in Romania. But B-24 bombers were confronted with some of the most heavily protected facilities that the Germans had. Surrounded by hundreds of anti-aircraft guns, heavy caliber machine guns and defensive aircraft - the bombers could not make the impact they had hoped for
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Another image shows the results of a bombing of a German refinery in Ploesti in Romania. But B-24 bombers were confronted with some of the most heavily protected facilities that the Germans had. Surrounded by hundreds of anti-aircraft guns, heavy caliber machine guns and defensive aircraft - the bombers could not make the impact they had hoped for

Another image shows the results of a bombing of a German refinery in Ploesti in Romania. But B-24 bombers were confronted with some of the most heavily protected facilities that the Germans had. Surrounded by hundreds of anti-aircraft guns, heavy caliber machine guns and defensive aircraft – the bombers could not make the impact they had hoped for

Smoke flows into the air after a bombing raid on a German refinery in Ploesti, Romania. The images were discovered in the personal affairs of the late Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper who served in North Africa and Italy. A box found in Flt Lt Cooper's home in Devon while being cleared after his death also contained his K20 hand camera that he used to take reconnaissance photos, his plot instruments and war medals. The archive went to his cousin, a retired engineer from Devon, who now sells it with Plymouth Auction Rooms

Smoke flows into the air after a bombing raid on a German refinery in Ploesti, Romania. The images were discovered in the personal affairs of the late Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper who served in North Africa and Italy. A box found in Flt Lt Cooper's house in Devon while being cleared after his death also contained his K20 hand camera that he used to take the reconnaissance photos, his plot instruments and war medals. The archive went to his cousin, a retired engineer from Devon, who now sells it with Plymouth Auction Rooms

Smoke flows into the air after a bombing raid on a German refinery in Ploesti, Romania. The images were discovered in the personal affairs of the late Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper who served in North Africa and Italy. A box found in Flt Lt Cooper's house in Devon while being cleared after his death also contained his K20 hand camera that he used to take the reconnaissance photos, his plot instruments and war medals. The archive went to his cousin, a retired engineer from Devon, who now sells it with Plymouth Auction Rooms

Flt Lt Cooper (pictured in Italy) was born in Notting Hill, West London, in 1916 and joined the RAF for cadet training. He was initially assigned to 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing. After the war he left the RAF and established a printing company in Croydon, in the south of London, and moved to Devon after his retirement. He died in 2012 at the age of 96

Flt Lt Cooper (pictured in Italy) was born in Notting Hill, West London, in 1916 and joined the RAF for cadet training. He was initially assigned to 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing. After the war he left the RAF and established a printing company in Croydon, in the south of London, and moved to Devon after his retirement. He died in 2012 at the age of 96

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Flt Lt Cooper (pictured in Italy) was born in Notting Hill, West London, in 1916 and joined the RAF for cadet training. He was initially assigned to 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing. After the war he left the RAF and established a printing company in Croydon, in the south of London, and moved to Devon after his retirement. He died in 2012 at the age of 96

An image entitled & # 39; a wing and a prayer & # 39 ;, shows another war-damaged bomber almost cut in half with a gaping hole in the side, but still somehow in the air.

And there's an incredible photo of a Hawker Tempest fighter plane chasing a German V1 flying bomb before it tries to take it off course and shoot it.

Other photos show the devastation caused by Allied bombing of Monte Cassino and Naples in Italy and there is a dramatic image of Mount Vesuvius during the March 1944 eruption.

Away from the heat of the battle, Flt Lt Cooper photographed an amphitheater, a native belly dancer and a PoW camp in Tunisia.

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A box found in Flt Lt Cooper's house in Devon while being cleared after his death also contained his K20 hand camera that he used to take the reconnaissance photos, his plot instruments and war medals.

The archive went to his cousin, a retired engineer from Devon, who now sells it with Plymouth Auction Rooms.

Another photo shows a Spitfire crash in Africa. A revolutionary aircraft that has transformed the capabilities of the RAF, the Spitfire rightly became a symbol of national rebellion and turned what the darkest hour of Britain could have been into our most beautiful. When it first came into service in 1938, the Spitfire was not only the first all-metal monoplane, but also by far the fastest aircraft in the RAF, which could reach 350 km / h. The Spitfire was in action from the beginning of World War II and shot its first enemy aircraft, two JU88 bombers, at the Firth of Forth on October 16, 1939. When ever more powerful, faster versions were developed, it turned out to be crucial in a large several different theaters, including the successful campaign against General Rommel - the Desert Fox - in North Africa in 1942, the fight against Japan in Burma, the drive through Western Europe after D-Day and the destruction of the German V-weapon sites in France

Another photo shows a Spitfire crash in Africa. A revolutionary aircraft that has transformed the capabilities of the RAF, the Spitfire rightly became a symbol of national rebellion and turned what the darkest hour of Britain could have been into our most beautiful. When it first came into service in 1938, the Spitfire was not only the first all-metal monoplane, but also by far the fastest aircraft in the RAF, which could reach 350 km / h. The Spitfire was in action from the beginning of World War II and shot its first enemy aircraft, two JU88 bombers, at the Firth of Forth on October 16, 1939. When ever more powerful, faster versions were developed, it turned out to be crucial in a large several different theaters, including the successful campaign against General Rommel - the Desert Fox - in North Africa in 1942, the fight against Japan in Burma, the drive through Western Europe after D-Day and the destruction of the German V-weapon sites in France

Another photo shows a Spitfire crash in Africa. A revolutionary aircraft that has transformed the capabilities of the RAF, the Spitfire rightly became a symbol of national rebellion and turned what could have been Britain's darkest hour into our most beautiful. When it first came into service in 1938, the Spitfire was not only the first all-metal monoplane, but also by far the fastest aircraft in the RAF, which could reach 350 km / h. The Spitfire was in action from the beginning of World War II and shot its first enemy aircraft, two JU88 bombers, at the Firth of Forth on October 16, 1939. When ever more powerful, faster versions were developed, it turned out to be crucial in a large several different theaters, including the successful campaign against General Rommel – the Desert Fox – in North Africa in 1942, the fight against Japan in Burma, the drive through Western Europe after D-Day and the destruction of German V-weapon sites in France

Flt Lt Cooper view from a P38 Lightning of a destroyed bridge over the Tiber near Rome. The bombing of Rome in World War II took place several times in 1943 and 1944, mainly by Allies and to a lesser extent by Axis planes, before the city was invaded by the Allies on 4 June 1944.

Flt Lt Cooper view from a P38 Lightning of a destroyed bridge over the Tiber near Rome. The bombing of Rome in World War II took place several times in 1943 and 1944, mainly by Allies and to a lesser extent by Axis planes, before the city was invaded by the Allies on 4 June 1944.

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Flt Lt Cooper view from a P38 Lightning of a destroyed bridge over the Tiber near Rome. The bombing of Rome in World War II took place several times in 1943 and 1944, mainly by Allies and to a lesser extent by Axis planes, before the city was invaded by the Allies on 4 June 1944.

A ruined German train near Rimini on the east coast of Italy. The tide of the war irrevocably turned in favor of the Allies in July 1943 when 150,000 British and American soldiers flooded the shores of Sicily at the start of the bloody Italian campaign of World War II. The Allies marched along the most famous Roman roads, the Appian Way, which connected the city of Rome to the southern Italian coast

A ruined German train near Rimini on the east coast of Italy. The tide of the war irrevocably turned in favor of the Allies in July 1943 when 150,000 British and American soldiers flooded the shores of Sicily at the start of the bloody Italian campaign of World War II. The Allies marched along the most famous Roman roads, the Appian Way, which connected the city of Rome to the southern Italian coast

A ruined German train near Rimini on the east coast of Italy. The tide of the war irrevocably turned in favor of the Allies in July 1943 when 150,000 British and American soldiers flooded the shores of Sicily at the start of the bloody Italian campaign of World War II. The Allies marched along the most famous Roman roads, the Appian Way, which connected the city of Rome to the southern Italian coast

Not all images of Flt Lt Cooper showed devastation. This shows families inspecting boats in Sorrento, Italy. His cousin is now selling the compelling collection at Plymouth Auction Rooms in Devon next week

Not all images of Flt Lt Cooper showed devastation. This shows families inspecting boats in Sorrento, Italy. His cousin is now selling the compelling collection at Plymouth Auction Rooms in Devon next week

Not all images of Flt Lt Cooper showed devastation. This shows families inspecting boats in Sorrento, Italy. His cousin is now selling the compelling collection at Plymouth Auction Rooms in Devon next week

Another image shows kites exploring old Carthage - destroyed in a much earlier war. Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper was initially assigned to 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing - where he collected many of his photos that are now for sale

Another image shows kites exploring old Carthage - destroyed in a much earlier war. Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper was initially assigned to 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing - where he collected many of his photos that are now for sale

Another image shows kites exploring old Carthage – destroyed in a much earlier war. Flight Lieutenant Eric Cooper was initially assigned to 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing – where he collected many of his photos that are now for sale

Another of his images shows Vesuvius in Italy shortly before it erupted again in 1944. The volcano was active from 1913 to 1944, with lava filling the crater and occasionally flowing out of small amounts of lava. The eruption period ended in the great eruption of March 1944, which destroyed the villages of San Sebastiano al Vesuvio, Massa di Somma and Ottaviano, and part of San Giorgio a Cremano

Another of his images shows Vesuvius in Italy shortly before it erupted again in 1944. The volcano was active from 1913 to 1944, with lava filling the crater and occasionally flowing out of small amounts of lava. The eruption period ended in the great eruption of March 1944, which destroyed the villages of San Sebastiano al Vesuvio, Massa di Somma and Ottaviano, and part of San Giorgio a Cremano

Another of his images shows Vesuvius in Italy shortly before it erupted again in 1944. The volcano was active from 1913 to 1944, with lava filling the crater and occasionally flowing out of small amounts of lava. The eruption period ended in the great eruption of March 1944, which destroyed the villages of San Sebastiano al Vesuvio, Massa di Somma and Ottaviano, and part of San Giorgio a Cremano

Flt Lt Cooper was initially assigned 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing (in the photo, the reconnaissance team at work inspecting photos taken during the war)

Flt Lt Cooper was initially assigned 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing (in the photo, the reconnaissance team at work inspecting photos taken during the war)

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Flt Lt Cooper was initially assigned 336 Squadron and was also affiliated with the Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing (in the photo, the reconnaissance team at work inspecting photos taken during the war)

The salesman, who wants to remain anonymous, said: & Eric was a nice guy that I would often visit, but like so many of his generation, he never really spoke about the war. Looking back, I wish I had asked more questions.

& # 39; I know he has served in North Africa and Italy, and there are some amazing photos. You can only wonder about the courage of these men.

& # 39; A special favorite of mine is the photo of a Tempest following a German V1 bomb.

& # 39; They are said to have traveled slowly enough to overtake it, knock it off course and then shoot it.

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& # 39; I inherited his business after my uncle's death, but they are tucked away in a closet.

& # 39; I think it would be great if someone with an interest in the RAF could study the photos. I'm sure they would find them fascinating. & # 39;

There is an incredible photo of a Hawker Tempest fighter plane chasing a German V1 flying bomb before it tries to knock it off course and shoot it. Flt Lt Cooper has marked the bomb on his photo, on which the fighter plane is chasing it (bottom left)

There is an incredible photo of a Hawker Tempest fighter plane chasing a German V1 flying bomb before it tries to knock it off course and shoot it. Flt Lt Cooper has marked the bomb on his photo, on which the fighter plane is chasing it (bottom left)

There is an incredible photo of a Hawker Tempest fighter plane chasing a German V1 flying bomb before it tries to knock it off course and shoot it. Flt Lt Cooper has marked the bomb on his photo, on which the fighter plane is chasing it (bottom left)

Monte Cassino was depicted before it was finally crushed by bombs and grenades. During the monumental four-month battle, the Allies launched four attacks against the Gustav Line in Italy that were being held by Axis forces as they sought the breakthrough to clear the way to Rome. However, the route was blocked by the rugged Monte Cassino massif with its medieval monastery on a hilltop. The Allies were confronted with bare, rocky slopes and inaccessible mountains where German soldiers with machine guns were in place

Monte Cassino was depicted before it was finally crushed by bombs and grenades. During the monumental four-month battle, the Allies launched four attacks against the Gustav Line in Italy that were being held by Axis forces as they sought the breakthrough to clear the way to Rome. However, the route was blocked by the rugged Monte Cassino massif with its medieval monastery on a hilltop. The Allies were confronted with bare, rocky slopes and inaccessible mountains where German soldiers with machine guns were in place

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Monte Cassino was depicted before it was finally crushed by bombs and grenades. During the monumental four-month battle, the Allies launched four attacks against the Gustav Line in Italy that were being held by Axis forces as they sought the breakthrough to clear the way to Rome. However, the route was blocked by the rugged Monte Cassino massif with its medieval monastery on a hilltop. The Allies were confronted with bare, rocky slopes and inaccessible mountains where German soldiers with machine guns were in place

Naples is depicted before Allied bombers arrived. Flt Lt Cooper would make images as part of his reconnaissance work for the troops who arrived in the area. During the war, the Italian city suffered about 200 air strikes by the Allies from 1940 to 1944

Naples is depicted before Allied bombers arrived. Flt Lt Cooper would make images as part of his reconnaissance work for the troops who arrived in the area. During the war, the Italian city suffered about 200 air strikes by the Allies from 1940 to 1944

Naples is depicted before Allied bombers arrived. Flt Lt Cooper would make images as part of his reconnaissance work for the troops who arrived in the area. During the war, the Italian city suffered about 200 air strikes by the Allies from 1940 to 1944

As part of the campaign in North Africa, war graves were created near Tunis. The campaign took place from 10 June 1940 to 13 May 1943 and included visits to the Libyan and Egyptian deserts. Fighting in the area started with the Italian declaration of war on 10 June 1940

As part of the campaign in North Africa, war graves were created near Tunis. The campaign took place from 10 June 1940 to 13 May 1943 and included visits to the Libyan and Egyptian deserts. Fighting in the area started with the Italian declaration of war on 10 June 1940

As part of the campaign in North Africa, war graves were created near Tunis. The campaign took place from 10 June 1940 to 13 May 1943 and included visits to the Libyan and Egyptian deserts. Fighting in the area started with the Italian declaration of war on 10 June 1940

Other photos show the devastation caused by Allied bombing of Monte Cassino and Naples in Italy (photo) and there is a dramatic image of Mount Vesuvius during the March 1944 eruption

Other photos show the devastation caused by Allied bombing of Monte Cassino and Naples in Italy (photo) and there is a dramatic image of Mount Vesuvius during the March 1944 eruption

Other photos show the devastation caused by Allied bombing of Monte Cassino and Naples in Italy (photo) and there is a dramatic image of Mount Vesuvius during the March 1944 eruption

The Allies and Germans agreed that the city of Rome was too important to bomb. But this image shows a first target map of Rome - which would have been used if the bombing had taken place

The Allies and Germans agreed that the city of Rome was too important to bomb. But this image shows a first target map of Rome - which would have been used if the bombing had taken place

The Allies and Germans agreed that the city of Rome was too important to bomb. But this image shows a first target map of Rome – which would have been used if the bombing had taken place

Another image shows the three phases of an Allied landing on the Italian coast. Samen met Canadese, Franse en andere geallieerden was de invasie het begin van een lange mars naar Rome die voor altijd zou worden genoteerd als een van de meest brute van de hele oorlog. Tienduizenden soldaten stierven aan elke kant tijdens de campagne, waarbij de fascistische leider van Italië, Benito Mussolini, in zijn begindagen werd verdreven, maar zich zou uitstrekken tot bijna twee jaar

Een ander beeld toont de drie fasen van een geallieerde landing op de Italiaanse kust. Samen met Canadese, Franse en andere geallieerden was de invasie het begin van een lange mars naar Rome die voor altijd zou worden genoteerd als een van de meest brute van de hele oorlog. Tienduizenden soldaten stierven aan elke kant tijdens de campagne, waarbij de fascistische leider van Italië, Benito Mussolini, in zijn begindagen werd verdreven, maar zich zou uitstrekken tot bijna twee jaar

Een ander beeld toont de drie fasen van een geallieerde landing op de Italiaanse kust. Samen met Canadese, Franse en andere geallieerden was de invasie het begin van een lange mars naar Rome die voor altijd zou worden genoteerd als een van de meest brute van de hele oorlog. Tienduizenden soldaten stierven aan elke kant tijdens de campagne, waarbij de fascistische leider van Italië, Benito Mussolini, in zijn begindagen werd verdreven, maar zich zou uitstrekken tot bijna twee jaar

Een doos die werd gevonden in het huis van Flt Lt Cooper in Devon terwijl deze na zijn dood werd opgeruimd, bevatte ook zijn K20 handheld-camera (foto) die hij gebruikte om de verkenningsfoto's, zijn plotinstrumenten en oorlogsmedailles te maken

Een doos die werd gevonden in het huis van Flt Lt Cooper in Devon terwijl deze na zijn dood werd opgeruimd, bevatte ook zijn K20 handheld-camera (foto) die hij gebruikte om de verkenningsfoto's, zijn plotinstrumenten en oorlogsmedailles te maken

Een doos die werd gevonden in het huis van Flt Lt Cooper in Devon terwijl deze na zijn dood werd opgeruimd, bevatte ook zijn K20 handheld-camera (foto) die hij gebruikte om de verkenningsfoto's, zijn plotinstrumenten en oorlogsmedailles te maken

Flt Lt Cooper werd geboren in Notting Hill, West-Londen, in 1916 en trad toe tot de RAF voor cadettraining.

Hij werd aanvankelijk toegewezen aan 336 Squadron en was ook verbonden aan de Mediterrannean Allied Photo Reconnaissance Wing.

Na de oorlog verliet hij de RAF en richtte hij een drukkerij op in Croydon, in het zuiden van Londen, en verhuisde na zijn pensionering naar Devon.

Hij stierf in 2012 op 96-jarige leeftijd.

Sophie Godfrey, van Plymouth Auction Rooms, zei: 'De verkoper heeft de foto's al een tijdje, maar wil dat het album naar iemand gaat die de geschiedenis ervan zal waarderen.

'Het is een zeer interessante verzameling afbeeldingen en aantrekkelijk om doorheen te kijken.'

De verkoop van het archief, dat naar verwachting £ 500 zal opleveren, vindt plaats op 28 augustus.

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