Large price sharing for houses: they are 60% higher in London, but 41% less in parts of the UK

<pre><pre>Large price sharing for houses: they are 60% higher in London, but 41% less in parts of the UK

House prices in parts of the United Kingdom are lower than before the financial crisis ten years ago.

In a sign that parts of the country have not been rebounded from the credit crisis and the recession that followed, homeowners in Northeast Ireland and Northern Ireland have seen their truth values ​​drop by as much as 41 percent.

In other parts of the country, such as the North West and Scotland, there is hardly any stagnation.

But the Midlands and the South have rebounded strongly – led by a turbo market in London that has seen the average house rock 60 per cent in value.

The gap, exposed in analysis by investment firm Hargreaves Lansdown and revealed today as part of a Mail series that looks back on the crisis, reveals the winners and losers a decade later.

Justin Modray, from the Candid Money advisory group, said: "These numbers really suggest that the country has been split sharply.

& # 39; The bubble in homes is largely created by the disproportionate amount of wealth generated in the city.

The city has not really paid the price of the crisis, and the industries that caused all the damage have largely come away – while the rest of the country has paid for it with cutbacks and taxes. & # 39;

The crisis caused a sharp fall in house prices across the country. But especially in London the market returned and the average house in the capital is £ 476,752.

Prices in the East of England are 40 percent above their pre-crisis peak of £ 292,632 and those in the Southeast are up 36 percent at £ 325,107.

Prices in Northern Ireland have fallen by 41% to £ 132,795, with the average property in the northeast of the country losing 8% of the value of £ 127,271.

The crisis caused a sharp fall in house prices across the country. But especially in London the market returned and the average house in the capital is £ 476,752

The crisis caused a sharp fall in house prices across the country. But especially in London the market returned and the average house in the capital is £ 476,752

The crisis caused a sharp fall in house prices across the country. But especially in London the market returned and the average house in the capital is £ 476,752

Other regions such as Yorkshire and the Humber, the North West, Scotland and Wales have remained virtually static with growth between 5 and 8 percent. A comparable strong gap can be seen in wage growth.

London and the Southeast have seen average wage growth of more than 25 percent since the collapse of Lehman Brothers in September 2008, with wages of £ 41,340 and £ 36,920 respectively, according to figures from Office for National Statistics.

On the other side of the spectrum, wages in the north-west have risen by just over 12 percent to £ 27,924.

It again suggests that the best paid regions in the country have done the best, with other parts left behind by the recovery.

The Bank of England lowered interest rates to a low point after Lehman went bankrupt in an attempt to prevent the total economic collapse, and then flooded the cheap money markets with an unprecedented program to buy government bonds.

Critics have long argued that this raised the trump cards of the rich while leaving warring workers behind, while wage growth was nipped in the bud and the eggs of ordinary savings villages yielded a terrible return on their bank accounts.

How 3,300 bank branches were closed after a crash

More than 3,300 bank branches have been closed since the financial crisis.

Barclays, HSBC, Lloyds and Natwest owner Royal Bank of Scotland had about 8,400 stores at the end of 2008, according to analysis by the Mail. But today there are only about 5,100 open after brutal cuts.

RBS has come the most productive and has cut 1,423 branches or nearly two-thirds of its network.

The bank only survived because of a bailout of £ 46 billion from taxpayers and is still 62.4 percent in the hands of the state.

Lloyds has closed more than 600 branches and split hundreds of others to form TSB.

Major British lenders have also been forced to pay £ 71 billion in fines for misconduct since the crisis hit.

Lloyds suffered the toughest fines with at least £ 23.4 billion in behavioral costs and write-offs since 2008 – largely as a result of compensation for victims of the payment protection insurance scandal.

RBS is next on the list with £ 20.6 billion.

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