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Landscape Solutions director Tim Buckle said he was having a hard time finding staff because of JobSeeker’s payments

A gardener thinks he’s struggling to hire staff because people prefer to pocket JobSeeker benefits rather than work.

Tim Buckle is the director of Landscape Solutions, which employs 700 people across Australia and New Zealand.

He wants to fill 20 jobs in New South Wales alone, but says he cannot find employees due to high JobSeeker payments, news.com.au reported.

Mr Buckle said that it is always difficult to get people to fill the roles in Sydney, but the difficulty has now become ‘next level’.

Tim Buckle (pictured) is the general manager of Landscape Solutions, which employs 700 people across Australia and New Zealand

Tim Buckle (pictured) is the general manager of Landscape Solutions, which employs 700 people across Australia and New Zealand

“We want to expand again now, but we can’t find people to fill the roles,” said Buckle.

“The landscape industry offers wages at the bottom, and the gap between JobSeeker is so small that there is no reason for anyone to go to work.”

Mr. Buckle’s activities saw revenues drop 15 to 20 percent as a result of the pandemic, but were unable to secure JobKeeper funds.

Landscaping Solutions had to cut 25 employees, but since their company returned, they were able to recruit everyone and fill more roles.

Mr. Buckle said that one position – the role of a trading assistant – pays approximately $ 25 an hour, and after tax, there is a $ 200 gap between JobSeeker’s wages and payment.

Mr. Buckle previously said they would get 40 applicants for the position, but now only two or three, which is why he thinks the drop in applicants is due to JobSeeker’s payments.

The business owner isn’t alone in struggling to fill advertised positions.

Jobs such as sales staff, truck drivers, childcare workers, receptionists, managers and nurses are offered.

But employers struggling to find workers have blamed it on a “ lack of applicants ” despite an increase in unemployment after COVID-19, according to data from the National Skills Commission.

In a survey of 5,700 employers with 3,500 vacancies, 44 percent said their biggest problem was a small number of applicants.

“The most cited professions employers have been recruiting since April 7, 2020 include sales associates, truck drivers, childcare workers, receptionists, managers, and registered nurses,” said the NSC report.

“About 30 percent of recruiting employers had (or would expect) to have difficulties filling their vacancies.

Mr. Buckle said that one position - the role of a trading assistant - pays approximately $ 25 an hour, and after tax, there is a $ 200 gap between JobSeeker's wages and payment. Picture: project of Landscaping Solutions

Mr. Buckle said that one position - the role of a trading assistant - pays approximately $ 25 an hour, and after tax, there is a $ 200 gap between JobSeeker's wages and payment. Picture: project of Landscaping Solutions

Mr. Buckle said that one position – the role of a trading assistant – pays approximately $ 25 an hour, and after tax, there is a $ 200 gap between JobSeeker’s wages and payment. Picture: project of Landscaping Solutions

Lack of applicants was the most common reason (cited by 44 percent of employers who have difficulty recruiting), followed by applicants with no experience (27 percent). ‘

This was followed by the ‘location’ of the vacancy and ‘applicants lack technical skills’ (both 20 percent).

In June, the Australian Bureau of Statistics revealed that the unemployment rate is 7.4 percent – up 0.3 percent from the previous month.

The government benefits were introduced at the height of the coronavirus pandemic in Australia.

A Senate investigation earlier this year found that Newstart payments were inadequate and doubled to create the JobSeeker payment.

Mr. Buckle said he understands that $ 270 a week was hard to live on, but he didn’t understand why it doubled for people who were already unemployed when the pandemic hit.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on Tuesday that the coronavirus wage subsidy JobKeeper, which is currently helping 3.5 million Australians, will be reduced in stages as the economy recovers from lockdowns.

Payment will be cut from $ 1,500 to $ 1,200 as of September 27, with a lower payment of $ 750 every two weeks for people who worked less than 20 hours a week in February before the pandemic hit.

Fewer companies qualify because they must continue to demonstrate a 30 percent drop in sales compared to before coronavirus.

Mr Buckle previously said that they would get 40 applicants for this position, but now there are only two or three, which is why he thinks the drop in applicants is due to JobSeeker's payments. Picture: project of Landscaping Solutions

Mr Buckle previously said that they would get 40 applicants for this position, but now there are only two or three, which is why he thinks the drop in applicants is due to JobSeeker's payments. Picture: project of Landscaping Solutions

Mr Buckle previously said that they would get 40 applicants for this position, but now there are only two or three, which is why he thinks the drop in applicants is due to JobSeeker’s payments. Picture: project of Landscaping Solutions

This means that the number of people on JobKeeper is expected to decrease from 3.5 million now to 1.4 million between October and December, treasurer Josh Frydenberg said today.

Meanwhile, the JobSeeker fee is reduced from $ 550 to $ 250, meaning the payment is worth $ 800 every two weeks, rather than $ 1,100 in total.

Mr. Buckle told Daily Mail Australia that he thinks the decrease in JobSeeker benefits would lead to more people applying for jobs in his company,

“I agree in October that we would get more people to apply, but what would we do now and then,” said Buckle.

“The government has come up with a comprehensive solution that should target specific industries.”

He said that during the pandemic, Landscaping Solutions “got lost in the mix.”

“We couldn’t get JobKeeper and JobSeeker prevents us from hiring staff,” he said.

“We compete with companies that have received that advantage. It’s almost like we’re being punished. ‘

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