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Lando Norris was returned to Earth after receiving a three-place grid penalty

Lando Norris is brought back to Earth after Austria’s exploits, while F1 prodigy faces a triple grid penalty for Sunday’s Styrian Grand Prix after not delaying for the yellow flag

  • Lando Norris received a grid penalty of three places on Friday during qualifying
  • Norris received the penalty after not being able to delay for a yellow flag in the practice run
  • The 20-year-old says he is willing to take more risks to make an impact on Formula 1

Lando Norris’ slender shoulders have been re-compared to Lewis Hamilton since he opened the season by becoming the youngest Briton to ever take the podium.

By doing this here on the Red Bull Ring on Sunday, the 20-year-old from Glastonbury by two years overshadowed the old record of the six-time world champion, set for the same team, McLaren, in 2007.

In reality, Norris faces a giant march before even scaling the spurs of Hamilton’s performance. But the younger one followed the older man in a different way on Friday, though not one he would have chosen.

Lando Norris received a three-place grid penalty for not delaying for a yellow flag

Lando Norris received a three-place grid penalty for not delaying for a yellow flag

The penalty brought Norris back to earth after his first podium finish last weekend

The penalty brought Norris back to earth after his first podium finish last weekend

The penalty brought Norris back to earth after his first podium finish last weekend

Norris says he is willing to take more risks on track to replicate last week's success

Norris says he is willing to take more risks on track to replicate last week's success

Norris says he is willing to take more risks on track to replicate last week’s success

Because, just like Hamilton in the qualification for the Grand Prix of Austria a week ago today, Norris failed to slow down for a yellow flag during the first practice. He instead caught up with AlphaTauri’s Pierre Gasly and received a three-place grid penalty tomorrow for the Styrian Grand Prix, on the same track where he finished third.

It was a matter of sobriety with a bump for the cheerful, smiling, popular garage Norris. We heard his natural enthusiasm when he crossed the line last week with a brilliant last lap in qualifying style – the fastest of the race. Out of breath, he shouted, “F *** yes, guys.” Although averse to drinking, he poured champagne over himself, his face mask full of the stuff.

The party afterwards? A Call of Duty computer game in his hotel room – hardly any James Hunt hedonism.

Norris says he asked Lewis Hamilton for advice before mastering the Austrian Grand Prix

Norris says he asked Lewis Hamilton for advice before mastering the Austrian Grand Prix

Norris says he asked Lewis Hamilton for advice before mastering the Austrian Grand Prix

The £ 600,000-a-year driver has been turned in disgust for his life in recent weeks by Hamilton’s announcement of the case against racism. He was one of 13 drivers who took a knee next to his senior mate during race build.

While Hamilton was born without a silver rattle, Norris’ father, Adam, made a fortune of £ 200 million by developing the retirement wing of investment company Hargreaves Lansdown. The boy went to Millfield, a school that produces sporting royalties. His karting career was richly funded, although his academic results were poor: no GCSE to his name.

“I’ve been privileged since I was born,” said Norris Sports emailsipping orange juice in his hotel room. “I am very grateful to my father and my family for doing what I do.

“I find it difficult to know people who have not been treated well. I don’t want to mistreat people. I try to be a normal and nice person.

The £ 600,000 a year driver has admitted to having a privileged upbringing

The £ 600,000 a year driver has admitted to having a privileged upbringing

The £ 600,000 a year driver has admitted to having a privileged upbringing

“I spoke to Lewis before I mastered. I wasn’t sure what to do. I asked if I should go on the left knee or the right. ‘

To live up to his talent, Norris needs to add a little sensible – and maybe a little courage – to his racing.

“I just worked on it in the first half of last year,” he said of his respectable rookie campaign. “I was just thinking about ending the race.

“But even good drivers crash. Max Verstappen. Lewis sometimes. Daniel Ricciardo too. They make mistakes and they are the best in Formula 1. Now I am willing to take more risks and be more aggressive.

Lewis will likely be the leading Briton at Mercedes for a few more years. But it’s great to think that George (Russell, at Williams) and I can be there and inspire the young boys who come in. ‘

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