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The violated American cyclist Lance Armstrong believes it was his & # 39; win-every-cost & # 39; mentality that drove him to use performance-enhancing drugs and admits that he is concerned about that aspect of his personality .
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The violated American cyclist Lance Armstrong believes it was his & # 39; win-every-cost & # 39; mentality that forced him to use performance-enhancing drugs and he admits that he is concerned about that aspect of his return of his personality.

In an interview broadcast on NBC Sports Network after Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Wednesday night, Mike Tirico asked Armstrong if he was being driven to this place & # 39; by that competitive desire to win & # 39; at all costs & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Yes, & # 39; Armstrong said in a clip broadcast on NBC & # 39; s TODAY on Wednesday morning.

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The violated American cyclist Lance Armstrong believes it was his & # 39; win-every-cost & # 39; mentality that drove him to use performance-enhancing drugs and admits that he is concerned about that aspect of his personality .

The violated American cyclist Lance Armstrong believes it was his & # 39; win-every-cost & # 39; mentality that drove him to use performance-enhancing drugs and admits that he is concerned about that aspect of his personality .

In an interview broadcast on NBC Sports Network after Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Wednesday night, Mike Tirico asked Armstrong if he was driven to this place & # 39; that competitive desire to & # 39; at the expense of everything & # 39; to win

In an interview broadcast on NBC Sports Network after Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Wednesday night, Mike Tirico asked Armstrong if he was driven to this place & # 39; that competitive desire to & # 39; at the expense of everything & # 39; to win

In an interview broadcast on NBC Sports Network after Game 2 of the Stanley Cup Finals on Wednesday night, Mike Tirico asked Armstrong if he was driven to this place & # 39; that competitive desire to & # 39; at the expense of everything & # 39; to win

& # 39; You are sometimes afraid that this guy will come back, & # 39; Tirico followed.

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Armstrong did not hesitate: & # 39; Yes, 100 percent. That would not be good. & # 39;

Tirico then asked: & # 39; How do you fight that guy to come back? & # 39;

Amstrong thought a moment before responding.

& # 39; I think I have taken the first step by telling you that I am afraid he may return, & # 39; Armstrong said. & # 39; If I didn't tell you, I think that's a problem.

During the interview, Armstrong insisted that he & # 39; would not change anything & # 39; to the doping which helped him win seven editions of the Tour de France before he was stripped of the titles.

Armstrong returned from cancer to dominate the Tour between 1999 and 2005, but denied fierce allegations of doping until he was clean in an interview with Oprah Winfrey in January 2013, five months after he was banned from cycling
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Armstrong returned from cancer to dominate the Tour between 1999 and 2005, but denied fierce allegations of doping until he was clean in an interview with Oprah Winfrey in January 2013, five months after he was banned from cycling

Armstrong returned from cancer to dominate the Tour between 1999 and 2005, but denied fierce allegations of doping until he was clean in an interview with Oprah Winfrey in January 2013, five months after he was banned from cycling

Armstrong returned from cancer to dominate the Tour between 1999 and 2005, but denied fierce allegations of doping until he was clean in an interview with Oprah Winfrey in January 2013, five months after he was banned from cycling.

In the new interview with NBC Sports, 47-year-old Texan said he was grateful for the lessons he had learned.

& # 39; We did what we had to do to win & # 39 ;, Armstrong said. & # 39; It wasn't legal, but I wouldn't change anything – whether it loses a lot of money, or goes from hero to zero.

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& # 39; It was a mistake, it led to many other mistakes. It led to the most colossal meltdown in the history of sport. But I learned a lot. & # 39;

Armstrong said one of his mistakes was that he was so aggressive about questions about the subject at the time.

& # 39; I couldn't disable it. Big mistake, & he said. & # 39; We would all love to go back in life and have a few doovers.

& # 39; I should never have tackled it, mainly because I knew that most of what they said was true. & # 39;

Armstrong claimed that he could have won without doping if that was not the current culture in sport at that time, comparing someone who did not dope like someone who was heading for a knife fight with a fist.

In the new interview with NBC Sports, 47-year-old Texan said he was grateful for the lessons he had learned. & # 39; We did what we had to do to win & # 39 ;, Armstrong said. & # 39; It wasn't legal, but I wouldn't change anything - whether it loses a lot of money, or goes from hero to zero. & # 39; It was a mistake, it led to many other mistakes. It led to the most colossal meltdown in the history of sport. But I learned a lot & # 39;
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In the new interview with NBC Sports, 47-year-old Texan said he was grateful for the lessons he had learned. & # 39; We did what we had to do to win & # 39 ;, Armstrong said. & # 39; It wasn't legal, but I wouldn't change anything - whether it loses a lot of money, or goes from hero to zero. & # 39; It was a mistake, it led to many other mistakes. It led to the most colossal meltdown in the history of sport. But I learned a lot & # 39;

In the new interview with NBC Sports, 47-year-old Texan said he was grateful for the lessons he had learned. & # 39; We did what we had to do to win & # 39 ;, Armstrong said. & # 39; It wasn't legal, but I wouldn't change anything – whether it loses a lot of money, or goes from hero to zero. & # 39; It was a mistake, it led to many other mistakes. It led to the most colossal meltdown in the history of sport. But I learned a lot & # 39;

& # 39; I wish children from Plano, Texas; Glenwood Springs, Colorado; Brooklyn; Montana … young Americans, we're going to Europe and if everyone fights with his fists, we win anyway, I promise you.

& # 39; That's what I wish would have happened. I made a lot of mistakes, but it brought me to this place where I am now and I don't want to trade with anyone. & # 39;

But Armstrong said he knew from the beginning that doping was widespread at the time.

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& # 39; I knew there would be knives in this fight, & # 39; he said. & # 39; Not just fists. I knew there would be knives. I had knives and one day people with weapons started to appear.

& # 39; That's when you say, am I flying back to Plano, Texas and I don't know what you're going to do? Or do you walk to the gun shop? I went to the gun shop. I didn't want to go home.

& # 39; I don't want to apologize to myself that everyone did it or that we could never have won without it. They are all true, but the goat stops at me.

& # 39; I am the person who made the decision to do what I did. I didn't want to go home, man. I would stay. & # 39;

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