Ladbrokes cashier, 22, paid more than £1million to crime gang in three hours, court hears

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Paris Markham, 22, accepted 22 slips on tricast bets from £90 to £95 each making between £5,000 and £100,000, the judges heard

Paris Markham, 22, accepted 22 slips on tricast bets from £90 to £95 each making between £5,000 and £100,000, the judges heard

A rogue Ladbrokes cashier paid more than £1million to a crime gang in three hours by taking ineligible horse racing betting coupons as winners, a court has heard.

Paris Markham, 22, accepted 22 slips on tricast bets from £90 to £95 each making between £5,000 and £100,000 at the betting shop in Edmonton, London, the judges heard.

She was part of a conspiracy with ex-boyfriend Aurica Vaduva, 23, and Daniel Constantin, 28, that allowed the scammers to blow a fortune on luxury goods, the court was told.

Markham admits to being involved in the plot to defraud her employers, but claims she was threatened by men in the street while on her way to work.

Constantin has admitted to conspiracy to commit fraud and conspiracy to launder money and will be convicted at the end of the trial at Wood Green Crown Court.

Corinne Bramwell, prosecutor, said an organized criminal gang collaborated to “defraud a gambling company worth just over £1 million, over the course of a few hours on June 30, 2019”.

She said the group had also collaborated on “their subsequent efforts to conceal, convert or disguise the proceeds of that conspiracy.”

Over the course of about three hours, between 2 and 5 pm, customer service manager Paris Markham fraudulently paid out a series of 22 winning bets worth a total of just over a million pounds to the OCG members posing as customers .

“In reality, the monies obtained were transferred to the bank accounts of these defendants.

“The money was moved in this way to access and use that money stolen by the organized crime group.

It was moved in credit transactions, cash withdrawals, foreign currency purchases and purchases of high-value goods such as luxury motor vehicles, either on the same day of the fraud or the day after.

“The case of the Crown is that each defendant took on a specific different role.

The Crown suggests Ms Markham played a central role in the fraud, she was an employee at Ladbrokes and worked at the Edmonton facility, she was the insider.

Markham (pictured) admits to being involved in the plot to defraud her employers, but claims she was threatened in the street by men on her way to work

Markham (pictured) admits to being involved in the plot to defraud her employers, but claims she was threatened in the street by men on her way to work

Markham (pictured) admits to being involved in the plot to defraud her employers, but claims she was threatened in the street by men on her way to work

“She used her position to facilitate the transaction of hundreds of thousands of pounds to the other members, without her the fraud would not have been possible.”

“There is no question that Mrs Markham made those payments or that they were fraudulent.

“She pleads not guilty as she says she behaved the way she did because she was threatened in the street on her way to work, so she claims she acted under duress.

‘The horse racing betting slips were handed over to Mrs Markham, the bets placed are known as tricast bets, on the first, second and third place of a race.

“In this case, bets have been placed in the amount of £90 or £95, with a return of approximately £5,000 and £100,000 for a single trade.

“The bet slips and thus the actual bets placed in this fraud were intentionally illegible, if the correct procedure had been followed those bet slips would have been invalidated and not accepted during the course of the policy.

‘After the race, the slip was registered as a winning bet, inappropriate and fraudulent, in abuse of Ms Markham’s position as an employee, she transferred the winnings to co-conspirators.

“According to the prosecutor, she was not coerced and she did so voluntarily with her partner and father of her child.

“Mrs Markham’s role at Ladbrokes was as the woman from within, who essentially stole the money from her employer Ladbrokes disguised as legitimate profits.

‘Mr Vaduva is a close associate of Daniel Constantin and it is noteworthy that he was Mrs Markham’s friend at the time of the offences.

‘Mrs Stoica was in a relationship with Daniel’s brother and she received a portion of the proceeds into her Nationwide account and transferred £20,000 to her boyfriend.

‘Count seven pertains to her Metrobank account, she was unable to squander any of that money and was therefore in possession of it.

‘Mr Radu is a friend and associate of Mr Vaduva and they worked together at the time, he received over £135,000 of Ladbrokes money fraudulently obtained in count eight.

“He has actively hidden or transferred about £20,000 for his own purposes in count nine.”

Vaduva is charged with possession of £139,732.80 and of laundering a further £21,000.

Markham, of Barnet, and Vaduva, of Enfield, deny conspiracy to commit fraud.

Vaduva denies further counts of conspiracy to conceal, disguise, convert or transfer criminal property; possession of criminal property; and the concealment, disguise, conversion or transfer of criminal property.

Constantin’s brother’s girlfriend, Arabela Stoica, 22, and Vaduva’s associate Somaila Radu, 29, are charged with possession and laundering of the profits.

Stoica reportedly had two sums totaling £292,538.40 and laundered a further £173,490.

Radu reportedly had £135,556 in his account and has laundered a further £20,480.

Stoica, of Leyton, denies conspiracy to conceal, disguise, convert or transfer criminal property; one count of concealing, disguising, converting or transferring criminal property; and two counts of possession of criminal property.

Radu, of Enfield, denies conspiracy to conceal, disguise, convert or transfer criminal property; a count of possession of criminal property; and one count of concealing, disguising, converting or transferring criminal property.

Constantin, of Ilford, has admitted to conspiracy to defraud and will later be convicted.

The process continues.

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