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The PvdA blamed Bill Shorten's unpopularity for her election loss in 2019 - but denied her controversial tax policy due (he is depicted, right, with wife Chloe during election night)

Labor blames Bill Shorten for losing the election because he & # 39; too unpopular & # 39; was – instead of because the party wanted to raise taxes

  • Labor & # 39; s assessment of the party's federal election loss blamed Bill Shorten
  • It blamed the unpopularity of the former opposition leader for losing seats by the ALP
  • It explained Labor's controversial tax policy & # 39; the party didn't cost the elections & # 39;
  • Review defended the polarizing policy for negative gearing and franking credits
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The PvdA blamed the unpopularity of Bill Shorten for her election loss in 2019 – but denied that her controversial tax policy was to blame.

Former Labor Minister Craig Emerson and former South Australian Prime Minister Jay Weatherill had to explain why the ALP lost a third consecutive federal election in May.

This despite the fact that Labor won 55 newspapers in a row and the Liberal Party changed the Prime Minister for the third time in three years just nine months before election day.

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The PvdA blamed Bill Shorten's unpopularity for her election loss in 2019 - but denied her controversial tax policy due (he is depicted, right, with wife Chloe during election night)

The PvdA blamed Bill Shorten's unpopularity for her election loss in 2019 – but denied her controversial tax policy due (he is depicted, right, with wife Chloe during election night)

As opposition leader, Mr. Shorten chaired a humiliating defeat in which Labor lost five seats in Queensland, Tasmania and western Sydney.

& # 39; Labor lost the elections due to a weak strategy that could not adapt to the change in liberal leadership, a messy policy agenda that seemed risky and an unpopular leader, & # 39; the rating, released on Thursday, said.

However, the election post mortem refused to blame Labor's controversial tax policy for negative gearing and franking credits.

& # 39; Labor tax policy has not cost the party the elections, & # 39; it said.

Instead, the assessment blamed the & # 39; size and complexity of its $ 100 million in spending announcements.

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The assessment argued that & # 39; Labor was exposed to a coalition attack that feared insecure low-income couples in suburban and regional Australia that Labor would crash the economy and risk their jobs & # 39 ;.

As opposition leader, Mr. Shorten (pictured in Perth) foresaw a humiliating defeat in which Labor lost five seats in Queensland, Tasmania and western Sydney

As opposition leader, Mr. Shorten (pictured in Perth) foresaw a humiliating defeat in which Labor lost five seats in Queensland, Tasmania and western Sydney

As opposition leader, Mr. Shorten (pictured in Perth) foresaw a humiliating defeat in which Labor lost five seats in Queensland, Tasmania and western Sydney

Labor was fiercely punished in regional Queensland, with the Opposition having more than 11 percent swings in Capricornia and Dawson in federal seats that overlap with electorates of the state ALP.

It lost the seat of Longman, north of Brisbane; the Herbert electorate based in Townsville; Lindsay in western Sydney and the regional Tasmanian seats of Bass and Braddon.

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The opposition went to the election promise to prevent some retirees from receiving franking tax credits if they had received dividends on their shares, where a company had already paid the 30 percent corporate tax rate.

It also promised to scrap negative tax breaks for landlords who purchased an existing property from January 2020.

On election night, Scott Morrison became prime minister since 1943 to turn a minority into a majority.

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