Labor increases to the best vote in eight years when the Liberals fall to the 40th consecutive loss

The latest Newspoll shows that the Scott Morrison Coalition (pictured) is behind Labor in a preferred two-party base 44 to 56 percent

The Labor Party has risen to its best vote in eight years when the brutal spill of leaders saw the Coalition plummet to its 40th consecutive Newspoll loss.

The change from Malcolm Turnbull to Scott Morrison as prime minister on August 24 did not give the government a rebound in its voting numbers.

In the first biweekly Newspoll since the spill, the Coalition experienced a further fall in the preferred terms of two parties, falling behind Labor by 44 to 56 percent.

The difference was narrower in the latest Newspoll of the Prime Minister of Mr. Turnbull in 49 to 51 percent.

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The latest Newspoll shows that the Scott Morrison Coalition (pictured) is behind Labor in a preferred two-party base 44 to 56 percent

The latest Newspoll shows that the Scott Morrison Coalition (pictured) is behind Labor in a preferred two-party base 44 to 56 percent

The Newspoll, published on Monday, is the best result for the Labor Party in eight years, however, Mr. Morrison is the preferred prime minister over opposition leader Bill Shorten (pictured)

The Newspoll, published on Monday, is the best result for the Labor Party in eight years, however, Mr. Morrison is the preferred prime minister over opposition leader Bill Shorten (pictured)

The Newspoll, published on Monday, is the best result for the Labor Party in eight years, however, Mr. Morrison is the preferred prime minister over opposition leader Bill Shorten (pictured)

The survey published in The Australian on Monday also showed that the primary vote of the government rose by a point from 33 to 34 percent, but Labor also rose by one point to 42 percent.

It is the highest level of support that Labor has experienced since the days following the ouster of Kevin Rudd as prime minister in June 2010 and is close to the levels of support the party enjoyed before winning the 2007 election.

But the Newspoll did show some positive signs for the Coalition.

The results showed that Mr. Morrison was the preferred prime minister over Labor leader Bill Shorten, with a vote of 42 to 36 percent.

More than 40 percent of voters were satisfied with Mr. Morrison's performance, while 39 percent were dissatisfied, the survey showed.

This compared to Mr. Shorten's performance results, with 37 percent of voters satisfied with their performance, compared with 51 percent dissatisfied.

Mr. Morrison (left) replaced Malcolm Turnbull (right) as prime minister on August 24, but the change in leadership has not given the Coalition a boost in its voting numbers

Mr. Morrison (left) replaced Malcolm Turnbull (right) as prime minister on August 24, but the change in leadership has not given the Coalition a boost in its voting numbers

Mr. Morrison (left) replaced Malcolm Turnbull (right) as prime minister on August 24, but the change in leadership has not given the Coalition a boost in its voting numbers

The main vote of the Greens remains at 10 percent, while One Nation has dropped one point to 6 percent.

The survey consulted 1,653 voters and took place between September 6 and 9.

Former Prime Minister Tony Abbott, one of the key agitators for a change in leadership, said on Sunday that the government was returning to normalcy.

"I think this is a better government today than it was three weeks ago, and I'm hoping to give it all the support," Abbott told the Nine network at the Sydney airport.

Morrison is ready to face his first parliamentary question as prime minister this week, with an optimistic Labor opposition that is expected to focus on the coup that broke the Liberal Party.

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