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Kyleena, a five-year contraceptive implant, is subsidized by the Australian government

Australia’s cheapest contraceptive: a five-year implant that is subsidized by the government after 15 years of struggle – but it can have serious side effects

  • Kyleena will be listed on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) on 1 March
  • Patients pay $ 41, while concession ticket holders pay $ 6.60
  • Kyleena is a T-shaped device that is inserted into the woman’s womb to prevent pregnancy
  • The contraceptive method prevents pregnancy for a maximum of five years

An implant that can prevent pregnancy for up to five years is finally subsidized by the Australian government, despite warnings that it may be a health risk.

Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt has announced that the Kyleena device will be listed in the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme (PBS) on March 1, which will allow patients to pay less for the contraceptive.

Normal patients pay $ 41, while holders of a concession card have to pay $ 6.60 after a 15-year struggle to put it on the PBS list.

Regular patients pay $ 41, while holders of a concession card have to pay $ 6.60 after a 15-year struggle to put it on the PBS list (photo: Kyleena IUD)

Regular patients pay $ 41, while holders of a concession card have to pay $ 6.60 after a 15-year struggle to put it on the PBS list (photo: Kyleena IUD)

Kyleena is a small, flexible T-shaped device that is inserted into a woman’s womb to prevent pregnancy for up to five years.

The device releases a small dose of progestin hormone that thickenes the mucus to the uterus to prevent sperm from passing through.

The lining of the uterus then becomes thinner and makes it difficult for a fertilized egg to hold, preventing pregnancy.

“The PBS list from Kyleena offers women an important new method of contraception that works to prevent pregnancy up to five years,” said Dr. Bayer ANZ country medical director. Eduardo Pimenta.

“Improved access to long-acting reversible birth control has become a health policy priority in Australia because it provides continuous, reliable birth control that is not dependent on user behavior.

“A recent survey of more than 1,000 women using oral contraception showed that 90 percent had forgotten to take their pill at least once.”

Kyleena is a small, flexible T-shaped device that is inserted into the womb of a woman to prevent pregnancy for up to five years (stock)

Kyleena is a small, flexible T-shaped device that is inserted into the womb of a woman to prevent pregnancy for up to five years (stock)

Kyleena is a small, flexible T-shaped device that is inserted into the womb of a woman to prevent pregnancy for up to five years (stock)

Women who use the contraceptive experience an irregular number of days of bleeding for up to three to six months, possibly mocking and / or slight bleeding. Some women can stop their periods completely.

Side effects include headache, pelvic pain, swelling of the vagina, depression, migraine, hair loss, vaginal infection and cysts in the ovaries.

The IUD does not prevent sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and additional measures are encouraged during sexual intercourse.

Side effects of Kyleena

Headache

– Abdominal / pelvic pain

– Acne / oily skin

– itching

– Redness and / or swelling

– Hair loss or excessive hair

– Vaginal infections

– discharge

– Menstrual pain

– Chest pain or discomfort

– Ovarian cysts

– Removal of the coil

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