Yousef Alrasheed was accused of kicking and choking his wife during a violent attack in their Maribyrnong house. He stays in his home country of Kuwait but will now apply for a visa to return without charge above his head

A jet-setting Kuwaiti playboy who allegedly demolished one of his three wives will escape justice after the police accusing him refused to apply for a criminal case that would have brought him back to Australia.

Yousef Alrasheed was accused of kicking and choking his wife during a violent attack in their Maribyrnong house, in north-west Melbourne, in March last year.

He was accused by the Victoria police of three counts of illegal attacks on the attack, which would have seen him put on white gloves to choke his wife in her own bed in the middle of the night.

Yousef Alrasheed was accused of kicking and choking his wife during a violent attack in their Maribyrnong house. He stays in his home country of Kuwait but will now apply for a visa to return without charge above his head

Yousef Alrasheed was accused of kicking and choking his wife during a violent attack in their Maribyrnong house. He stays in his home country of Kuwait but will now apply for a visa to return without charge above his head

Criminal lawyer George Balot, of Balot Reilly Criminal Lawyers, fought to bring Alrasheed back to Australia for justice despite objections from the Victoria police

Criminal lawyer George Balot, of Balot Reilly Criminal Lawyers, fought to bring Alrasheed back to Australia for justice despite objections from the Victoria police

Criminal lawyer George Balot, of Balot Reilly Criminal Lawyers, fought to bring Alrasheed back to Australia for justice despite objections from the Victoria police

Alrasheed is the heir to a multi-million dollar retail sport giant company in his home country that has been compared to the Kuwaiti version of Rebel Sport.

He had been granted a visa to live in Australia with one of his three wives staying in Australia with a student visa.

The Alrasheed visa expired when he visited Kuwait in February and the Department of Immigration refused to extend it.

The documents from the Court show that Alrasheed lost his calm after arguing with his wife about the cleanliness of their house.

With the two-year gift from the couple, Alrasheed reportedly broke out, pushed his wife over her and repeatedly kicked her while she was downstairs.

The terrified woman called the police, but two days later her husband would return.

This time he would have returned to the house in the middle of the night.

According to court records, Alrasheed pulled white gloves out of a plastic bag and sneaked to the family home.

After he found his wife asleep in bed, Alrasheed would have put his hands around her throat and throttled her.

The frightened woman fought back, grabbed her husband by the testicles and squeezed it until he released his grip.

When she heard the commotion, their little girl came running into the bedroom and started crying.

It was an act that possibly saved the woman's life when Alrasheed picked her up and led her back to her own bedroom, where he too fell asleep.

The police caught up with him later that day, where Alrasheed denied that he had attacked his wife.

& # 39; No, no hassle, & # 39; he said to them. & # 39; I hugged my wife with a hug and she hugged me back. & # 39;

Police Attorney Senior Constable Cara Diamond was criticized by both the magistrate and Alrasheed & # 39; s lawyer George Balot after he stated that it & & lt; 39 / would reflect badly & & # 39; on the police if he were insulted again

Police Attorney Senior Constable Cara Diamond was criticized by both the magistrate and Alrasheed & # 39; s lawyer George Balot after he stated that it & & lt; 39 / would reflect badly & & # 39; on the police if he were insulted again

Police Attorney Senior Constable Cara Diamond was criticized by both the magistrate and Alrasheed & # 39; s lawyer George Balot after he stated that it & & lt; 39 / would reflect badly & & # 39; on the police if he were insulted again

Magistrate Constantinos Kilias heard that the Victoria police refused to apply for a specific criminal justice visa, designed to ensure that alleged criminals could be prosecuted abroad for fear that it would be bad if he were here again be offended.

& # 39; It would be bad for the Victoria police, because the Victoria police facilitated his return, & # 39; said police chief Sen-Constable Cara Diamond to Mr. Kilias.

Mr. Kilias warned the public prosecutor that the failure to apply for the visa by Victoria Police could lead him to reject the accusations and gave her time to inquire with senior officers.

Under part of the Immigration Act, the Attorney General, the Director of Public Prosecutors or the Victoria Police can apply for the visa.

It is clear that the DPP would not prosecute the case because it was not the prosecution.

The bizarre case saw Alrasheed's lawyer fight to give him the visa so that he could return to Melbourne and contest the indictment.

The case hit the court after the Victoria Police had requested an arrest warrant to arrest Alrasheed, although he needed access to the country to execute an order for execution.

High-quality criminal lawyer George Balot told the court that his client was willing to put $ 10,000 on a trust account to pay for his flight and costs.

He argued that the order was useless because his client wanted to contest the case but needed a visa to go to court.

& # 39; Issuing an arrest warrant would be unnecessary, & # 39; he said.

Magistrate Constantinos Kilias rejected the charges against Alrasheed after repeatedly warning a police officer that he would refuse to apply for a visa for the judge if he refused

Magistrate Constantinos Kilias rejected the charges against Alrasheed after repeatedly warning a police officer that he would refuse to apply for a visa for the judge if he refused

Magistrate Constantinos Kilias rejected the charges against Alrasheed after repeatedly warning a police officer that he would refuse to apply for a visa for the judge if he refused

A migration agent was summoned to testify at a previous hearing and said she had never heard that a visa for a visa had been refused by the minister.

The police refused to apply for the visa due to the nature of the incident and the likely outcome.

The magistrate was devastating in his assessment of the attitude of the police towards the visa application.

Before attacking, Mr. Kilias gave Senior Constable Diamond one last chance to submit the application, but she again refused.

& # 39; The suspect has clearly indicated that he wants to challenge and handle the charge & # 39 ;, Kilias said.

He told the public prosecutor that a visa application from Alrasheed itself can take up to 14 months to be processed, and even then probably refused because of the indictment.

& # 39; Victoria Police has steadily refused or even applied for a visa & # 39 ;, he said.

The court heard that the police had stubbornly refused to apply for the visa for various reasons, including the fear of the way it would look if Alrasheed reoffended, the fact that it could not follow its movements and travel expenses.

& # 39; Victoria Police does not think the outcome justifies the cost of the visa & # 39 ;, Kilias said.

He said the refusal by Victoria Police & # 39; had nothing to do with justice, but with cost effectiveness & # 39; and with the ability to monitor Alrasheed.

& # 39; Victoria Police proved a lack of bona fide in prosecuting this case & # 39 ;, he said.

Daily Mail Australia has been told that while Alrasheed in Australia is only legally married to one woman, he actually has three women according to Islamic law.

Outside of the court, Mr. Balot – who asked for the charges – was damning from Victoria Police.

"Proper administration of justice requires that defendants have the right to be present in person, in accordance with the Charter of Human Rights," he said.

& # 39; The Prosecution did not think so. The learned magistrate gave them the opportunity to do that. He warned them that the charge would be rejected if they refused to accept and apply for a visa because it was too expensive.

& # 39; That reflects badly in my opinion. The prosecutor said it would be bad at the Victoria Police to bring him back. In my opinion, it badly reflects the prosecutor who refuses to return him for a serious domestic violence incident. & # 39;

It is clear that Alrasheed is now trying to obtain a business visa with a view to opening its own sports stores in Australia.

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