Kim Kardashian makes a SECOND trip to the White House to meet with Trump

Kim Kardashian will fight the case of Chris Young (pictured), a 30-year-old who is serving a life sentence in a federal prison in Lexington

Kim Kardashian is in the White House to highlight a drug indictment case of a convicted criminal he hopes to free.

A White House official confirmed to DailyMail.com that Kardashian is currently on the property participating in a criminal justice reform panel with Jared Kushner.

"Today, in the White House, the members of the Administration organize a listening session about the leniency process, the discussion focuses mainly on ways to improve that process to ensure that deserved cases receive a fair review," said Hogan Gidley. , undersecretary of press of the White House.

Kushner led the meeting that included an attorney for Alice Johnson, Kardashian West and the general counsel for Koch Industries.

The president was not scheduled to take part in the conversation, but that was also the case the last time Kardashian was on the property. She and Trump visited in the Oval Office in June without the journalists present. The White House distributed a picture of the cast after the fact.

In June, the television star helped free Alice Johnson, a 63-year-old woman from Tennessee who was sentenced to life in prison in 1996 on non-violent drug charges.

President Trump commuted his sentence after Kardashian's relentless campaign against his harsh mandatory punishment.

The star of reality is taking on the cause of Chris Young, a 30-year-old drug dealer who is serving life in prisona federal prison in Lexington, Kentucky.

Kim Kardashian will fight the case of Chris Young (pictured), a 30-year-old who is serving a life sentence in a federal prison in Lexington

Kim Kardashian will fight the case of Chris Young (pictured), a 30-year-old who is serving a life sentence in a federal prison in Lexington

In June, the superstar (pictured) celebrated the release of Alice Johnson, a 63-year-old woman from Tennessee who was sentenced to life in prison in 1996 for non-violent drug-related charges.

In June, the superstar (pictured) celebrated the release of Alice Johnson, a 63-year-old woman from Tennessee who was sentenced to life in prison in 1996 for non-violent drug-related charges.

In June, the superstar (pictured) celebrated the release of Alice Johnson, a 63-year-old woman from Tennessee who was sentenced to life in prison in 1996 for non-violent drug-related charges.

Kardashian will officially announce the news about Jason Flom's Wrongful Conviction podcast today.

According to a preview of Page Six, she says: Yesterday, I had a phone call with a gentleman who is in prison for a drug case: they gave me life. It's so unfair. He is 30 years old. He has been in almost 10 years. "

I felt that the only person who understood that all the adversity he had suffered was gone. I was lost and I made many bad decisions

Chris Young after the death of his brother

"I was talking on the phone with the judge who sentenced him to life, who resigned because he had never been on the side of having to do something so unfair, and now he is fighting [alongside] us to obtain [Young] outside. & # 39;

Young has been in jail since he was arrested at a Shell gas station in Clarksville, Tennessee in December.

I was talking to a drug dealer named Robert Porter while he was standing next to Porter's car that contained eight ounces of cocaine and six ounces of crack.

Young went to trial after rejecting a guilty plea because he felt the prayer offered was too long.

He was convicted of conspiracy with the intent to possess and distribute 500 grams of cocaine and 280 grams of crack, intend to distribute it to 1,000 feet of a secondary school, and knowingly possess a firearm in compliance with a traffic offense of drugs

Due to previous convictions, the judge had no choice but to give him life in prison.

Young had been arrested for possession of drugs with a firearm in 2006 and for possession of less than half a gram of cocaine in 2007, the same year that his brother Robert committed suicide.

Later he said of his brother's death: "I felt like the only person who understood that all the adversity I had suffered was gone, I was lost and I made many bad decisions."

The judge who sentenced Young, Kevin Sharp (pictured), walked out of the courthouse in protest of "unjust" & # 39;

The judge who sentenced Young, Kevin Sharp (pictured), walked out of the courthouse in protest of "unjust" & # 39;

The judge who sentenced Young, Kevin Sharp (pictured), walked out of the courthouse in protest of "unjust" & # 39;

The judge who sentenced Young, Kevin Sharp, left the court in protest of the "unjust" mandatory sentences.

He said at Young's sentencing hearing in 2014: It is assumed that each defendant should be treated as an individual. I do not think that's happening here. "

Young had testified that his mother was a drug addict and that her home sometimes had no light or water.

He worked at a funeral home but soon joined his friends to treat drugs as a way to survive, he said.

Young said in his sentencing that he had been relentlessly studying in prison to "improve himself."

He said: "I see this as if I were in college, I can not go to frat parties or talk to women, but now is the time to put my skills to work." When I read in my cell, it's as if I was studying in my cell. bedroom ".

Judge Sharp told the Tennessean: "If I could have not given you life in prison, I would have done it."

He added: "The majority of defendants (in drug cases) are not dangerous, they are simply children who lack opportunities and supervision, lack education and have ended up doing what seems to be at the moment the path of minor resistance to make a living. "

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