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Kilicdaroglu – Erdogan.. Learn about the two different extremes that are very popular in Turkey

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Kemal Kilicdaroglu was born in 1948 in a village in the Tunceli region in eastern Anatolia. He is a Turkish politician and economist. He leads the Turkish opposition in Parliament as well as the Republican People’s Party and is one of the strongest opponents of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Kemal Kilicdaroglu in brief

Kemal Kilicdaroglu was born in 1948 in a village in the Tunceli region in eastern Anatolia. He is a Turkish politician and economist. He leads the Turkish opposition in Parliament as well as the Republican People’s Party and is one of the strongest opponents of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

He is running in this election as a candidate of the Republican People’s Party within the Nation Alliance.

Kilicdaroglu has been a member of the Turkish Parliament since 2002. He is a supporter of the Syrian regime and has strong relations with Iran.

He ran for mayor of Istanbul in the 2009 local elections, but lost to the candidate of the Justice and Development Party.

The press dubbed him “Gandhi-Kamal” for the great resemblance in appearance as well as style to Mahatma Gandhi

Recep Tayyip Erdogan

The candidate and the current president of Turkey is trying to stay in the position he has held since 2014.

The most prominent stations in Erdogan’s life

Turkish politician and economist, born on February 26, 1954, is the twelfth and current president of Turkey since 2014.

He held many positions in the past, including the position of Prime Minister from 2003 to 2014.

He headed the Istanbul municipality from 1994 to 1998. After that, he founded the Justice and Development Party, which he currently leads. He is someone who has an Islamic background.

prison

Erdogan was sentenced to prison and stripped of his post on charges of inciting religious hatred. I am excluded from political action. But then the Constitutional Court overturned the decision.

President Erdogan ranked first among the 500 most influential Muslims in the world in 2019.

Two different approaches

One warns of the danger of chaos, and the other promises a return to spring.

Turkey is choosing between President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has been in power for twenty years, and Kemal Kilicdaroglu, the candidate of a broad coalition of the opposition.

One man power or a collective destination: authoritarianism or the promised restoration of the rule of law: There are two possible futures and two options for society open in this country of 85 million people that is more divided than ever.

Between Erdogan, 69, who wants to stay in power, and Kilicdaroglu, 74, it is not a matter of generation but of style and conviction.

The head of state, who comes from a modest family in a popular neighborhood in Istanbul, is a devout Muslim who preaches family values ​​and still leads the conservative majority that has long been disdained by an urban and secular elite.

“our leader”

“Erdogan is our leader and we are his soldiers!” said one of Erdogan’s supporters, Sonor Henik, 48. She is waiting for “the president,” as many of his supporters call him, during his last election rally in Qasim Pasha, his hometown.

Erdogan was the former mayor of Istanbul (1994-1998) and came to power in 2003 after the victory of the Justice and Development Party (Islamic conservative), which he founded the previous year.

As for Kemal Kilicdaroglu, who was born in humble circles in Dersim (now Tunceli) in eastern Anatolia, he is an economist and former official employee, who headed the Turkish Social Security.

Since 2010, he is the head of the Republican People’s Party (Social, Democratic), which was established by the founder of the Turkish nation, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, who has always advocated strict secularism.

Evidence of their different convictions, Erdogan ended his campaign on Saturday evening in front of the Hagia Sophia Cathedral in Istanbul, which he converted into a mosque in 2020, while his rival ended his campaign in Ankara in front of Ataturk’s shrine.

Kemal Kilicdaroglu belongs to the Alevi sect, which has long been seen as a potential obstacle to his election.

But the opposition candidate knew how to circumvent this obstacle, in a videotape in which he addressed this issue, and it received more than a hundred million views on Twitter.

He also knew how to reassure some conservatives by promising a law guaranteeing women the right to wear the hijab.

“re-democracy”

Erdogan, a tireless warrior, knows how to move the crowd, ramps up his rhetoric, uses insults and even insults and calls his opponent a “terrorist”, a gay rights promoter denounces a Western plot, and can speak for more than an hour at the pulpit up to three times a day.

He defends his performance and the development of the country and infrastructure during the two decades of his rule – but he is stumbled by the economic crisis in the country with inflation still exceeding 40% and a currency that has halved its value in two years.

As for Kilicdaroglu, he preferred to include others in his electoral rallies, and he was often accompanied on platforms by the mayors of Istanbul, Akram Imamoglu, and Ankara Mansur Yavas, who are from the Republican People’s Party, along with leaders from his party, and he does not speak much.

After being denied access to most of the Turkish TV channels that broadcast each of the president’s election interviews live, he bet on social media and developed his vision for the future in short videos filmed in his kitchen, which became a hit on Twitter.

“Kamal,” as he wants his name to appear on propaganda posters, also presents himself as a fighter against corruption that has been rampant for years and nepotism, which, according to him, has reached the top of the state’s hierarchy.

And he asked on Friday evening, at the conclusion of his last electoral rally in Ankara, “Are you ready to restore democracy to this country? To achieve peace?”

If elected, Kilicdaroglu intends to return to the presidential palace that Mustafa Kemal Ataturk chose in Ankara in 1923, when the republic was proclaimed, and abandon the lavish mansion that Erdogan built and has more than 1,100 rooms.

Merryhttps://whatsnew2day.com/
Merry C. Vega is a highly respected and accomplished news author. She began her career as a journalist, covering local news for a small-town newspaper. She quickly gained a reputation for her thorough reporting and ability to uncover the truth.

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