Kevin Hart’s shopper appears in court after ‘using the actor’s credit cards to buy luxury goods’

Kevin Hart’s personal shopper appears in court after he “used the actor’s credit cards to purchase $1.2 million worth of luxury goods, including Patek Philippe watches, Louis Vuitton bags and a painting by Sam Friedman.”

  • Actor Kevin Hart hired Dylan Syer, 29, in 2015 to buy him personal items
  • Over time, however, he began using Hart’s credit cards to funnel money into his personal accounts, according to the Queens County District Attorney.
  • He reportedly bought himself luxury items worth $1.2 million, including a pair of Louis Vuitton bags, five Patek Philippe watches and a painting by Sam Friedman.
  • He then reportedly showed off the stolen property on his Instagram page
  • Syer was arrested in February and charged with grand theft, criminal possession of stolen property, identity theft and fraud
  • He appeared in court on Thursday as his trial continues

Dylan Syer, 29, was arrested in February for allegedly using actor Kevin Hart’s credit cards to fund his own lavish lifestyle.

Kevin Hart’s former personal shopper appeared in court on Thursday as he faces charges of grand theft for allegedly using the actor’s credit cards to fund his own lavish lifestyle.

The actor/comedian hired Dylan Syer, 29, in 2015 to buy him personal items, but over time, Syer began using Hart’s credit cards to deposit money into his personal accounts and $1.2 million in luxuries. to buy items that he sent to his home and business, Queens County District Attorney Melinda Katz said.

He was arrested in February and charged with grand theft, criminal possession of stolen property, identity theft and fraud.

On Thursday, he virtually appeared in court with his lawyer, dressed in a simple gray t-shirt.

DailyMail.com has reached out to the Queens County District Attorney’s Office for more information about what happened in court on Thursday.

Syer reportedly started working for Hart, 42, in 2015 and started buying him the items he requested.

Hart, 42, reportedly hired Syer as his personal shopper in 2015

But between October 12, 2017 and February 25, 2019, the prosecution alleges, Syer began using the actor’s credit card to bolster his personal bills and have luxury items shipped to his home, which he would later show off on his Instagram account. page.

In all, Syer is accused of purchasing nearly $1.2 million worth of luxury items — including five Patek Philippe watches worth more than $400,000, a pair of Louis Vuitton bags, 16 Bearbrick collectible dolls — which may vary. from hundreds to thousands of dollars a doll, a Sam Friedman painting and five KAWS collectible dolls.

After his arrest, the prosecution said at the time that police officers raided his home and seized approximately $250,000 in cash and goods. They were in the process of taking back all illegally purchased goods in an effort to recoup Hart’s losses.

Syer, right, appeared in court on Thursday to face grand theft and other charges as the trial of his alleged theft continues.

Syer, right, appeared in court on Thursday to face grand theft and other charges as the trial of his alleged theft continues.

Patek Philippe watch

He also reportedly bought 16 bearbrick collectible dolls - which can range from hundreds to thousands of dollars per doll

Syer reportedly bought five Patek Philippe watches with Hart’s card, like the one on the left. He also reportedly bought 16 bearbrick collectible dolls – which can range from hundreds to thousands of dollars per doll

The actor is worth about $200 million.

“The defendant thought he was out of reach and was living out his uber-rich lifestyle fantasies,” Katz said in a statement after his arrest.

“But my team discovered the fake purchases — from the credit card charges processed by the bank to tracking FedEx packages delivered to Syer’s home and business.”

“Regardless of whether you are a celebrity or not, anyone can fall victim to this type of fraud,” she added. “It’s vital to keep track of your expenses, check your credit card reports, and carefully keep your financial records to yourself.”

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