Ken Starr ALMOST accused Hillary Clinton of perjury for her "mendacity" & # 039;

Kenneth Starr (seen above) considered seeking an indictment against Hillary Clinton for perjury while investigating her husband, then-President Bill Clinton, the former independent lawyer writes in his new memory

Kenneth Starr considered seeking an indictment against Hillary Clinton for perjury while investigating her husband, then-President Bill Clinton, the former independent adviser writes in his new memoir.

Starr eventually abandoned any idea of ​​accusing the former First Lady even though she believed she was lying when she testified about the suicide of former White House aide Vince Foster.

He recalled that the Clintons made the statements during a deposition on January 22, 1995, according to the book Disdain: A Memory of Clinton's Research.

Both Bill and Hillary Clinton were asked questions under oath about Foster, as well as about the Whitewater land deal of their time in Arkansas, according to an excerpt from the book obtained by Fox News.

Kenneth Starr (seen above) considered seeking an indictment against Hillary Clinton for perjury while investigating her husband, then-President Bill Clinton, the former independent lawyer writes in his new memory

Kenneth Starr (seen above) considered seeking an indictment against Hillary Clinton for perjury while investigating her husband, then-President Bill Clinton, the former independent lawyer writes in his new memory

Writing about the former president, Starr recalls: "Clinton was swinging and weaving, but it was always nice because she avoided responding."

Bill Clinton's attorney, David Kendall, told DailyMail.com in response: "The American people saw through Starr's obsessive pursuit of President Clinton and will see through his attempt to rewrite history to claim his own reputation. stained. "

Starr had a more negative view of Hillary Clinton's performance.

"In the space of three hours, he affirmed, according to our calculation, more than a hundred times that" he did not remember "or" he did not remember ", writes Starr.

This suggested absolute mendacity.

"To be sure, human memory is notoriously fallible, but its tense performance seemed absurd."

Starr writes that he decided not to try to prosecute the First Lady because it would have been difficult to prove that she lied.

& # 39;[P]To say that someone knowingly lied when he said "I do not remember" or "I do not remember" is extremely difficult, especially if that person is the First Lady, "he said.

Both Bill and Hillary Clinton received questions under oath about the death of former White House aide Vince Foster, as well as the deal with the Whitewater land of his passage through Arkansas, according to an excerpt from Starr's new book.

Both Bill and Hillary Clinton received questions under oath about the death of former White House aide Vince Foster, as well as the deal with the Whitewater land of his passage through Arkansas, according to an excerpt from Starr's new book.

Both Bill and Hillary Clinton received questions under oath about the death of former White House aide Vince Foster, as well as the deal with the Whitewater land of his passage through Arkansas, according to an excerpt from Starr's new book.

"What was clear was that you could not bother Mrs. Clinton to look like she was telling the truth."

DailyMail.com has contacted Hillary Clinton's representatives for comments.

Starr's book is the first time he goes into detail about his role in the Clinton research.

Then, President Clinton was almost removed from office after Starr's investigation into the alleged obstruction of justice and perjury led to his impeachment.

Starr writes in his book that the Clintons knowingly embarked on a continuous course of action that despised our venerated system of justice.

He writes that he first became aware of Bill Clinton's risky behavior before the Arkansas Democrat was elected president.

In 1992, when Starr was Attorney General, he traveled to Little Rock, while Clinton, who was the governor of Arkansas at the time, was campaigning for the presidency.

One of Clinton's bodyguards picked up Starr and told him a salacious story after a salacious story about the notorious extracurricular adventures of the governor.

"The highly specific details of the soldier suggested that the stories were not made," Starr writes.

An agent from the state of Arkansas told Starr that Hillary Clinton used "salty language" when he discovered an ongoing clandestine episode in the guest house of the governor's mansion.

"A former beauty pageant queen, the cop told me, had been Bill Clinton's guest," Starr writes.

Foster, whose death was declared a suicide, has been the subject of numerous conspiracy theories involving the Clintons

Foster, whose death was declared a suicide, has been the subject of numerous conspiracy theories involving the Clintons

Foster, whose death was declared a suicide, has been the subject of numerous conspiracy theories involving the Clintons

"Little did I know that in less than two years, after the governor became president, I was commissioned to investigate it," Starr writes.

Clinton's alleged sexual exploits as governor of Arkansas emerged in what became known as the Troopergate scandal.

The troops of the state of Arkansas affirmed that during the mandate of Clinton like governor, they organized sexual encounter with several lovers while they helped to hide his activities to his wife.

During Starr's investigation of the Clintons, he writes that Foster's death "persecuted me."

"In many ways, I was very similar to him: serious about the law, conscientious and loyal to failure," Starr writes about Foster.

"The media had punctured Foster, who knew too well that he could be brutal, especially for someone who is not used to the public eye."

Foster's death has been the subject of numerous conspiracy theories over the years, particularly in conservative right-wing circles.

Although initial investigations determined that Foster's death was suicide, Starr analyzed the accusations that he was killed, according to The Washington Post.

One of the people who urged Starr to investigate Foster's death was Brett Kavanaugh, who at the time was a member of Starr's staff.

Kavanaugh is the candidate of President Donald Trump to replace Anthony Kennedy in the Supreme Court.

In all, five different government investigations into Foster's death ruled that he died by suicide.

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