Karachi farmers use a crane to take animals from the roof farm to Eid al-Adha

Let's move! Livestock farmers in Karachi use a crane to take animals down from the roof farm to bring them to the cattle market in the city before Eid al-Adha

  • Although they seem unusual, such farms are common in Pakistan's largest city, where agricultural land is scarce
  • The animals were transported before Eid al-Adha, one of the holiest days of the Islamic calendar
  • Four-day festival commemorates the story of Prophet Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his son for Allah
  • On Eid al-Adha, an animal is sacrificed and shared between friends, family, and the poor and needy

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Bringing your cows to the market is not always easy – especially for Pakistani farmers keeping their herd on the roof.

Although seemingly unusual, such sights are common in pressure Karachi, the largest city in the country, where a lack of agricultural plots and a bulging population means that farmers choose to keep their animals on rooftops.

Thanks to the help of a crane, the farmers were able to bring their animals to safety, albeit from the height of a four-story building.

Does it slowly: a cow is carefully lifted from a rooftop farm in Karachi, Pakistan and lowered to the ground, four floors below

Does it slowly: a cow is carefully lifted from a rooftop farm in Karachi, Pakistan and lowered to the ground, four floors below

Use of cow feed: The farmers ensure that the animal is carefully tied and secured while it is being brought to the ground

Use of cow feed: The farmers ensure that the animal is carefully tied and secured while it is being brought to the ground

Use of cow feed: The farmers ensure that the animal is carefully tied and secured while it is being brought to the ground

The animals were sent to the cattle market before the Muslim festival of Eid al-Adha, which starts next Sunday.

Considered one of the holiest days of the calendar, the festival marks the prophet Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his son for Allah, but his son was then replaced by a lamb.

To commemorate this intervention, an animal is sacrificed and divided into three parts.

Part is given to the poor and needy, another is kept for home, and a third is given to family.

The festival lasts four days, but some Muslim countries consider a longer holiday.

On the run: a crowd gathers in Karachi, the largest city in Pakistan, to see the animal as it is lifted by the air with a crane

On the run: a crowd gathers in Karachi, the largest city in Pakistan, to see the animal as it is lifted by the air with a crane

On the run: a crowd gathers in Karachi, the largest city in Pakistan, to see the animal as it is lifted by the air with a crane

Main way there: after maneuvering the animal from the roof, the crane starts the process to bring the cow to safety

Main way there: after maneuvering the animal from the roof, the crane starts the process to bring the cow to safety

Main way there: after maneuvering the animal from the roof, the crane starts the process to bring the cow to safety

Keeping a cool herd: the animal seems calm as it makes its way to the ground before being transported to the market

Keeping a cool herd: the animal seems calm as it makes its way to the ground before being transported to the market

Keeping a cool herd: the animal seems calm as it makes its way to the ground before being transported to the market

Touch down: After the landing, the cow is brought to the cattle market before the Eid al-Adha Muslim festival

Touch down: After the landing, the cow is brought to the cattle market before the Eid al-Adha Muslim festival

Touch down: After the landing, the cow is brought to the cattle market before the Eid al-Adha Muslim festival

It will be completely white: a second animal is tied to the crane and lowered while the crowd looks down while waiting

It will be completely white: a second animal is tied to the crane and lowered while the crowd looks down while waiting

It will be completely white: a second animal is tied to the crane and lowered while the crowd looks down while waiting

Man on the moo: the apparently unusual farm is the result of the busy population of Karachi and the lack of agricultural plots

Man on the moo: the apparently unusual farm is the result of the busy population of Karachi and the lack of agricultural plots

Man on the moo: the apparently unusual farm is the result of the busy population of Karachi and the lack of agricultural plots

Holy cow: the animal will be brought to the market, before Eid al-Adha, one of the holiest festivals in the Muslim calendar

Holy cow: the animal will be brought to the market, before Eid al-Adha, one of the holiest festivals in the Muslim calendar

Holy cow: the animal will be brought to the market, before Eid al-Adha, one of the holiest festivals in the Muslim calendar

Cow-ful does it: the farmer and his animal steadily make their way to the waiting crowd, four floors below them

Cow-ful does it: the farmer and his animal steadily make their way to the waiting crowd, four floors below them

Cow-ful does it: the farmer and his animal steadily make their way to the waiting crowd, four floors below them

Participate in the herd: the animal is only a few meters away from the connection with others who have already made their descent to the ground

Participate in the herd: the animal is only a few meters away from the connection with others who have already made their descent to the ground

Participate in the herd: the animal is only a few meters away from the connection with others who have already made their descent to the ground

Back to Earth: the animals will be sacrificed as part of a Muslim festival commemorating Prophet Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his son for Allah

Back to Earth: the animals will be sacrificed as part of a Muslim festival commemorating Prophet Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his son for Allah

Back to Earth: the animals will be sacrificed as part of a Muslim festival commemorating Prophet Ibrahim's willingness to sacrifice his son for Allah

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