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Sen. Kamala Harris insisted Friday morning that she did not want to cancel all private health insurance as part of a government takeover of & # 39; Medicare For All & # 39 ;.

Hours after appearing as a major force in the Democratic presidential primary by fierce Joe Biden, Kamala Harris played clearance Friday by insisting she does not want to "abolish" private medical insurance.

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The senator in California raised her hand during the Thursday debate, along with Vermont Democratic Socialist Senator Bernie Sanders, meaning she was willing to give up private health care plans in favor of a government-owned monopoly .

But by Friday morning she said she had misunderstood the question.

& # 39; The question was, would you give up your private insurance for that (public) option and I said yes, & # 39; she told & # 39; Morning Joe & # 39; hosts on MSNBC.

NBC News anchor Lester Holt had framed the question on Thursday in a way that gives Harris some leeway.

Sen. Kamala Harris insisted Friday morning that she did not want to cancel all private health insurance as part of a government takeover of & # 39; Medicare For All & # 39 ;.

Sen. Kamala Harris insisted Friday morning that she did not want to cancel all private health insurance as part of a government takeover of & # 39; Medicare For All & # 39 ;.

Harris and Bernie Sanders rolled up their sleeves on Thursday to ask if they would & # 39; do away with private health plans & # 39; as president
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Harris and Bernie Sanders rolled up their sleeves on Thursday to ask if they would & # 39; do away with private health plans & # 39; as president

Harris and Bernie Sanders rolled up their sleeves on Thursday to ask if they would & # 39; do away with private health plans & # 39; as president

& # 39; Many people who look at home have health insurance through their employer & # 39 ;, Holt told the panel of ten candidates. & # 39; Who would abolish private health insurance here in favor of a government-managed plan? & # 39;

Harris stated on Friday that she had the word & # 39; their & # 39; heard as a reference to her own personal insurance policy. Holt meant that the word refers to all Americans who are registered with insurance through their job.

& # 39; You heard it differently than others, & # 39; interviewer Willie Geist told her on Friday.

& # 39; Probably yes, & # 39; she answered.

Harris screwed the needle onto & # 39; CBS This Morning & # 39 ;, and said that among her favorite & # 39; Medicare For all & # 39; model & # 39; A private insurance would certainly exist for additional coverage & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; We would actually extend the benefits. For example, vision care, dental care, hearing aids, which are currently not reimbursed, & she said.

Some studies have suggested that a socialized & # 39; Medicare For All & # 39; system would eliminate private insurance over a four-year glidepath.

Harris has previously been forced to clarify her position in private health insurance.

Harris said in January that it was time for Americans to & # 39; continue & # 39; from the private medical insurance industry, only to claim months later that they only wanted to condemn the bureaucracy

Harris said in January that it was time for Americans to & # 39; continue & # 39; from the private medical insurance industry, only to claim months later that they only wanted to condemn the bureaucracy

Harris said in January that it was time for Americans to & # 39; continue & # 39; from the private medical insurance industry, only to claim months later that they only wanted to condemn the bureaucracy

Harris made the TV laps on Friday after slipping to the top layer, based on a debate performance that was tough in racing politics
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Harris made the TV laps on Friday after slipping to the top layer, based on a debate performance that was tough in racing politics

Harris made the TV laps on Friday after slipping to the top layer, based on a debate performance that was tough in racing politics

During an event at the town hall in January she told CNN Jake Tapper that she proposes to ensure that & # 39; everyone has access to medical care, and that you don't have to go through the process to go through an insurance company, have them give permission, go through the paperwork, all possible delays. & # 39;

& # 39; Which of us has not had that situation where you have to wait for approval, and the doctor says: & # 39; Well, I don't know if your insurance company will cover this & # 39;? & # 39; she said then.

& # 39; Let's eliminate it all. Let's move on. & # 39;

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Harris added that it is & # 39; inhumane to let people go through a system where they cannot literally receive the benefit of what medical science can offer, because an insurance company has decided it will not make their profit in terms of their profit motivation. & # 39;

Within a few hours, her CNN campaign said she was & # 39; open to more moderate health care reform plans, which would protect the industry, driven by other congressional democrats & # 39 ;.

But four months later, Harris told Tapper that she never wanted to suggest that all private health insurance in the US should be abolished.

The & # 39; Medicare For All & # 39; proposal, defended by Senator Bernie Sanders, would oblige Americans to make a Medicare plan, regardless of their ability to pay for private insurance.

The & # 39; Medicare For All & # 39; proposal, defended by Senator Bernie Sanders, would oblige Americans to make a Medicare plan, regardless of their ability to pay for private insurance.

The & # 39; Medicare For All & # 39; proposal, defended by Senator Bernie Sanders, would oblige Americans to make a Medicare plan, regardless of their ability to pay for private insurance.

The question about abolishing private insurance attracted two fans during Thursday's two-day debate event: New York Mayor, Bill de Blasio (left) and Senbury, Elizabeth Warren (right)
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The question about abolishing private insurance attracted two fans during Thursday's two-day debate event: New York Mayor, Bill de Blasio (left) and Senbury, Elizabeth Warren (right)

The question about abolishing private insurance attracted two fans during Thursday's two-day debate event: New York Mayor, Bill de Blasio (left) and Senbury, Elizabeth Warren (right)

& # 39; It was in the context of saying, "Let's remove all bureaucracy. Let's collect all the garbage," she said in May.

& # 39; Oh, not the insurance companies? & # 39; Tapper early.

& # 39; No. That is not what I meant. I know it was interpreted that way, & Harris answered. & # 39; If you look at the tape, I think you'll see that there are clearly many interpretations of what I said. What I meant is, "Let's get rid of the bureaucracy."

The debate on Thursday evening in Miami raised another curiosity: a third hand that slowly rose after Harris and sanders shot their authority with authority over whether to abolish private plans & # 39 ;.

That hand belonged to Joe Biden. The former vice-president sheepishly gave his approval when he saw that his two main rivals were applauded for offering theirs.

Debate moderators asked the same question on Thursday of the first 10 Democrats to get confused in Miami.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and mayor of New York, Bill de Blasio, were the only two candidates to torah their hands.

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