Kadeena Cox STILL sets world record to retain title in Paralympic time trial women’s 500m

Kadeena Cox sets YET a world record by retaining the title in the Paralympic Women’s 500m Time Trial in the final of Izu Velodrome, taking gold by more than a second

  • Kadeena Cox retains her title in the Paralympic time trial in the women’s 500 meters
  • The cyclist broke another world record with a time of 34.433sec
  • Cox will try to repeat the multisport double in Rio by competing in the 400m
  • Hannah Russell and Reece Dunn won gold in the 100m backstroke and 200m freestyle


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Britain’s Kadeena Cox retained her Paralympic time trial title in the women’s 500m in another world record-breaking final at the Izu Velodrome, kicking off what she hopes will be another two-sport win here.

Cox was impervious to the pressures of last riding in Friday’s final and recorded a time of 34.433 seconds to win gold by more than a second and continue ParalympicsGB’s great week on the track. Nine medals fell in three days.

Cox moves into athletics next week, when she will attempt to repeat the multisport doubles she won at the 2016 Rio Games by competing in the 400 meters at Tokyo’s Olympic Stadium.

Kadeena Cox set a new world record by winning gold in the women's C4-5 500m time trial

Kadeena Cox set a new world record by winning gold in the women’s C4-5 500m time trial

Cox wiped off the pressure to go last to score a time of 34.433 seconds to take gold

Cox wiped off the pressure to go last to score a time of 34.433 seconds to take gold

Cox wiped off the pressure to go last to score a time of 34.433 seconds to take gold

The obstacles she has faced will make her an inspiration to many. After the win, she described her struggle with an eating disorder.

“I’ve had injury after injury, which has been difficult because it affects both sports and it’s mentally tough,” she said. “It has resurfaced my eating disorder. But I have a great support network that got me through it.”

Cox also told Channel 4 that she wants to encourage more young black riders in the sport. “There should be no reason that the color of your skin should stop you from doing everything you want to do,” said the 30-year-old.

Briton Jaco van Gass added bronze in the men’s C1-3 1,000m time trial, in addition to the gold he won on Thursday.

Cox, who won gold in Rio in 2016, was more than a second faster than silver medalist Kate O'Brien

Cox, who won gold in Rio in 2016, was more than a second faster than silver medalist Kate O'Brien

Cox, who won gold in Rio in 2016, was more than a second faster than silver medalist Kate O’Brien

There was also silver in dressage for Natasha Baker on her young horse Lottie. Baker was startled when Lottie “waved a little at the commentator’s speaker” as they entered the arena. But they gave an assured performance. “It’s her first time leaving the UK,” Baker said.

There wasn’t such a positive result for David Weir, who failed to make the final of today’s 5,000m wheelchair race, finishing eighth in his heat. He left the arena without comment and must hope for improvement in the 1,500m and marathon.

In the group, Hannah Russell and Reece Dunn won gold respectively in the 100-meter backstroke and the 200-meter freestyle. Jessica-Jane Applegate and Stephen Clegg took bronze.

IAN HERBERT’S PARALYMPIC DIARY

It really looked like Murderball when GB and USA collided during their wheelchair rugby pool match. Wheelchairs were rammed and turned upside down as the US came back from six attempts to win 50-48. “We threw it away,” said GB’s Jim Roberts, who scored 21 tries. GB faces a tough semi-final against Japan.

Ellie Simmonds’ influence on so many short stature athletes was once again apparent, after powerlifting debutant Olivia Broome took bronze. “We go to the Dwarf Sports Association every year and chat there,” Broome said. “Watching her has been a huge inspiration.”

USA denied two penalties awarded to them in their 10-0 goalball win over Egypt. “We want Egypt to enjoy their experience here, and not one person should be responsible for the loss,” said American Asya Miller.

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