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Juul CEO Kevin Burns says his company never intended to use their e-cigarettes for children, nor does he want his own teenagers to use them
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Juul's CEO says his company never intended to use their e-cigarettes with children, nor does he want his own teenagers to use them.

Juul is currently fighting various lawsuits that claim that teenagers have become addicted to nicotine by portraying their e-cigarettes as a trend setting and stylish.

Kevin Burns, the CEO of the company, told CBS This morning that they have never intentionally targeted teenagers to grow their product.

& # 39; As a parent of a 16-year-old, 19-year-old, I don't want my children to use the product. It is not meant for them, & Burns said.

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& # 39; It is not smokers or former smokers who attempt to use the product. We never want them to use the product. & # 39;

Juul CEO Kevin Burns says his company never intended to use their e-cigarettes for children, nor does he want his own teenagers to use them

Juul CEO Kevin Burns says his company never intended to use their e-cigarettes for children, nor does he want his own teenagers to use them

Burns then apologized for every parent whose children became addicted to smoking e-cigarettes.

& # 39; I have empathy for them, for what they are going through, dealing with their children trying to go through all kinds of problems, especially an addiction to a product with nicotine in it, & # 39; he said.

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& # 39; I am sorry for their situation.

& # 39; The company never intended to focus on the youth to grow our product. & # 39;

His comments come after a mother from Missouri, Mindy Boyd, filed a federal lawsuit this week accusing her of developing a marketing strategy aimed at teenagers after her own 14-year-old daughter started to swap with Juul products last year .

The lawsuit, filed with the US District Court in Kansas City and seeking class action, claims that the teenager has become addicted to nicotine and has been unable to quit.

It claims that Juul wanted to radiate his e-cigarettes as a trendsetter and stylish.

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The lawsuit states that Boyd's daughter spends money on the e-cigarette products every week and photographs of her and her & # 39; JUULING & # 39; published on social media.

Juul is currently fighting various lawsuits that claim that teenagers have become addicted to nicotine by portraying their e-cigarettes as a trend setting and stylish

Juul is currently fighting various lawsuits that claim that teenagers have become addicted to nicotine by portraying their e-cigarettes as a trend setting and stylish

Juul is currently fighting various lawsuits that claim that teenagers have become addicted to nicotine by portraying their e-cigarettes as a trend setting and stylish

Boyd claims that her daughter & # 39; became more ill & # 39 ;, & # 39; unusually irritable and anxious & # 39; and & # 39; often has a headache & # 39 ;.

The lawsuit alleges that Juul was aware of & # 39; significant health risk & # 39; s due to nicotine use & # 39; and & # 39; developed an e-cigarette that is more powerful than all other & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; Like large tobacco, Juul focused on America & # 39; s youth, hoping to win customers for life, and it worked & # 39 ;, said the lawsuit.

The suit claims that the company & # 39; is deliberately trivialized, misrepresented, hidden and has not warned about the increased risk of exposure to nicotine and addiction & # 39 ;.

Juul captured 70% of the US e-cigarette market in October 2018, according to Nielsen data, and its emergence has closely followed an explosion of minor vapors.

Last year, one in five American high school students reported using e-cigarettes last month, according to government figures.

Juul has become a scourge in American schools where students vape in toilets, corridors and even classrooms.

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The number of young people and teenagers reporting vapes regularly increased by 900 percent between 2011 and 2015, according to the Surgeon General's office.

Last year, Juul had to remove almost all of his social media and was asked to handle documents that his marketing practice disclosed to the FDA after accusing them of appealing to young people with their advertising

Last year, Juul had to remove almost all of his social media and was asked to handle documents that his marketing practice disclosed to the FDA after accusing them of appealing to young people with their advertising

Last year, Juul had to remove almost all of his social media and was asked to handle documents that his marketing practice disclosed to the FDA after accusing them of appealing to young people with their advertising

Last year, Juul had to remove almost all of his social media and was asked to handle documents that made his marketing practice known to the FDA.

Meanwhile, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are currently investigating 200 possible cases of lung disease that can be linked to the use of e-cigarettes.

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Juul's CEO acknowledged that the series of diseases reported in 30 states was "worrying" & # 39; but said he does not yet believe that Juul's products are to blame.

He defended his product and said that Juul is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to investigate the wave of diseases.

& # 39; If there was any indication that there was a negative health condition with regard to our product, I think we would take action quickly, & # 39; Burns said.

& # 39; We have a product that is legal today, has been tested for toxicity and does not present any risk based on the guidelines of this category for the American public.

& # 39; I cannot imagine that we had the data to support that we are selling a product that is harmful to the American public and we had that data, that we would continue to sell that product. & # 39;

What is an e-cigarette and how does it differ from smoking tobacco?

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An electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) is a device that allows users to inhale nicotine by heating a vapor from a solution containing nicotine, propylene and flavorings.

Because there is no burning, there is no smoke like a traditional cigarette.

But although they are branded as a lower risk than cigarettes, an increasing stream of investigations shows health hazards.

E-cigarettes do not produce tar or carbon monoxide, but the vapor does contain some harmful chemicals.

Nicotine is the highly addictive chemical that makes it difficult for smokers to quit.

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Nearly three million people in the UK use e-cigarettes and more than nine million Americans.

TYPES:

1. Standard e-cigarette

Battery-powered device containing nicotine e-liquid.

It evaporates flavored nicotine liquid.

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2. Juul

Very similar to normal e-cigarettes, but with a slimmer design and a higher concentration of nicotine.

Thanks to the & # 39; nicotine salts & # 39; manufacturers claim that one pod delivers the amount of nicotine as a pack of cigarettes.

It consists of an e-cigarette (battery and temperature control) and a pod e-liquid that is introduced at the end.

The liquid contains nicotine, chemicals and flavorings.

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Like other evaporation devices, it evaporates the e-liquid.

3. IQOS by Philip Morris

Pen-shaped, charged like an iPod.

Evaporated tobacco.

It is known as a & # 39; heat not burn & # 39; smokeless device that heats but does not burn tobacco (at 350 ° C compared to 600 ° C as normal cigarettes do).

The company claims that this method reduces the exposure of users to carcinogenic burning tobacco.

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