Categories: Health

Just ONE wine or beer a day may raise stroke risk by a FIFTH, study suggests

Just ONE wine or beer a day may raise stroke risk by a FIFTH, study suggests

  • People who drank 105 g of alcohol per week were considered moderate drinkers
  • Equivalent to almost six pints of beer, eight small glasses of wine or nine shots
  • Team of Seoul National University analyzed records from a national database

Young people who drink just one drink a day can increase their risk of stroke by a fifth, experts warn.

According to new research, people in their 20s and 30s who drink moderate to heavy amounts of alcohol are more likely to have a stroke than those who drink little or no amounts.

A team from Seoul National University analyzed data from a Korean national database for young adults who had undergone four annual health screenings and were asked about their alcohol consumption.

Those who drank 105 g or more of alcohol per week were considered moderate or heavy drinkers.

This equates to nearly six pints of medium strength beer, eight small glasses of wine, or about nine large shots of spirits — about one drink a day.

Of the 1.5 million participants, a total of 3,153 had a stroke during the six-year study period.

Young people who drink just one drink a day can increase their risk of stroke by a fifth, experts warn. People in their 20s and 30s who drink moderate to heavy amounts of alcohol are more likely to have a stroke than those who drink little or no amounts (stock image)

Low sugar does NOT mean less drink

Alcoholic drinks labeled as low-sugar mislead women into thinking they’re healthy, a study suggests.

Scientists from the University of Melbourne recruited more than 500 women to test their perception of products claiming to be low in sugar.

Half were shown images of premixed drinks with a low sugar claim or similar and the other half looked at identical ‘regular’ products.

They were then asked to rate the drinks from 1 to 7 on a series of questions about their overall health.

Products with low sugar claims were rated as significantly lower in sugar, less harmful to health and more suitable for weight management, although there was no evidence to support the claims.

Related Post

Despite the participants being informed that all products had an equivalent alcohol content, those with a low sugar claim were rated as significantly lower in alcohol, according to the findings published in the journal Alcohol and alcoholism.

Analysis found that those who were moderate to heavy drinkers for two or more years were about 20 percent more likely to have a stroke than those who drank less or none at all.

As the number of years of moderate to heavy drinking increased, so did the risk of stroke.

People with two years of moderate to heavy drinking had a 19 percent increased risk, those with three years had a 22 percent increased risk, and people with four years had a 23 percent increased risk.

The association was mainly due to an increased risk of hemorrhagic stroke – or a stroke caused by bleeding in the brain.

These results came after researchers took into account other factors that can influence stroke risk, such as high blood pressure, smoking and body mass index.

British charity Stroke reports that one in five people with a stroke is now under 55 years of age.

Study author Eue-Keun Choi said: ‘The number of strokes among young adults has increased in recent decades, and stroke in young adults causes death and severe disability.

“Since more than 90 percent of the total burden of stroke can be attributed to potentially modifiable risk factors, including alcohol consumption, and since stroke in young adults has serious consequences for both the individual and society by limiting their activities during their most productive years.” limit alcohol consumption should be emphasized in young adults with heavy drinking habits as part of any stroke prevention strategy.”

In the journal Neurology, the researchers write that there are several possible mechanisms that could explain the link between alcohol and stroke.

Drinking a lot of alcohol can lead to hypertension – high blood pressure – which in turn can be a major risk factor for stroke.

Alcohol can also increase the chance of atrial fibrillation, which can cause an irregular heartbeat and, in turn, increase the risk of stroke.

The researchers said their study was limited to include only Korean people, meaning the risk may not be transferred to other races and ethnicities.

Participants also filled out questionnaires and may have forgotten how much alcohol they drank.

In the UK it is recommended that adults should not drink more than 14 units of alcohol per week on a regular basis.

Merry

Recent Posts

Ben Roberts-Smith receives Queen’s Platinum Jubilee Medal as he awaits defamation verdict

Ben Roberts-Smith shines as Australia's most decorated soldier receives a rare royal award – as…

9 mins ago

Tom Parker’s widow Kelsey struggled with loneliness and guilt after The Wanted star’s death

Kelsey Parker has admitted she struggles with feelings of loneliness and guilt following the death…

11 mins ago

Sexual assault charge brought by Brittany Higgins against Bruce Lehrmann is dropped

Rape charges against accused attacker Brittany Higgins will be DROPPED and his retrial dropped -…

29 mins ago

Amanda Holden and Ashley Roberts don Nutcracker costumes for Heart’s Christmas countdown

Amanda Holden and Ashley Roberts got into the festive spirit as they celebrated Heat Breakfast…

33 mins ago

McSweeney hits maiden first-class hundred, Weatherald cracks own century

South Australia 8 for 309 (McSweeney 118, Weatherald 100) vs TasmaniaTasmania wicketkeeper Jake Doran left…

35 mins ago

Iranian man ‘shot in the head’ by security forces for celebrating US World Cup win

For free real-time breaking news alerts sent straight to your inbox, sign up for our…

39 mins ago