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Julie Lamberg-Burnet (photo) explains the common mistake that people make when eating with others

Julie Lamberg-Burnet (photo) explains the common mistake that people make when eating with others

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Julie Lamberg-Burnet (photo) explains the common mistake that people make when eating with others

Every day there are a large number of rules for labeling restaurants near homes, business lunches and formal events throughout the country.

And although many are aware of the basics, there are many more advanced rules that people often forget.

According to the Australian expert, Julie Lamberg-Burnet, an understanding of etiquette can guide you in the right direction, regardless of the occasion.

& # 39; Etiquette should not be confused with outdated behavior – it's about being respectful, kind and aware, & # 39; Lamberg-Burnet told FEMAIL.

The founder and CEO of the Sydney School of Protocol lists the common mistakes that people make, such as cutting bread at the table and adding herbs to food without having tasted it first.

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1. Start eating for your host

Although it can be tempting to pick up your fork as soon as you are served, you should always avoid this.

Mrs. Lamberg-Burnet said it is better to be the second person to eat than the first, and it is more respectful for your host to wait until they have started.

& # 39; Too eager to both attack the bakery or start your meal before others show a lack of awareness, & # 39; she said.

Never put your napkin in your shirt collar as this is considered the height of rudeness

Never put your napkin in your shirt collar as this is considered the height of rudeness

Never put your napkin in your shirt collar as this is considered the height of rudeness

2. Place your napkin incorrectly – on yourself and on the table

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It is often said ways are concerned about the smaller details, a principle that applies to how you place your napkin.

The expert advised that you only take a napkin off the table if your host does, and always discreetly place it on your lap, with the fold closest to your waist.

She said that under no circumstances should a napkin ever be placed in the top of a shirt collar or used as a handkerchief.

At the end of the meal, this item does not have to be refolded, but it must be placed to the left of your place setting.

& # 39; Pick up the napkin in the middle and place it loosely on the left side of your place setting or in the middle of the place setting when the plate is removed. & # 39;

What are the biggest mistakes in etiquette pleasure that people make?

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1. Too eager to eat bakery products or start eating for others or your host

2. Use the napkin as a handkerchief or put it in the top of your shirt collar

3. Hold your knife in the same way as a pencil or talk to your cutlery

4. Cutting or slicing a roll when it is to be divided into two or three pieces

5. Add spices to your food without making sure you have tasted it first

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6. Hold wine and champagne glasses by the bowl instead of by the stem (this is permitted when drinking red wine)

7. Have a mobile on the table or dominate the conversation

8. Scrape and stack plates at the end of a meal while sitting at the table

3. Hold your knife and fork in the wrong way

When it comes to keeping cutlery, there is a right and wrong way.

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Mrs. Lamberg-Burnet explained that the correct way to hold cutlery is to place the fork in your left hand and the knife in the right.

She said that even if you are left-handed, you must practice and become proficient by using the fork on the left and the knife on the right.

In addition, the expert urges you to hold onto your knife as if it were a pencil, explaining it, as well as the fork, should rest & # 39; between the index finger and the thumb.

If you need to take a break during the meal, always place your cutlery in the "rest position" (the cutlery is placed over the plate).

When you have finished eating, place the cutlery in the "finished" position (the cutlery is placed next to each other).

Mrs. Lamberg-Burnet added desserts to be eaten using the dessert spoon and fork.

If you get bread with your meal, it should be divided into two or three smaller pieces instead of being cut into it

If you get bread with your meal, it should be divided into two or three smaller pieces instead of being cut into it

If you get bread with your meal, it should be divided into two or three smaller pieces instead of being cut into it

4. Cut into a sandwich instead of breaking it with your hands

If you get bread with your meal, you should never cut it, the expert said.

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Instead, the etiquette dictates that you bake bread in two or three bite-sized pieces and butter with the spread that you have taken from a dish and placed on the side of your plate.

& # 39; Do not take the butter directly from the "public" butter dish or oil plate directly onto your bread. & # 39;

Although you may be tempted to add salt and pepper before you have tasted it, it is a good way to do this.

Although you may be tempted to add salt and pepper before you have tasted it, it is a good way to do this.

Although you may be tempted to add salt and pepper before you have tasted it, it is a good way to do this.

5. First serve yourself and season food without tasting

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When food is brought around the table, have others serve themselves for you and serve dishes for them.

And no matter how hungry you are, do not eat food. Instead, show a little restraint by taking small bites before you start the next one.

Mrs. Lamberg-Burnet also said that under no circumstances should you season food with salt and pepper before you taste it.

& # 39; When you pass the condiments to another guest, you offer both salt and pepper to each other. & # 39;

6. Hold glassware incorrectly

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If you use a network, it is important to hold your glasses correctly, especially champagne glasses.

& # 39; If you drink from curdled glassware, such as with Champagne and wine, hold the glassware by the stem instead of around the glass dish & # 39 ;, said the expert.

When you drink red wine, it is acceptable to place your hands around the glass dish, as using your hands to & # 39; heat & # 39; the taste can improve.

When drinking from curdled glassware, such as for Champagne and wine, hold the glassware by the stem instead of around the bowl of the glass

When drinking from curdled glassware, such as for Champagne and wine, hold the glassware by the stem instead of around the bowl of the glass

When drinking from curdled glassware, such as for Champagne and wine, hold the glassware by the stem instead of around the bowl of the glass

7. Dominate the conversation and have a cell phone on the table

No matter how fixed you are on your phone, there is no room for it at a dining table, Mrs. Lamberg-Burnet said.

She added that this rule applies to other items, including sunglasses, keys, wallets, and other personal items.

The expert also touched the conversation rules at the dining table, noting that it was important to speak with those on your left and right, and no matter how good a race mechanic thinks you are, avoid the temptation to keep your word.

8. Jump to clear the table when the meal is ready

When a meal ends, your host may not appreciate it when you leave the table, although you think it is appropriate to help you do the dishes.

According to Lamberg-Burnet, this not only disrupts conversation flow, but it can also disrupt a carefully created atmosphere.

She adds that it is also better to prevent the plates from being scraped and stacked at the table.

& # 39; Remember that dining is less about food and more about conversation. & # 39;

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