Judge blocks the rules for the coverage of Trump's birth control in 13 …

Judge blocks the rules for the coverage of Trump's birth control in 13 states

Associated Press

OAKLAND, California (AP) – A US court in California has blocked the Trump management rules, allowing more employers to opt to provide women with no cost-compromise entry in 13 states and Washington D.C.

Judge Haywood Gilliam filed a request for interim relief on Sunday by California, 12 other states and Washington, D.C. The plaintiffs tried to prevent the rules from entering into force as scheduled on Monday, while a lawsuit against them progressed.

But Gilliam rejected their request to block the rules nationwide.

California and the other states claim that the changes would force women to turn to state-funded programs for contraception and lead to accidental pregnancies.

The US Department of Justice says the rules protect a small group of attackers from violating their beliefs.

FILE - In this August 26, 2016, file photo, a one-month dosage of hormonal contraceptive pills will be displayed in Sacramento, California. An American judge will hear arguments about California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration, allowing more employers to work to make religious objections to birth control benefits.
The rules go into effect on Monday January 14, 2019. (AP Photo / Rich Pedroncelli, File)

FILE - In this August 26, 2016, file photo, a one-month dosage of hormonal contraceptive pills will be displayed in Sacramento, California. An American judge will hear arguments about California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration, allowing more employers to work to make religious objections to birth control benefits.
The rules go into effect on Monday January 14, 2019. (AP Photo / Rich Pedroncelli, File)

FILE – In this August 26, 2016, file photo, a one-month dosage of hormonal contraceptive pills will be displayed in Sacramento, California. An American judge will hear arguments about California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration, allowing more employers to work to make religious objections to birth control benefits. The rules go into effect on Monday January 14, 2019. (AP Photo / Rich Pedroncelli, File)

FILE - On this file photo of March 25, 2015, Margot Riphagen from New Orleans, La., Is wearing a costume for contraceptive pills during a protest before the US Supreme Court in Washington. A judge in the US will have a fight on Friday, January 11, 2019, about California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration, allowing more employers to opt for free contraception for women. The new rules will enter into force on Monday January 14, 2019. (AP Photo / Charles Dharapak, File)

FILE – On this file photo of March 25, 2015, Margot Riphagen from New Orleans, La., Is wearing a costume for contraceptive pills during a protest before the US Supreme Court in Washington. A judge in the US will have a fight on Friday, January 11, 2019, about California's attempt to block new rules by the Trump administration, allowing more employers to opt for free contraception for women. The new rules will enter into force on Monday January 14, 2019. (AP Photo / Charles Dharapak, File)

Sorry, we currently do not accept comments on this article.

.