Judge blocks the rules for the coverage of Trump's birth control in 13 …

Californian federal judge blocks the new contraceptive rules from Trump administration that grant exemptions for coverage due to "moral beliefs & # 39; coming into effect in 13 states plus Washington, DC

  • The Californian federal judge Haywood Gilliam has filed a request for a provisional order by California, 12 other states and Washington DC on Sunday
  • New rules would extend the exemptions for birth control coverage of employers with "moral beliefs & # 39; as a basis to no longer provide
  • The rules would have been in force everywhere on Monday, but are now being postponed for the time being in Washington, DC, plus the 13 prosecutors
  • California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington were mentioned

Stephanie Haney for Dailymail.com

and
Associated Press

A US court in California blocked President Donald Trump's administration regulations on Sunday, which would allow more employers to give women contraception free of charge by claiming their moral convictions & # 39; violates by operating in 13 states and Washington DC.

Judge Haywood Gilliam, a district judge from the United States of the US district court for the northern district of California, has filed a petition for a provisional order from California, twelve other states and Washington DC.

The plaintiffs tried to prevent the rules from taking effect as planned on Monday, while a lawsuit against them was launched.

The law can not be clearer – employers have no business involvement with the decisions of women in health care, & # 39; said Attorney General California, Xavier Becerra, in a statement on Sunday.

Gilliam limited the scope of the ruling to the plaintiffs, but rejects their request to block the national rules.

The ruling covers California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Minnesota, New York, North Carolina, Rhode Island, Vermont, Virginia, Washington and the District of Columbia.

A US court in California blocked President Donald Trump's administration regulations on Sunday, which would allow more employers to give women contraception free of charge by claiming their moral convictions & # 39; violates by operating in 13 states and Washington DC. Trump is portrayed in the White House cabinet room on January 11 in Washington, DC

As a result of the changes, more employers, including listed companies, could opt to offer women a free contraception by claiming religious objections.

Some private employers could also object on moral grounds.

California and the other states state that women should turn to state-funded programs for contraception and experiencing unintended pregnancies.

& Today's verdict is a new attempt by the Trump administration to trample women's access to basic reproductive care, said Becerra.

& # 39; It's 2019, but the Trump government is still trying to turn women's rights back. Our coalition will continue to fight to ensure that women have access to reproductive health care that is guaranteed by law. & # 39;

The law can not be clearer - employers have no business involvement with the decisions of women in health care, & # 39; said Attorney General California, Xavier Becerra, in a statement on Sunday. Becerra is pictured on October 10 in Sacramento, California

The law can not be clearer - employers have no business involvement with the decisions of women in health care, & # 39; said Attorney General California, Xavier Becerra, in a statement on Sunday. Becerra is pictured on October 10 in Sacramento, California

The law can not be clearer – employers have no business involvement with the decisions of women in health care, & # 39; said Attorney General California, Xavier Becerra, in a statement on Sunday. Becerra is pictured on October 10 in Sacramento, California

At a hearing on Friday, Judge Haywood Gilliam said that the changes would result in a "substantial number". women who lose birth control, which is a huge policy change & # 39; would be. A file photo of August 26, 2916 shows a one-month dose of hormonal contraceptive pills shown in Sacramento, California

At a hearing on Friday, Judge Haywood Gilliam said that the changes would result in a "substantial number". women who lose birth control, which is a huge policy change & # 39; would be. A file photo of August 26, 2916 shows a one-month dose of hormonal contraceptive pills shown in Sacramento, California

At a hearing on Friday, Judge Haywood Gilliam said that the changes would result in a "substantial number". women who lose birth control, which is a huge policy change & # 39; would be. A file photo of August 26, 2916 shows a one-month dose of hormonal contraceptive pills shown in Sacramento, California

The US Department of Justice said in a lawsuit that the rules & # 39; protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objections against being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs.

At issue is a requirement under the health care law of President Barack Obama that birth control services are covered at no additional cost.

Obama officials included waivers for religious organizations. The Trump administration expanded these exemptions and added 'moral beliefs & # 39; as a basis for no longer offering birth control services.

During a hearing on Friday, Gilliam said the changes would result in a "substantial number of & # 39; women who lose birth control, which is a huge policy shift & # 39; would be.

The judge previously blocked an interim version of the rules – a decision that was confirmed by a court of appeal in December.

The US Department of Justice said in a lawsuit that the rules & # 39; protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objections against being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs. Margot Riphagen from New Orleans, Louisiana, wore a costume for contraceptive pills during a protest before the American Supreme Court in Washington, DC on March 25, 2015

The US Department of Justice said in a lawsuit that the rules & # 39; protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objections against being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs. Margot Riphagen from New Orleans, Louisiana, wore a costume for contraceptive pills during a protest before the American Supreme Court in Washington, DC on March 25, 2015

The US Department of Justice said in a lawsuit that the rules & # 39; protect a narrow class of sincere religious and moral objections against being forced to facilitate practices that conflict with their beliefs. Margot Riphagen from New Orleans, Louisiana, wore a costume for contraceptive pills during a protest before the American Supreme Court in Washington, DC on March 25, 2015

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