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Jodi Kantor (left) Megan Twohey (right), New York Times journalists who uncovered various allegations of sexual misconduct against film maker Harvey Weinstein in 2017

The New York Times journalists, who have uncovered various allegations of sexual misconduct against film maker Harvey Weinstein, have revealed the extraordinary efforts to prevent them from publishing their story.

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New York-based reporters Megan Twohey and Jodi Kantor appeared on Loose Women to talk about their article in 2017, which prompted the international # MeToo campaign to denounce sexual harassment and abuse.

Kantor, 44, claimed that the producer once employed an actress who was part of a spy agency – to pretend to be a British women's rights activist and to seek information about the allegations of them and their sources.

The pair also told how Hollywood star film star Gwyneth Paltrow played an important role in the investigation, once considered the face of Weinstein's first film company, Miramax.

Jodi Kantor (left) Megan Twohey (right), New York Times journalists who uncovered various allegations of sexual misconduct against film maker Harvey Weinstein in 2017

Jodi Kantor (left) Megan Twohey (right), New York Times journalists who uncovered various allegations of sexual misconduct against film maker Harvey Weinstein in 2017

The former film producer is co-founder of the entertainment company Miramax and The Weinstein Company, he has unambiguously denied all allegations of sexual misconduct

The former film producer is co-founder of the entertainment company Miramax and The Weinstein Company, he has unambiguously denied all allegations of sexual misconduct

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The former film producer is co-founder of the entertainment company Miramax and The Weinstein Company, he has unambiguously denied all allegations of sexual misconduct

Kantor said: “He used different methods and the fascinating thing was that some were visible, such as the gigantic teams of lawyers and PR people we were confronted with.

& # 39; There was actually a point before we published that he invaded the New York Times office uninvited.

& # 39; We received a phone call that he was on his way to the office. We had something like "What is he coming here, let's take him up".

& # 39; But then there were the methods that we could not see. He used this desk called Black Cube.

They are essentially paid private spies, they had an agent who was a sort of actress posing as a British champion of women's rights, who came to me to some of our sources to get information. & # 39;

New York-based reporters appeared on Loose Women to talk about their 2017 article, which triggered the Me Too international campaign, to denounce sexual harassment and abuse.

New York-based reporters appeared on Loose Women to talk about their 2017 article, which triggered the Me Too international campaign, to denounce sexual harassment and abuse.

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New York-based reporters appeared on Loose Women to talk about their 2017 article, which triggered the Me Too international campaign, to denounce sexual harassment and abuse.

When they asked if they had ever feared for their own safety while facing one of the most powerful men in Hollywood, the women admitted that the more Weinstein pushed back, the more eager they were to publish the story.

However, the couple feared for their sources and found that the mogul could use methods at the last minute to prevent the story from breaking.

Twohey said: & We were not afraid of ourselves, we are journalists, we wake up every morning and want to call the powerful to account.

& # 39; We do not shrink in the face of intimidation and threats, in fact it is motivating – but there was fear that we had before the end of our sources. & # 39;

They were questioned by Jane Morre (far left) and guest panelist Ricky Lake (left) if they ever feared for their own safety while facing one of the most powerful men in Hollywood
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They were questioned by Jane Morre (far left) and guest panelist Ricky Lake (left) if they ever feared for their own safety while facing one of the most powerful men in Hollywood

They were questioned by Jane Morre (far left) and guest panelist Ricky Lake (left) if they ever feared for their own safety while facing one of the most powerful men in Hollywood

& # 39; When we went to Weinstein and told him what we would publish.

& # 39; That really started a 48-hour period in which all women were vulnerable to one of those last-minute tactics he was going to take. & # 39;

Kantor further explained that it was when Paltrow, 47, came forward to claim that the producer had sexually harassed her at the age of 22 when she was given a role in the Jane Austen adaptation & # 39; Emma & # 39; , that they realized that & # 39; no one is immune & # 39 ;.

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She said: & # 39; There were many surprising figures, the people who helped bring the truth to life.

Paltrow, 47, came forward to claim that the producer had sexually harassed her at the age of 22 when she was given a role in the Jane Austen adaptation & # 39; Emma & # 39;

Paltrow, 47, came forward to claim that the producer had sexually harassed her at the age of 22 when she was given a role in the Jane Austen adaptation & # 39; Emma & # 39;

Paltrow, 47, came forward to claim that the producer had sexually harassed her at the age of 22 when she was given a role in the Jane Austen adaptation & # 39; Emma & # 39;

She made nine films with Miramax and is screened in 1999 after winning an Academy Award for her role in the & # 39; Shakespeare in Love & # 39; produced by Weinstein.

She made nine films with Miramax and is screened in 1999 after winning an Academy Award for her role in the & # 39; Shakespeare in Love & # 39; produced by Weinstein.

She made nine films with Miramax and is screened in 1999 after winning an Academy Award for her role in the & # 39; Shakespeare in Love & # 39; produced by Weinstein.

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& # 39; She was one of the surprising secret sources we have, she was seen as his biggest star.

So when she quietly started telling us that she had been one of his supposed victims, we realized that nobody was immune.

& # 39; She really not only shared her own story, but she also called her friends in Hollywood and beyond to see if there were other women who could help us with our research. & # 39;

The couple was later questioned whether the star, who won an Academy Award in 1999 for her role in the Shakespeare in Love & # 39; produced by Weinstein, felt guilty about her involvement with the producer.

Kantor explained that it was not until Paltrow went into the report and said she had not bowed to Weinstein's sexual pressure, that other women were coming forward – to say that he had used her name in vain & # 39 ;

She said: & # 39; The biggest shock for Gwyneth was not the shock we discovered during the investigation, but afterwards.

& # 39; Because what we started to hear, especially after we broke the story, is that he went to women in the course of sexual pressure and said, "Everyone does it".

(He said) How do you think she got that Oscar? which means that they have slept together.

& # 39; So when she took the deed and said she said no to him, all those other women came out and said & # 39; he used your name in vain & # 39 ;.

All accusations of unconscious sex are unequivocally denied by Mr. Weinstein.

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