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In November 1941, when Soviet leader Josef Stalin had the cheek to criticize the quality of tanks and guns sent from Britain to help the Russian forces - Prime Minister Winston Churchill had reached the limit of his patience

How Josef Stalin Winston Churchill sent a birthday card to say sorry for the Second World War about the quality of British tanks

  • The wartime relationship between Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin was tense
  • In 1941, the Soviet leader criticized the quality of the British equipment sent to Russia
  • He realizes his mistake and Stalin tries to apologize by sending a very different birthday card
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Their alliance was vital to stop Hitler.

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But the tashy war relationship between Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin was often stretched to the limit.

In November 1941, when the Soviet leader had the cheek to criticize the quality of tanks and guns sent from Great Britain to help the Russian forces, the Prime Minister had reached the limit of his patience.

Fortunately, Stalin realized that he had gone too far and had taken advantage of the fact that Churchill's 67th birthday was imminent for a spectacular & # 39; card & # 39; as a conciliatory measure.

In November 1941, when Soviet leader Josef Stalin had the cheek to criticize the quality of tanks and guns sent from Britain to help the Russian forces - Prime Minister Winston Churchill had reached the limit of his patience

In November 1941, when Soviet leader Josef Stalin had the cheek to criticize the quality of tanks and guns sent from Britain to help the Russian forces – Prime Minister Winston Churchill had reached the limit of his patience

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The coded telegram read: & # 39; To the Prime Minister Winston Churchill, congratulations on your birthday. From the bottom of my heart I wish you strength and health that are so necessary for the victory over the enemy of humanity, Hitlerism. Accept my best wishes, Stalin. & # 39;

The greeting, which could be the most crucial birthday message in history, was most likely suggested by Stalin's ambassador to Britain, Ivan Maisky, the historian David Reynolds explained.

& # 39; Stalin is not known for sending birthday wishes. Certainly not for a capitalist imperialist who was known for threatening to strangle Bolshevism, & he told the Chalke Valley History Festival, sponsored by the Daily Mail.

Fortunately, Stalin realized that he had gone too far and took advantage of the fact that Churchill's 67th birthday was imminent to send a flowing ┬┐card as a conciliatory measure

Fortunately, Stalin realized that he had gone too far and took advantage of the fact that Churchill's 67th birthday was imminent to send a flowing ┬┐card as a conciliatory measure

Fortunately, Stalin realized that he had gone too far and took advantage of the fact that Churchill's 67th birthday was imminent for a popping & # 39; card & # 39; as a conciliatory measure

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& # 39; My assumption is that Maisky, the ambassador, told Stalin that it was Churchill's birthday and perhaps encouraged messages like this.

& # 39; Maisky was very useful with things like this. In any case, it is an extremely smart trick – Stalin will certainly not admit that he made the switch early, but it is clearly changing the mood in a way that is very important in closing. & # 39;

The birthday wishes seemed to work and the relationship was saved. Churchill responded to the message Stalin thanked and explained that the greeting brought him & # 39; lively pleasure & # 39; gave.

The revelation was made by historian David Reynolds during the Chalke Valley History Festival, which is sponsored by the Daily Mail

The revelation was made by historian David Reynolds during the Chalke Valley History Festival, which is sponsored by the Daily Mail

The revelation was made by historian David Reynolds during the Chalke Valley History Festival, which is sponsored by the Daily Mail

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The Prime Minister replied to Stalin's birthday the following month and the exchange of greetings became a tradition that continued even after the end of the Second World War.

& # 39; I think the last birthday message in the 1940s was sent by Churchill in the fall of 1946 after his speech & # 39; Iron Curtain & # 39;, & # 39; said Professor Reynolds, fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge, and co-author of The Kremlin Letters.

Politicians who are currently engaged in complicated negotiations with Brussels on Brexit could learn from the calculated diplomacy of correspondence between the uncomfortable mediated allies, he added.

& # 39; Brussels says nothing can be changed, the deal is on the table.

& # 39; What you must at least calculate is how much of it is real and how much is bluff, and that was what those guys were supposed to do at the time.

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& # 39; I think both Stalin and Churchill have really worked in diplomacy. & # 39; They have set on time, they have thought about it. They read their assignment, they read their proof. You can't do serious diplomacy just by trying. & # 39;

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