John Bash defends a Jewish-Mexican wife accused of white supremacy

Brett Kavanaugh's former secretary, Zina Bash, appears in the photo behind the Supreme Court nominee at his hearing on Tuesday. She is accused of making a gesture with her right hand up

John Bash gave the hammer to sharp-eyed liberals on Tuesday after they accused his wife of waving white supremacy during the hearing for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

The US prosecutor said on social media that neither he nor his Jewish-Mexican wife, Zina Bash, had any idea what the hateful signal meant until suddenly it was punished on Twitter for supposedly having succeeded.

Zina, who previously served as Kavanaugh's legal assistant, sat directly behind him at the court hearing with her arms folded. His right hand was apparently positioned in an "OK" sign, which is commonly associated with the members on the right.

Her furious husband later criticized the claims and said they are "idiotic and sickly," adding that she hopes "people will clearly condemn them."

Brett Kavanaugh's former secretary, Zina Bash, appears in the photo behind the Supreme Court nominee at his hearing on Tuesday. She is accused of making a gesture with her right hand up

Brett Kavanaugh's former secretary, Zina Bash, appears in the photo behind the Supreme Court nominee at his hearing on Tuesday. She is accused of making a gesture with her right hand up

Zina's right hand is apparently placed in an "OK" sign, which some claim is on purpose. Her husband described the accusations against his Mexican-Jewish wife as "idiotic and sickly"

Zina's right hand is apparently placed in an "OK" sign, which some claim is on purpose. Her husband described the accusations against his Mexican-Jewish wife as "idiotic and sickly"

Zina's right hand is apparently placed in an "OK" sign, which some claim is on purpose. Her husband described the accusations against his Mexican-Jewish wife as "idiotic and sickly"

The American lawyer said that neither he nor Zina had any idea what the hateful sign meant until they scolded her on Twitter

The American lawyer said that neither he nor Zina had any idea what the hateful sign meant until they scolded her on Twitter

The American lawyer said that neither he nor Zina had any idea what the hateful sign meant until they scolded her on Twitter

He wrote in a Twitter statement: "Today's attacks on my wife are repulsive." Everyone who tweets this vicious conspiracy theory should be ashamed of themselves.

"We were not even familiar with the odious symbol that was attributed to him because of the random manner in which his hand rested during a long hearing.

Zina is Mexican on the part of her mother and Jewish on the part of her father. She was born in Mexico. His grandparents were survivors of the Holocaust.

Cato Institute partner Ilya Shapiro also intervened: "My friend Zina Bash, whose father is a Polish American Jew (whose parents escaped the Holocaust) and her mother immigrated from Mexico, is not a white supremacist."

John, seen on the left in Texas in March 2018, said "Zina (in her Facebook and LinkedIn picture) is Mexican on her mother's side and Jewish on her father's side, she was born in Mexico, her grandparents were survivors of the Holocaust

Outgoing White House counselor Don McGahn (R) and Zina Bash observe during the confirmation hearing of the US Senate Judiciary Committee. UU For Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice in the US Supreme Court. UU., On Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 4, 2018

Outgoing White House counselor Don McGahn (R) and Zina Bash observe during the confirmation hearing of the US Senate Judiciary Committee. UU For Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice in the US Supreme Court. UU., On Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 4, 2018

Outgoing White House counselor Don McGahn (R) and Zina Bash observe during the confirmation hearing of the US Senate Judiciary Committee. UU For Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice in the US Supreme Court. UU., On Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 4, 2018

Bash and White House attorney Don McGahn listen during the September 4, 2018 hearing in Washington, DC

Bash and White House attorney Don McGahn listen during the September 4, 2018 hearing in Washington, DC

Bash and White House attorney Don McGahn listen during the September 4, 2018 hearing in Washington, DC

Kavanaugh delivers her keynote speech during the confirmation hearing of the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 4, 2018

Kavanaugh delivers her keynote speech during the confirmation hearing of the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 4, 2018

Kavanaugh delivers her keynote speech during the confirmation hearing of the Supreme Court on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on September 4, 2018

John went on to assure the public that his family does not participate in hate groups that "pretend to terrorize and humiliate other people."

He added directly: "I never did it and I never would."

The former associate lawyer of President Trump also said that the malicious comments were directed at his daughter for whatever reason.

"Some of the comments on Twitter have even referred to our baby daughter … I know there are good people on both sides of the political divide," concluded the US attorney. UU In your message.

Harvard law graduate Zina has not commented personally on the matter.

Kavanaugh (C) is escorted by Deputy Director of Legislative Affairs Amy Swonger (L) and White House employee Bash (R) as she heads to a meeting on Capitol Hill on July 11, 2018 in Washington, DC

Kavanaugh (C) is escorted by Deputy Director of Legislative Affairs Amy Swonger (L) and White House employee Bash (R) as she heads to a meeting on Capitol Hill on July 11, 2018 in Washington, DC

Kavanaugh (C) is escorted by Deputy Director of Legislative Affairs Amy Swonger (L) and White House employee Bash (R) as she heads to a meeting on Capitol Hill on July 11, 2018 in Washington, DC

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