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From healthy to hospitalized in 24 hours: Anstey Campbell was diagnosed with a rare syndrome after feeling & # 39; pins and needles & # 39; in January (shown before and in the hospital)

A jogger who noticed that she had pins and needles while running remained paralyzed and locked up for a month & # 39; in her body without communicating after she had felt the tingling for 24 hours.

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Pharmacist Anstey Campbell, from New Zealand's North Island, decided to start the morning of January 17 with a light jog before starting work, noting that the excitement did not disappear during lunch.

& # 39; Mid-afternoon it was within reach, so I went to a doctor because I thought it was weird & # 39 ;, said the 29-year-old.

& # 39; He suggested it was fear and would return the next day if it had not improved. & # 39;

But she didn't get the chance, because her body deteriorated at night and gave her chest and abdominal pain that led to a frantic hospital visit.

From healthy to hospitalized in 24 hours: Anstey Campbell was diagnosed with a rare syndrome after feeling & # 39; pins and needles & # 39; in January (shown before and in the hospital)

From healthy to hospitalized in 24 hours: Anstey Campbell was diagnosed with a rare syndrome after feeling & # 39; pins and needles & # 39; in January (shown before and in the hospital)

Campbell was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) in January, after her doctor thought she might have just suffered from anxiety (photo with her husband Levi)
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Campbell was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) in January, after her doctor thought she might have just suffered from anxiety (photo with her husband Levi)

Campbell was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) in January, after her doctor thought she might have just suffered from anxiety (photo with her husband Levi)

What is Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS)?

* GBS is a fast-acting muscle weakness caused by the immune system that attacks the nervous system.

* The first symptoms are usually painful tingling in the feet or hands, often & # 39; pins and needles & # 39; mentioned.

* The most important treatment options are blood transfusions and physical therapy.

& # 39; By that time, a feeling of weakness spread to my upper body and face & # 39 ;, she said.

& # 39; Within 15 minutes, the doctor diagnosed Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) and referred me to the emergency department of our nearest large hospital. & # 39;

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GBS is a rapid onset of muscle weakness caused by the immune system that attacks the nervous system.

The first symptoms are usually painful tingling in the feet or hands, just as Mrs. Campbell experienced.

Mrs. Campbell spent a month with & # 39; locking up & # 39; in her body, unable to communicate with her family or doctors (photo with Levi)

Mrs. Campbell spent a month with & # 39; locking up & # 39; in her body, unable to communicate with her family or doctors (photo with Levi)

Mrs. Campbell spent a month with & # 39; locking up & # 39; in her body, unable to communicate with her family or doctors (photo with Levi)

The 29-year-old pharmacist was put on a respirator for a total of 86 days (pictured with her husband Levi in ​​the hospital)

The 29-year-old pharmacist was put on a respirator for a total of 86 days (pictured with her husband Levi in ​​the hospital)

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The 29-year-old pharmacist was put on a respirator for a total of 86 days (pictured with her husband Levi in ​​the hospital)

& # 39; During the day I slowly became paralyzed from the legs to the top of my head. By the time I was intubated, I was so weak that I could barely open my eyelids, & she said.

While her breath became shallow, doctors decided to put Campbell in a coma to protect her lungs from further damage.

A few days later, Campbell suffered a tracheostomy – an incision in the neck – and was ventilated for 86 days.

& # 39; After being completely out for about a week, the doctors lowered my anesthetic and from what they saw, I didn't respond at all, but I was actually locked up, & # 39; she said.

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& # 39; It was the most frightening thing you can imagine. & # 39;

Locked In Syndrome (LiS) means that the consciousness and cortical functions of the patient remain normal, but with a complete inability to move or convey consciousness.

& # 39; I remember that the doctors tried all these tests to get some kind of reaction and it was really frightening when I realized I was in it. I tried to do what they told me, but nothing happened & she said.

With her eyes permanently closed, the only way to determine if it was day or night was to try and find out how many visitors were in the room

With her eyes permanently closed, the only way to determine if it was day or night was to try and find out how many visitors were in the room

The very first movement that returned was a small cramp in her jaw

The very first movement that returned was a small cramp in her jaw

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Mrs. Campbell felt uncomfortable while she was locked up (left) – and often in pain – but no one could tell

The New Zealand resident lived a happy and healthy life before being struck by illness

The New Zealand resident lived a happy and healthy life before being struck by illness

The New Zealand resident lived a happy and healthy life before being struck by illness

& # 39; I remember that the doctor hit my forehead hard to try to open my eyes, it was so painful and the only thing I said inside was & # 39; stop & # 39;. & # 39;

Mrs. Campbell felt uncomfortable – and often in pain – but could not tell anyone about it.

With her eyes permanently closed, the only way to determine if it was day or night was to try and find out how many visitors were in the room.

After four weeks, the first part she got was in her jaw, and she started shaking once to & # 39; yes & # 39; and twice to & # 39; no & # 39; to mean.

& # 39; When I woke up, I was told that I had been pretty ill and my case was serious, so it took me a while to get out of the ventilator and breathe for myself & # 39 ;, she said.

Slowly back to normal: & # 39; When I woke up, I was told that I had been pretty ill, and my case was serious, so it took me a while to get out of the fan and breathe for myself & # 39 ;, said she

Slowly back to normal: & # 39; When I woke up, I was told that I had been pretty ill, and my case was serious, so it took me a while to get out of the fan and breathe for myself & # 39 ;, said she

Slowly back to normal: & # 39; When I woke up, I was told that I had been pretty ill, and my case was serious, so it took me a while to get out of the fan and breathe for myself & # 39 ;, said she

Mrs. Campbell is still impatient 10 months after running that fateful run in January
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Mrs. Campbell is still impatient 10 months after running that fateful run in January

Mrs. Campbell is still impatient 10 months after running that fateful run in January

Mrs. Campbell is still in the hospital 10 months after her injury, but can go home every weekend for a break.

She has some strength in her upper body and recovered her movement since she did physiotherapy twice a day in the last six months.

& # 39; Some doctors have been positive and said that I would get most, if not all, of the functions back, while others said I would be in a wheelchair for a long time. But the common theme is that my recovery will take a long time, & she said.

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She cannot grasp anything with her hands yet and she cannot stand without help, but after a while Mrs Campbell hopes to move alone.

The most important treatment plan for GBS are blood transfusions and physical therapy.

& # 39; I spent a lot of time asking why this happened to me, but it didn't get me anywhere except that I felt resentment against the hand that was inflicted on me, "she said.

& # 39; If something unexpected happens in life, release the life you planned and accept the new story you can write. & # 39;

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) femail (t) New Zealand