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Joe Biden hurts Bernie Sanders to downplay the online vitriol of his supporters

Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden has criticized the behavior of online supporters of senator Bernie Sanders and said that his rival for the Democratic nomination for president has “some responsibility.”

Biden, in an interview with NBCs Meet the press on Saturday waded in a spit between supporters of Sanders and leaders of The Culinary Union, a powerful workers’ group in Nevada critical of the senator’s health proposals.

“He may not be responsible for it, but he does have some responsibility,” Biden said in the interview that airs on Sunday morning. “If one of my supporters did that, I would reject them. Don’t show them. The stuff that was said online, the way they threatened these two women who are leaders in that Culinary Union. It is outrageous. ”

Nevada holds the next nomination competition in the Democratic presidential primary.

Biden, in an interview with NBC's Meet the Press on Saturday, waded in a spit between supporters of Sanders and leaders of The Culinary Union

Biden, in an interview with NBC’s Meet the Press on Saturday, waded in a spit between supporters of Sanders and leaders of The Culinary Union

Biden has criticized the behavior of Senator Bernie Sanders’ online supporters and said that his rival for the Democratic nomination for president has “some responsibility”

Sanders speaks Saturday at a campaign meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada. The state will hold caucuses on February 22

Sanders speaks Saturday at a campaign meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada. The state will hold caucuses on February 22

Sanders speaks Saturday at a campaign meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada. The state will hold caucuses on February 22

Biden has seen his standing opinion polls disappear while Sanders has risen to the status of leader.

The Culinary Workers Union said Sanders supporters ‘maliciously’ attacked the organization through Twitter, texting, voicemail and direct messages after the union criticized the senator’s universal health care plan on Tuesday.

Sanders, in turn, called for an end to all online harassment, but stopped recognizing that the attacks came from his supporters.

Instead, Sanders suggested in an interview on Thursday’s “PBS NewsHour” that the attacks may have come from people posing as his supporters.

“Bullying of all forms is unacceptable to me and we urge supporters of all campaigns not to engage in bullying or ugly personal attacks,” he said in a statement.

Sanders added: “Everyone who attacks someone else in my name is not part of our movement. We don’t want them. And I’m not so sure, to be honest, that they are necessarily part of our movement. “

Sanders won the most votes this month in Democratic nomination competitions in Iowa and New Hampshire.

Leaders of the Culinary Workers Union are seen at a press conference on Thursday, where they announced that they would not endorse a candidate in the Democratic primary. The union said it received “cruel” abuse from supporters of Sanders about the decision

The next competitions in the state-to-state struggle to choose a candidate for Republican President Donald Trump in the November elections are in Nevada on February 22 and South Carolina on February 29.

Sanders’ opponents have often criticized his legion of online supporters for committing attacks, including those targeted at female candidates such as his 2020 rival Senator Elizabeth Warren and former Foreign Minister Hillary Clinton, who defeated him for the 2016 Democratic nomination.

He previously urged his supporters to participate in a social discourse, but his supporters have argued that they have been wrongly insulted.

The Nevada trade union, with oversized influence in a state highly dependent on tourism, said on Thursday that it would not endorse a presidential candidate, but warned its members that Sanders’ Medicare for All proposal would replace private health insurance with a government managed program may jeopardize their hard-fought union protection.

The Culinary Union, a 60,000-strong group consisting of housekeepers, bartenders, porters, and others working in the casino resorts, is considered one of the most influential forces in state democratic politics. Democratic candidates have been aggressive in seeking support from the group.

Nationally, many unions have remained on the sidelines, in the first place, wary of standing behind a candidate in the absence of a clear leader.

Biden accused sanders of not restraining his supporters. Pictured: Sanders addresses his supporters at a massive gathering in Queens in October

Biden accused sanders of not restraining his supporters. Pictured: Sanders addresses his supporters at a massive gathering in Queens in October

Biden accused sanders of not restraining his supporters. Pictured: Sanders addresses his supporters at a massive gathering in Queens in October

Democratic presidential candidate former vice president Joe Biden, left, embraces Senator Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., As Senator Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Right looks on during the last debate

Democratic presidential candidate former vice president Joe Biden, left, embraces Senator Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., As Senator Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Right looks on during the last debate

Democratic presidential candidate former vice president Joe Biden, left, embraces Senator Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., As Senator Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Right looks on during the last debate

Composing fear is bad blood in 2016, when several unions supported Hillary Clinton early in the Democratic presidential competition to see Bernie Sanders rock and hear members’ complaints.

The Culinary Union has ignored the Democratic primary of 2016 after a division eight years earlier undermined its image as a well-oiled political machine.

Now that Unite Here International Union decides to remain neutral, the Las Vegas-based Culinary Union, the most closely connected local, can take the lead and sit outside again. D. Taylor, the international president of Unite Here, is the former head of the Culinary Union and is still a fixture at the events of the local people of Las Vegas.

In 2008, the Culinary Union waited for 10 days before the Nevada caucuses announced that it supported Barack Obama over Clinton. The decision was a blessing for Obama, but it caused division among the ranks of the union and had a dampened influence on the vote. Clinton won the popular voice in the state and had a strong show at the major caucus sites that were dominated by culinary members working on the Las Vegas Strip.

The leadership of the international union made the decision Tuesday at a meeting in Atlanta, said spokeswoman Annemarie Strassel.

In a statement, Unite Here said: “Every local endorsement in the primary will weigh the candidates’ views on the most important economic justice issues for our Union, such as support for the right to organize trade unions, immigration reform, criminal justice reform and training in the price of health care. “

The trade union’s decision to stay outside probably reflects strong division within its ranks for who is the best candidate. Trade unions are now in a similar role to the wider democratic electorate, still undecided among many options.

Democratic US presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks at a campaign meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on February 15, 2020

Democratic US presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks at a campaign meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on February 15, 2020

Democratic US presidential candidate Senator Bernie Sanders speaks at a campaign meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on February 15, 2020

As proof of this, a Unite Here partner issued its own approval on Tuesday for the statement of the international union. Unite Here Local 11 from Southern California endorsed Sanders and Elizabeth Warren together and said the two liberal candidates have a “record of service with Local 11 members in their struggles against corporate power.”

It was not the first Unite Here partner to participate in the presidential race. The New York branch of the union, the New York Hotel and Motel Trades Council, approved in June 2019 New York Mayor Bill de Blasio, who later stepped out of the presidential race.

Without the results of the first votes being cast, many unions and democratic voters still seem to be considering their options before joining a candidate.

“There is excitement about this election among the workers’ movement, and we take a close look at all the candidates and all the plans and set the bar very high,” said Tim Schlittner, a spokesperson for the AFL-CIO, who has not approved and does not know or it will work.

The Service Employees International Union also keeps fire. “The vast majority of SEIU members are still undecided about who can best meet their demands for the next president to take power away from companies and back to working people,” said the president, Mary Kay Henry. “Like voters across the country, they want to hear who’s going to fight to ensure that all families, regardless of skin color or where they were born, can thrive.”

Eddie Vale, a democratic agent who has worked in the labor movement for a long time, said that unions are hesitant because of “an embarrassment of wealth for labor.” Unlike previous cycles, democratic opponents have done their best to praise their kindness to trade unions. Labor “doesn’t have to put all their hopes and support into one candidate, and membership support is distributed among many people, so the incentives push approval,” Vale said.

The exceptions are the few international unions with long-term ties to candidates who have signed up, such as the International Association of Fire Fighters, which supported former vice president Joe Biden, or the National Nurses United, an old Sanders’ advocate who also endorsed him in 2016.

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