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Jingle bird! Hilarious moment Peach the lovebirds up and down in time to a tambourine

Jingle bird! Hilarious moment Peach the lovebirds up and down in time to a tambourine

  • A two-ounce bird was seen leaping up in Cottage Grove, Minnesota
  • Lovebird stiffened every time his owner put down the musical tambourine
  • Animal welfare experts say the birds should be kept in pairs because they are social

Peach the lovebird turned the heads in his childhood home after the bird began to bob its head and jump up and down on the jingle of a tambourine.

The two-ounce bird was filmed dancing on the instrument in Cottage Grove, Minnesota, and stopped moving as soon as it was dropped.

There was no sign of a partner for Peach in the video.

Animal welfare experts say the birds should be kept in pairs because they are ‘very social’. When this is not possible, they say that their “human flock” should provide the necessary level of social interaction.

Peach the lovebird raised his head and jumped up and down to the sound of the tambourine in Cottage Grove, Minnesota.

Peach the lovebird raised his head and jumped up and down to the sound of the tambourine in Cottage Grove, Minnesota.

The 60-second clip shows Peach jumping up and down excitedly over a bed enjoying the music.

Every time the owner stops shaking, the peach freezes Peach, as if he’s dancing DJ Casper’s 2009 hit Cha Cha Slide.

Animal welfare organization MSPCA-Angell says online lovebirds should be kept in pairs.

“These birds chat all day long,” they said. “They hide in their nest box when they are startled by a sudden noise, when they see a potential predator, or when it gets cold and windy.”

There was no sign of a partner for Peach in the video. Animal welfare experts recommend keeping lovebirds in pairs because they are 'very social'

There was no sign of a partner for Peach in the video. Animal welfare experts recommend keeping lovebirds in pairs because they are 'very social'

There was no sign of a partner for Peach in the video. Animal welfare experts recommend keeping lovebirds in pairs because they are ‘very social’

Peach is thought to be a lovebird from Fischer, or Agapornis fischeri, which is from East Africa.

The African Lovebird Society says of the species: ‘In the wild, Fischer’s lovebirds are found on the inner plateaus of northern Tanzania.

“In captivity they breed freely and are grown in large colonies.”

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