Jess Fox wins bronze in K1 canoe slalom final at Tokyo Olympics

Australian kayaker Jess Fox wins bronze in canoe slalom after complaining that wild weather made her feel like she was ‘paddling in bathwater’

  • Aussie Olympian Jess Fox won bronze in canoe slalom final on Tuesday evening
  • She previously stormed into the final with the fastest time in her semi-final – 105.85 seconds
  • The three-time K1 world champion who is still at the top of the Olympic podium
  • The 27-year-old won silver in London in 2012 and bronze in Rio four years later

Two-time Olympic medalist Jessica Fox has finished with a bronze medal in the K1 canoe slalom final in Tokyo.

The 27-year-old from Sydney’s west, who was listed as a $1.45 favorite to win the event, stormed into the final earlier on Tuesday afternoon with the fastest time in her semi-final – 105.85 seconds.

A three-time K1 world champion, Fox has not yet topped an Olympic podium, taking silver in London in 2012 and bronze in Rio four years later.

She entered the competition as a strong favorite after a qualifying time of 98.46 seconds, some three seconds faster than her closest rival, Germany’s Ricarda Funk.

A few time penalties proved crucial for Fox, who broke down shortly after the final.

Fox is pictured in the photo storming into the women's K1 canoe slalom on Tuesday afternoon with the fastest time in her semi-final - 105.85 seconds

Fox is pictured in the photo storming into the women’s K1 canoe slalom on Tuesday afternoon with the fastest time in her semi-final – 105.85 seconds

Fox, who is from Penrith, said the wild weather in Japan made it difficult to manage the track.

“It’s like a bath. It’s like paddling in bath water,” she said.

“It’s beautiful, it’s a great location, but the water is really warm, so it’s all about the ice baths and the ice towels and as much ice as possible.

‘I mean it gets pretty hot in Australia’s Penrith, but this is by far the hottest for me.’

Fox’s parents are both Olympians.

Her father, Richard, competed for Great Britain in K1 at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, finishing fourth and a five-time world champion.

Fox’s mother, Myriam, competed for France at the 1992 Barcelona and 1996 Atlanta Olympics, winning bronze in Atlanta in K1. She was a two-time world champion.

On Tuesday morning, swimming prodigy Kaylee McKeown continued the gold start of Australian women’s competitions by winning gold in the 100m backstroke final.

She overtook Canadian Kylie Masse in the 50m corner and was 0.19 seconds ahead of McKeown’s world record time, but couldn’t keep up with that pace and the 20-year-old stormed home for the win.

Fox pictured during the Tuesdau semifinal.  She entered the competition as a strong favorite after posting a qualifying time of 98.46 seconds

Fox pictured during the Tuesdau semifinal.  She entered the competition as a strong favorite after posting a qualifying time of 98.46 seconds

Fox pictured during the Tuesdau semifinal. She entered the competition as a strong favorite after posting a qualifying time of 98.46 seconds

Australian swimming prodigy Kaylee McKeown previously won her first-ever gold medal and flew home to win the women's 100m backstroke

Australian swimming prodigy Kaylee McKeown previously won her first-ever gold medal and flew home to win the women's 100m backstroke

Australian swimming prodigy Kaylee McKeown previously won her first-ever gold medal and flew home to win the women’s 100m backstroke

McKeown's gold is Australia's third to date at the Tokyo Olympics, after Ariarne Titmus and the relay team in the women's 4x100m freestyle

McKeown's gold is Australia's third to date at the Tokyo Olympics, after Ariarne Titmus and the relay team in the women's 4x100m freestyle

McKeown’s gold is Australia’s third to date at the Tokyo Olympics, after Ariarne Titmus and the relay team in the women’s 4x100m freestyle

By winning the 100m title, McKeown became Australia’s first backstroke gold medalist at an Olympics.

The nation had won individual events every other battle on the swim schedule, men and women.

But never backstroke in women, not in 97 years.

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