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Jerry Seinfeld beats those who say New York City is dead

Jerry Seinfeld has told the ‘wail and wail’ people that New York City is dead to get a grip as it will bounce back ‘sure as hell’ as the city continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic and escalating crime and homelessness.

In a scathing opinion in the New York Times On Monday, Seinfeld, who has lived in New York for 44 years, beat those who have fled the city since the pandemic broke in March.

The comedian’s comments were a direct response to a viral blog post written earlier this month by the comedy club owner and hedge fund entrepreneur in NYC James Altucher.

Altucher – who called Seinfeld a ‘putz’ – stated that the city was dead and would never recover, saying he had fled to Miami with his family after the week of looting and riots that ravaged NYC in June.

In response to Altucher’s claim that New York would never bounce back, Seinfeld insisted that this would happen because of “ tough New Yorkers ” who stayed behind to rebuild it.

Seinfeld, who has an estimated net worth of $ 950 million, lives in an apartment overlooking Central Park on the Upper West Side and also has a sprawling waterfront mansion in the Hamptons that he bought for $ 32 million from Billy Joel in 2000 .

Jerry Seinfeld told the `` wail and wail '' that New York City is dead to gain traction because it will bounce back `` sure as hell '' as the city continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic and escalating crime and homelessness

Jerry Seinfeld told the “ wail and wail ” that New York City is dead to gain traction because it will bounce back “ sure as hell ” as the city continues to grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic and escalating crime and homelessness

Many wealthy New Yorkers fled the city in favor of their Long Island homes when New York became the global epicenter of the COVID-19 outbreak five months ago.

Despite acknowledging that he does indeed have a place to retreat outside of the city, Seinfeld vowed to “ never leave New York City. ”

Choosing Altucher for moving to Miami, Seinfeld wrote, “Have you found a place in Florida? Fine. We know the sharp focus and restless, resilient creative spirit that Florida stands for. Do you think Rome is leaving too? London? Tokyo? The East Village?

Seinfeld's comments were a direct response to a viral blog post written earlier this month by NYC comedy club owner and hedge fund entrepreneur James Altucher. Altucher - who called Seinfeld a 'putz' - declared the city dead and would never recover

Seinfeld's comments were a direct response to a viral blog post written earlier this month by NYC comedy club owner and hedge fund entrepreneur James Altucher. Altucher - who called Seinfeld a 'putz' - declared the city dead and would never recover

Seinfeld’s comments were a direct response to a viral blog post written earlier this month by NYC comedy club owner and hedge fund entrepreneur James Altucher. Altucher – who called Seinfeld a ‘putz’ – declared the city dead and would never recover

‘They are not. They change. They mutate. They form again. Because greatness is rare. And the true greatness that is New York City is more than rare. It is unknown. Unknown anywhere outside of New York City.

“You say New York won’t bounce this time. You don’t bounce back. In your nervous, pastel-colored new Florida life. I hope you have a long healthy flight there. I can’t think of a better retaliation for your beautiful article.

“This stupid virus will eventually give up. In the same way as you. We’ll continue with New York City if that’s okay with you.

And it will come back for sure. Because of all the real, tough New Yorkers who, unlike you, loved it and understood it, stayed and rebuilt it. ‘

One of Altucher’s main arguments that NYC is not returning was that, unlike in earlier times of crisis – like 9/11 or the crime wave of the 1970s – there is currently nothing that is bringing people back because people work remotely.

However, Seinfeld argues that working remotely is not sustainable because there is no ‘energy’ in it and ‘everyone hates it’.

Guess what: everyone hates doing this. Everybody. Hates, ”Seinfeld wrote. ‘You know why? There is no energy.

Energy, attitude and personality cannot be kept ‘at bay’ by even the best fiber optic lines. That is why many of us moved to New York in the first place.

New York City - and Manhattan in particular - is currently grappling with escalating homelessness and crime amid the COVID-19 pandemic

New York City - and Manhattan in particular - is currently grappling with escalating homelessness and crime amid the COVID-19 pandemic

New York City – and Manhattan in particular – is currently grappling with escalating homelessness and crime amid the COVID-19 pandemic

In addition to the pandemic, New York City also grappled with a dark week of looting in June as some Black Lives Matter protests turned violent and the ongoing fight against escalating crime and homelessness

In addition to the pandemic, New York City also grappled with a dark week of looting in June as some Black Lives Matter protests turned violent and the ongoing fight against escalating crime and homelessness

In addition to the pandemic, New York City also grappled with a dark week of looting in June as some Black Lives Matter protests turned violent and the ongoing fight against escalating crime and homelessness

Have you ever wondered why Silicon Valley actually exists? I have always wondered: why do these people all live and work in that location? They have all this crazy technology; why don’t they all spread out where they want to be and connect to their devices? Because it doesn’t work, that’s why.

Real, living, inspiring human energy exists when we congeal together in crazy places like New York City.

He says he knows people who have moved from New York to Maine, Vermont, Tennessee, Indiana. I’ve been to all of these places for decades, many, many times. And with all respect and affection, Are. U. Just kidding. Me?!

Seinfeld said the last thing anyone needed at this point was the negativity that Altucher showed, given the “ challenges ” that everyone is now facing.

The last thing we need in the heat of so many challenges is a putz on LinkedIn that wails and wails, ‘Everyone’s gone! I want 2019 back! ‘,’ He wrote.

‘Shut up. Imagine you are in a real war with this man by your side. Listening to him, ‘I played chess all day. I could meet people. I could start any type of business. Wipe your tears, wipe your butt and pull. ‘

Numerous business executives have suggested in recent weeks that the damage to NYC’s economy could continue for years or decades as a result of the mass exodus of residents and businesses in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Just last week, a coalition of New York City restaurants threatened to sue Mayor Bill de Blasio after admitting there was ‘no plan’ and declining to provide a timeline for when indoor dining could return amid the COVID-19 pandemic. .

The New York City Hospitality Alliance on Thursday demanded that de Blasio and New York Governor Andrew Cuomo release a plan for when indoor dining could resume across the city.

In response to Altucher's claim that New York would never bounce back, Seinfeld insisted that this would happen because of `` tough New Yorkers '' who stayed behind to rebuild it. Above, an empty Times Square is depicted on August 16

In response to Altucher's claim that New York would never bounce back, Seinfeld insisted that this would happen because of `` tough New Yorkers '' who stayed behind to rebuild it. Above, an empty Times Square is depicted on August 16

In response to Altucher’s claim that New York would never bounce back, Seinfeld insisted that this would happen because of “ tough New Yorkers ” who stayed behind to rebuild it. Above, an empty Times Square is depicted on August 16

Numerous business executives have suggested in recent weeks that the damage to NYC's economy could last for years. Last week, a coalition of New York City restaurants threatened to sue Mayor Bill de Blasio after admitting there was 'no plan' and declining to provide a timeline for when indoor dining could return amid the COVID-19 pandemic

Numerous business executives have suggested in recent weeks that the damage to NYC's economy could last for years. Last week, a coalition of New York City restaurants threatened to sue Mayor Bill de Blasio after admitting there was 'no plan' and declining to provide a timeline for when indoor dining could return amid the COVID-19 pandemic

Numerous business executives have suggested in recent weeks that the damage to NYC’s economy could last for years. Last week, a coalition of New York City restaurants threatened to sue Mayor Bill de Blasio after admitting there was ‘no plan’ and declining to provide a timeline for when indoor dining could return amid the COVID-19 pandemic

Dining indoors was part of phase three of Cuomo’s reopening plan for the state.

New York City entered phase three in early July, but Cuomo and de Blasio have only allowed outdoor dining in NYC’s five boroughs so far. Every other county in New York State is currently allowed to dine indoors with limited capacity.

The Alliance has argued that it has been more than six weeks since in-house dining has been indefinitely postponed, but there is still no plan.

They say gyms, which were in phase four, and schools have already received reopening plans or guidelines.

New York currently has a positive test rate of 0.72 percent, which is among the lowest in the country. The state’s infection rate is less than 1 percent for 14 consecutive days.

In addition to the pandemic, New York City also grappled with a dark week of looting in June as some Black Lives Matter protests turned violent and the ongoing fight against escalating crime and homelessness.

Crime has skyrocketed in recent weeks, particularly shootings.

In July, there were 244 shootings across the city, compared to the 88 shooting incidents in July 2019 – an increase of 177 percent.

Police leaders in the Big Apple have placed the blame directly on Mayor Bill de Blasio, citing his attempt to scrap $ 1 billion from the NYPD’s budget as part of the issue.

President Donald Trump has taken this and vowed, without explaining how, to revive the city if he wins the election in November.

The spread of homelessness in Manhattan has been widespread in recent times with new derelict encampments sprouting up all over the city, along with hotels used to house 13,000 people previously in shelters that were closed to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks. appearance.

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