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Jeff Bezos’ futuristic vision of a self-sufficient habitat that could accommodate a BILLION of people in space

Last week, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos finally lifted the veil of the lunar lander who has been secretly developing his space company for years, along with a plan to get people back on the moon to stay.

And during the process, he also revealed an ambitious vision for space colonization.

Building on a concept introduced decades ago by physicist Gerard O’Neill – who studied Bezos himself during his time at Princeton, according to to Fast Company – the founder of Blue Origin outlined self-sufficient habitats that could hold entire cities, agricultural areas and even national parks in space.

While such a future may well be a long way off, Bezos says it will be an “easy choice” when faced with declining resources on Earth.

The habitats, reminiscent of the film Interstellar, could be built close enough to the earth to allow people to travel back and forth and accommodate “a million people or more each”. And according to Bezos, they would have the “ideal climate” at all times, like Maui on his best day, all year round. “

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“These are beautiful, people will want to live here,” said Bezos. “And they can be close to the earth so you can return. That is important because people want to return to Earth. They will not want to leave Earth forever. They also intervene

“We have to choose, do we want downtime and rationing, or do we want dynamism and growth?” Bezos asked during the invite-only event in Washington DC on May 9.

“This is an easy choice. We know what, we just want us to be busy.

“If we are in the solar system, we can have a trillion people in the solar system – meaning we have a thousand Mozarts and a thousand Einsteins. This would be an incredible civilization. “

The concept was first proposed in the 1970s by Bezos’ former professor O’Neill, whose proposed habitats would rotate in space to create artificial gravity based on centrifugal force.

“These are very large structures, miles behind each other, and they each contain a million people or more,” said Bezos.

The habitats, reminiscent of the film Interstellar, could be built close enough to the earth to allow people to travel back and forth and accommodate “a million people or more each”. And according to Bezos, they would have the “ideal climate” at all times, “like Maui on his best day, all year round”

These cities can replicate cities on Earth, such as those pictured above, or start all over again with their own futuristic architecture, Bezos noted. And there would be no rain, no storms, no earthquakes

These cities can replicate cities on Earth, such as those pictured above, or start all over again with their own futuristic architecture, Bezos noted. And there would be no rain, no storms, no earthquakes

These cities can replicate cities on Earth, such as those pictured above, or start all over again with their own futuristic architecture, Bezos noted. And there would be no rain, no storms, no earthquakes

The concept was first proposed in the 1970s by Bezos' former professor O'Neill, whose proposed habitats would rotate in space to create artificial gravity based on centrifugal force. Blue Origins' version of the design was shown during the secret event

The concept was first proposed in the 1970s by Bezos' former professor O'Neill, whose proposed habitats would rotate in space to create artificial gravity based on centrifugal force. Blue Origins' version of the design was shown during the secret event

The concept was first proposed in the 1970s by Bezos’ former professor O’Neill, whose proposed habitats would rotate in space to create artificial gravity based on centrifugal force. Blue Origins’ version of the design was shown during the secret event

“Some of them would be more recreational – they don’t all need the same gravity – they can have a zero-g recreational so you can fly with your own wings.”

They can replicate cities on Earth or start all over again with their own futuristic architecture, Bezos noted.

And there would be “no rain, no storms, no earthquakes.”

“These are beautiful, people will want to live here,” said Bezos.

“And they can be close to the earth so you can return. That is important because people want to return to Earth. They will not want to leave Earth forever. They can also go between them. “

According to Bezos, traveling between different space colonies would be as simple as ‘a day out’.

But we still have a long way to go before the vision can become reality.

“This will take a long time, this is a big vision,” said Bezos. “The entrance fee to do interesting things in the room right now is just too high.”

Founder of Blue Origin outlined self-sufficient habitats that could hold entire cities, agricultural areas and even national parks in space

Founder of Blue Origin outlined self-sufficient habitats that could hold entire cities, agricultural areas and even national parks in space

The concept was first conceived in the 1970s by Bezos' former professor O'Neill

The concept was first conceived in the 1970s by Bezos' former professor O'Neill

Building on a concept introduced decades ago by physicist Gerard O’Neill – who studied Bezos during his time at Princeton – the founder of Blue Origin (left) outlined self-sufficient habitats that could contain entire cities, agricultural areas, and even national areas in parks the space

According to Bezos, a journey between different space colonies would be as simple as “a day trip.” But we still have a long way to go before the vision can become reality. “This will take a long time, this is a big vision,” said Bezos. “The entrance fee to do interesting things in the room is simply too high”

While the event began with the extensive concept images of self-sufficient space habitats, the The real star of the conversation turned out to be something much closer to home – the moon.

On stage, Bezos pulled off the wraps of a huge model of what will be the company’s first lunar lander, called Blue Moon.

“This is an incredible vehicle, and it’s going to the moon,” said Bezos, according to CNN, who blogged the event live.

According to the CEO, the lander has been developing for the past three years and is on track for a moon landing with crew in 2024 – in line with the five-year deadline unveiled earlier this year by Vice President Mike Pence.

The plan could ultimately serve as a springboard for moon colonization and deeper space goals, Bezos said.

WHAT IS THE BLUE MOON LANDSCAPE?

Blue Origin unveiled its lunar lander during a secret event in May

Blue Origin unveiled its lunar lander during a secret event in May

Blue Origin unveiled its lunar lander during a secret event in May

Jeff Bezos has unveiled the new lunar lander of his space company, called Blue Moon.

The spacecraft is capable of carrying and delivering loads to the surface of the moon.

“This is an incredible vehicle and it’s going to the moon,” Bezos said.

Blue Origin has long cited a mission to the moon as one of the main priorities and has been working on vessel development for the past three years.

It uses many of the same ‘propulsion, precision guidance, vertical landing and landing gear systems’ used by New Shepard, the Blue Origin rocket intended to take people to the moon.

The vessel is equipped with fuel cells to deliver ‘kilowatts of power’ that can handle long missions.

As soon as Blue Moon arrives at its destination, it uses machine learning algorithms to land on the moon surface with precision.

Blue Moon can deliver several tons of payload to the moon, thanks to the upper deck and lower bays, the latter providing “closer access to the moon surface and discharging,” the company said.

With this technology, Blue Origin hopes that it will prepare us to send people back to the moon in 2024.

The spacecraft is capable of carrying and delivering loads to the surface of the moon. “This is an incredible vehicle and it’s going to the moon,” Bezos said

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