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Motorists are skeptical about the need for electric vehicles, although Australia's major parties swear to reduce CO2 emissions, a worldwide survey has been established (shown is a Tesla Model S)

The big hoax of electric cars & # 39; s: experts say car giants multi-billion dollar focus on green vehicles doesn't win for motorists

  • American customer satisfaction group JD Power has released a report on electric cars
  • Motorists gave electrical plug-ins a reliability of only 55 percent
  • Drivers are particularly concerned about reliability, range and loading times
  • Both political parties in Australia want to increase the popularity of electric cars
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Motorists are skeptical about the need for electric vehicles, although Australia's major parties promise to reduce CO2 emissions, according to a global study.

Battery-powered cars represent only 0.2 percent of vehicles on Australian roads.

The newest electric cars have a range of just a few hundred kilometers and require motorists to charge them for up to eight hours.

Next year, the government will release a national strategy for electric vehicles as part of an effort to reduce CO2 emissions by 28 percent by 2030.

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& # 39; Larger uptake of electric vehicles can mean cleaner air, better health, smarter cities, lower transportation costs and lower greenhouse gas emissions & # 39 ;, said the Ministry of Environment and Energy.

Motorists are skeptical about the need for electric vehicles, although Australia's major parties swear to reduce CO2 emissions, a worldwide survey has been established (shown is a Tesla Model S)

Motorists are skeptical about the need for electric vehicles, although Australia's major parties swear to reduce CO2 emissions, a worldwide survey has been established (shown is a Tesla Model S)

The Labor opposition continued in the May elections and promised that electric cars would make up half of the Australian fleet within 11 years.

Despite rhetoric from governments around the world, US consumer satisfaction company JD Power found that battery-electric cars had a reliability rating of 55 percent among consumers around the world.

& # 39; Out of the box, these scores are not encouraging & # 39 ;, said Kristin Kolodge, executive director of the group.

& # 39; Because car manufacturers are following the developmental path towards self-driving vehicles and greater electrification, it is important to know if consumers are on the same road – and going in the same direction.

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JD Power & # 39; s survey of 17 million consumers worldwide, known as Survey Monkey, showed that consumers had a neutral level of confidence in electric cars.

Almost half of the respondents were concerned about the reliability, the fact that it was unlikely that they would buy one and the price.

American consumer satisfaction company JD Power discovered that battery-electric cars had a reliability rating of 55 percent (shown is a Nissan Leaf)

American consumer satisfaction company JD Power discovered that battery-electric cars had a reliability rating of 55 percent (shown is a Nissan Leaf)

American consumer satisfaction company JD Power discovered that battery-electric cars had a reliability rating of 55 percent (shown is a Nissan Leaf)

In Australia, a Tesla Model S sedan costs more than $ 190,000 for a fully optional model.

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The Model X SUV from the Elon Musk company costs $ 146,000.

Electric cars from regular brands are also dear to Nissan Leaf prices starting at $ 50,000, which is double that of a top-selling Mazda3 on gas or Toyota Corolla.

JD Power said it would take another ten years for electric cars to match cars sold in gasoline and at least five before they reached a market share of 10 percent, or a level that is 50 times greater than today.

Motorists were particularly concerned about the range, where most models could only cover 300 km and the fact that they had to be charged for at least eight hours.

This was a major problem for three-quarters of respondents, with 74 percent of respondents just waiting 30 minutes to be charged.

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Australia also has no national charging station network.

& # 39; In addition, infrastructure and battery issues – costs, coverage and delivery capacity – are crucial challenges that need to be addressed, & # 39; said JD Power.

Despite the setbacks, 61 percent of respondents agreed that electric cars were better for the environment, while 48 percent saw cost benefits over gasoline.

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