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Japanese reality show Old Enough about children under five doing errands on their OWN

Netflix viewers have been moved to tears by a Japanese reality show that follows children as young as two as they try to complete everyday tasks without the help of their parents.

Old Enough was originally released in Japan in 1990 as Hajimete no Otsukai, which translates to ‘My First Errand’, but has only just been available to stream in the UK.

Among the 20 episodes is a child who buys items from the supermarket, as well as another who is tasked with making fruit juice, without any help from their parents, while being followed by the reality show camera crew.

The show has been airing in Japan for 30 years, and those concerned about safety can be reassured to know that it takes a tremendous amount of preparation to inspect the shopping routes before the tasks.

A hidden security team watches their movements and neighbors are informed in advance that the children will complete tasks in the area, after a lengthy selection process to make sure they can handle it.

Viewers have taken to Twitter to let them know how much they enjoyed the series, but critics have expressed concern about the ages of the children appearing throughout.

Netflix has made 20 episodes of the Japanese series Old Enough (pictured) available to stream in the UK

Netflix has made 20 episodes of the Japanese series Old Enough (pictured) available to stream in the UK

The series has been running in Japan for 30 years, with producers going through a rigorous process of choosing the kids to participate in the biannual reality show.

In episode one, two-year-old Hiroki travels about 1 mile each way to buy sweet curry, fish cakes and flowers for his mother.

Proudly he waves goodbye before braving the streets for 23 minutes. Hiroki runs through the store looking for the items before successfully completing the task.

In episode two, four-year-old Yuta is challenged to make tangerine juice while his family harvests from his grandfather’s field. His mother is forced to drag him along the ground as he tries to prevent him from helping to pick the fruits before going home alone to complete the task.

She becomes visibly emotional as she expresses her belief in Yuta, who has previously decorated their home with drawings on the wall.

After playing with toys and chasing a dog for an hour, Yuta gets a call from his mom asking “did you fill the bottle” and asking him to come back soon.

She is forced to call him a second time to finally let him make the juice, mixing the tangerine with a drop of lemon and syrup.

“Wow, you did it,” Yuta’s mother gushes when he returns.

The reality show follows children as young as two trying to complete everyday tasks, including grocery shopping

The reality show follows children as young as two trying to complete everyday tasks, including grocery shopping

Another episode shows Koiki, three, taking her father’s lunch to work in the harbor 1.2 km away from their home, a month after her older brother ran his first errands by buying souvenirs. deliver to all their neighbors.

Koiki’s mother reminds her of the code word she has with her father to avoid becoming a ‘cry baby’ before seeing her leave the house without shedding a tear.

You see them confidently crossing roads and avoiding conversations with strangers who greet her as she triumphantly makes it to deliver her father’s lunch.

Other episodes show toddlers navigating public transportation, helping their parents’ businesses, and running errands while light-hearted music plays in the background.

The Japanese series is filmed twice a year, with producers going through a rigorous process to choose the cast

The Japanese series is filmed twice a year, with producers going through a rigorous process to choose the cast

Some children not only go to shops, but also have to navigate public transport and do the shopping for their family

Some children not only go to shops, but also have to navigate public transport and do the shopping for their family

Many viewers have taken to Twitter to admit that they were moved by the series and would recommend it to others.

One person wrote: ‘Old enough on Netflix is ​​the best thing I’ve ever seen and I cried with every episode’

Another said: ‘Old Enough on Netflix is ​​so cute. Kids are as capable as you allow them to be and it’s so cute to watch these kids fulfill their duties because the adults around them believe in them.”

A third commented, “Old enough on Netflix is ​​one of the weirdest things I’ve come across and been recommended to me, but now I’m hooked. These kids are INCREDIBLE! I don’t understand how they do this.’

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1649763979 298 Japanese reality show Old Enough about children under five doing

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On Twitter, a stream of viewers admitted they were moved to tears by the reality series

On Twitter, a stream of viewers admitted they were moved to tears by the reality series

However, others are not impressed with the concept of the series.

“That show Old Enough on Netflix is ​​cute and all, but I feel like it’s a hell of a lot to condition TODDLERS to work,” one wrote.

Another said, “Okay, I’m officially over Netflix. I boycott them indefinitely, I will bootleg Ye’s next documentary. Cutie’s movie was bad enough, but this? A show in which toddlers are portrayed as mature and independent’

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1649763988 534 Japanese reality show Old Enough about children under five doing

1649763989 742 Japanese reality show Old Enough about children under five doing

Other commentators have been skeptical about how appropriate it is for children to behave like adults

Other commentators have been skeptical about how appropriate it is for children to behave like adults

A third added: ‘Why didn’t Netflix just keep the original ‘My First Errand’ translation? The show is so cute, but who wants the ‘Old Enough’ title in their queue?’

According to OKAY! There has been talk of a version of the show to be made in the UK, but child psychologist, Dr Alison McClymont, claims that a child can be traumatized by being ‘forced into survival mode’.

dr. Alison McClymont said: ‘This is exploitative and dangerous, I’ve never heard of anyone finding a toddler’s fear a reasonable basis for a TV show. I absolutely do not agree with this.’

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