Japanese fans ignore calls to watch Tokyo 2020 Games at home by lining streets to cheer on athletes

Japanese sports fans are defying government calls to watch the Tokyo 2020 Games at home by taking to the streets to cheer on the athletes and pose with Olympic symbols.

Hundreds of cycling enthusiasts came out to watch the men’s and women’s road race around the Japanese capital.

Dozens of others surrounded the iconic Olympic Torch booth on Tokyo’s waterfront all weekend, in defiance of government guidelines not to gather in groups because of the Games.

The torch – the ultimate Olympic symbol – was moved to the picturesque harbor from Japan’s National Stadium after the opening ceremony.

Guards had to be called in to prevent crowds from piling up around the stand and to urge benefactors to ‘keep moving’.

Sports fans don’t seem to be deterred, however, as residents of the Olympic city are finally getting behind the controversial Games.

Japanese sports fans are defying government calls to watch the Tokyo 2020 Games at home by taking to the streets to cheer on the athletes and pose with Olympic symbols. Pictured: Fans watch the men’s road race at Fuji International Speedway on Saturday

Hundreds of cycling enthusiasts came out to watch the men's and women's road race around the Japanese capital.  Pictured: Fans at the Women's Road Race as this Sunday leaves Musashinonomori Park in Tokyo

Hundreds of cycling enthusiasts came out to watch the men’s and women’s road race around the Japanese capital. Pictured: Fans at the Women’s Road Race as this Sunday leaves Musashinonomori Park in Tokyo

Fans created the competition's first crowd atmosphere by banging on barriers and cheering encouragingly.  Pictured: Fans at the men's road race in Oyama, Japan on Saturday

Fans created the competition’s first crowd atmosphere by banging on barriers and cheering encouragingly. Pictured: Fans at the men’s road race in Oyama, Japan on Saturday

In the picture: Fans line up to cheer on athletes and take photos during the Women's Road Race in Tokyo on Sunday

In the picture: Fans line up to cheer on athletes and take photos during the Women’s Road Race in Tokyo on Sunday

Pictured: Fans at the Women's Road Race as this Sunday leaves Musashinonomori Park in Tokyo

Pictured: Fans at the Women’s Road Race as this Sunday leaves Musashinonomori Park in Tokyo

Assistant professor Seki, told MailOnline: ‘Of course I came here to see the sacred flame.

“It’s a good place to take pictures for relatives.

“It’s normal for the authorities to voice their concerns, but I think if people follow the guidelines on the ground and take appropriate measures, it’s okay to come here.

“Personally, I think it would have been a much better idea to postpone the Olympics until next year, when people can enjoy them more freely, but the government had other ideas.”

Teacher Tsukano, 24, said: ‘I was in a nearby place today, so I came here to see.

‘The security measures they are taking seem to me to be sufficient.

“I wanted to see some competitions with athletes from my university, so I think the Olympics should be held.”

Dozens of people surrounded the iconic Olympic Torch booth on Tokyo's waterfront all weekend, defiant government guidelines not to gather in groups for the Games.  Pictured: People take pictures of the Olympic torch as a guard stands and insists on physical distancing dis

Dozens of people surrounded the iconic Olympic Torch booth on Tokyo’s waterfront all weekend, defiant government guidelines not to gather in groups for the Games. Pictured: People take pictures of the Olympic torch as a guard stands and insists on physical distancing dis

Assistant professor Seki (pictured) went to see the Olympic torch.  He said: 'It is normal for the authorities to express their concerns, but I think if people follow the guidelines on the ground and take appropriate measures, it is okay to come here'

Assistant professor Seki (pictured) went to see the Olympic torch. He said: ‘It is normal for the authorities to express their concerns, but I think if people follow the guidelines on the ground and take appropriate measures, it is okay to come here’

The torch – the ultimate Olympic symbol – was moved to the picturesque harbor from Japan's National Stadium after the opening ceremony.  Pictured: A family visit to the Olympic Torch

The torch – the ultimate Olympic symbol – was moved to the picturesque harbor from Japan’s National Stadium after the opening ceremony. Pictured: A family visit to the Olympic Torch

Guards had to be called in to prevent crowds from crowding around the stand and to encourage benefactors to 'keep moving'

Guards had to be called in to prevent crowds from crowding around the stand and to encourage benefactors to ‘keep moving’

'The security measures they are taking seem to me to be sufficient': Teacher Tsukano (pictured) said he was nearby, so went to the Olympic torch

‘The security measures they are taking seem to me to be sufficient’: Teacher Tsukano (pictured) said he was nearby, so went to the Olympic torch

Businesswoman Mori, 30, said: ‘I saw on the television news that this was the place with the strongest image of the Olympics, so I thought I’d come see it.

‘After all, we can’t go to the match locations.

‘I did some research and found that not too many people were coming, so I thought I’d be fine if I kept my distance.

“The Olympics are an event with such a long history, so I think it’s okay to hold them.”

Gas worker Noguchi, 50, added: ‘Of course, as the main symbol of the Olympics, I came here with my wife to see the sacred flame.

‘Politicians say the kind of things you expect from politicians, but as an individual citizen I wanted to come here.

“Although there is a pandemic, I agree that the Olympics should be held.”

Meanwhile, 10 more cases of coronavirus related to the Olympics, including two athletes, have been confirmed, bringing the total to 132 infections, the Tokyo Olympics Organizing Committee has announced.

A Dutch rower and a Czech cyclist are among the latest positive cases.

Ten more cases of coronavirus related to the Olympics have been confirmed, including two athletes, bringing the total to 132 infections, the Tokyo Olympics Organizing Committee has announced.

Ten more cases of coronavirus related to the Olympics have been confirmed, including two athletes, bringing the total to 132 infections, the Tokyo Olympics Organizing Committee has announced.

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