Japan reveals plan to use the facial recognition security system in the 2020 Olympic Games

A staff demonstrates a new facial recognition system used for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games during a press conference in Tokyo on Tuesday

A facial recognition system will be used in an Olympiad for the first time, as Tokyo organizers work to maintain tight and efficient security during the 2020 Games.

The NeoFace technology, developed by NEC Corp., will not be used by viewers.

Instead, it will be customized to monitor athletes, officials, staff and media in more than 40 locations, gaming towns and media centers.

The system was officially presented by officials of the Olympic company on Tuesday.

Scroll down to watch the video

A staff demonstrates a new facial recognition system used for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games during a press conference in Tokyo on Tuesday

A staff demonstrates a new facial recognition system used for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games during a press conference in Tokyo on Tuesday

Local organizers said Tokyo will be the first Olympic host to present facial recognition technology everywhere.

It is expected that the system effectively eliminates the entry with falsified identifications, reduces congestion in the accredited waiting lines and reduces the stress of athletes in hot weather.

It uses an artificial intelligence engine called NeoFace, which is a version of NEC's range of biometric authentication technologies.

Tsuyoshi Iwashita, executive director of security at Tokyo 2020, said that places that stretch in and out of the capital would be a big burden to achieve high levels of security.

Unlike other years, the events during the Tokyo games will spread throughout the city, instead of being contained in a single Olympic park.

"By introducing the facial recognition system, we expect to achieve high levels of safety, efficiency and trouble-free operation at security checkpoints before entry," said Iwashita, adding that the system would contribute to a less stressful environment for the athletes.

The NeoFace technology developed by NEC Corp. will be used at the Olympic Games for the first time, as Tokyo organizers work to keep security tight and efficient in dozens of places

The NeoFace technology developed by NEC Corp. will be used at the Olympic Games for the first time, as Tokyo organizers work to keep security tight and efficient in dozens of places

The NeoFace technology developed by NEC Corp. will be used at the Olympic Games for the first time, as Tokyo organizers work to keep security tight and efficient in dozens of places

It is expected that the system will effectively eliminate the entry with falsified identifiers, reduce congestion in the accredited waiting lines and reduce the stress of the athletes when it is hot.

It is expected that the system will effectively eliminate the entry with falsified identifiers, reduce congestion in the accredited waiting lines and reduce the stress of the athletes when it is hot.

It is expected that the system will effectively eliminate the entry with falsified identifiers, reduce congestion in the accredited waiting lines and reduce the stress of the athletes when it is hot.

NEC used a former six-foot-eight Olympic volleyball player to show that the technology works for people of all abilities, Verge said.

Masaaki Suanuma, vice president of NEC, pointed out that the technology was accurate 99.7 percent of the time. He added that "the number will not change" if the users have different nationalities or are of different heights.

The Games begin on July 24, 2020, so temperatures are expected to be high, which emphasizes the need for efficiency so that athletes and staff do not have to wait in uncomfortable conditions.

Iwashita said a test last year showed that door controls using facial recognition were more than twice the pace of the conventional system that uses X-rays with the visual location of security guards.

Guests and staff demonstrate a new facial recognition system used for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games during a press conference in Tokyo

Guests and staff demonstrate a new facial recognition system used for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games during a press conference in Tokyo

Guests and staff demonstrate a new facial recognition system used for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games during a press conference in Tokyo

The facial images of each person accredited for the Olympic and Paralympic Games will be collected after the approval process and stored in a database that will be used to verify the identities in the accreditation verification points.

NEC says its biometric identification technology is used at airports and elsewhere in 70 countries, including Japan.

The company also tested the system during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games.

HOW DOES THE FACIAL RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY WORK?

Facial recognition software works by combining images in real time with a previous photograph of a person.

Each face has approximately 80 unique nodal points through the eyes, nose, cheek and mouth that distinguish one person from another.

A digital video camera measures the distance between various points on the human face, such as the width of the nose, the depth of the eye sockets, the distance between the eyes and the shape of the jaw line.

An intelligent surveillance system (in the image) that can scan 2 billion faces in seconds has been revealed in China. The system connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to choose targets

This produces a unique numeric code that can then be linked to a matching code collected from a previous photograph.

A facial recognition system used by officials in China connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to choose the targets.

Experts believe that facial recognition technology will soon surpass fingerprint technology as the most effective way to identify people.

(function() {
var _fbq = window._fbq || (window._fbq = []);
if (!_fbq.loaded) {
var fbds = document.createElement(‘script’);
fbds.async = true;
fbds.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbds.js”;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(fbds, s);
_fbq.loaded = true;
}
_fbq.push([‘addPixelId’, ‘1401367413466420’]);
})();
window._fbq = window._fbq || [];
window._fbq.push([“track”, “PixelInitialized”, {}]);
.