JANET STREET-PORTER about Simon Cowell's son Eric

Simon Cowell and Lauren Silverman with their son Eric in August 2018 in Los Angeles

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Simon Cowell and Lauren Silverman with their son Eric in August 2018 in Los Angeles

Poor little Eric Cowell – only five years old and his (well-meaning but intrusive) father has already drawn up an action plan. A roadmap to personal success without alternatives.

Pop Svengali and workaholic Simon Cowell is not satisfied with mind-boggling protegees on his talent shows and record labels, he is determined to turn his son into a clone, work in dad's company before he reaches his teens!

Cowell says he can't see the usefulness of secondary education – it didn't work for him, he hates exams, forged his reports, and left as quickly as he could.

In the & # 39; informed & # 39; Simon's opinion that education after a certain age is meaningless (unless your child is an academic genius), and he does not want Eric to be bullying and stressed out by homework. Simon believes in apprenticeships as a way to learn about work and says that homework makes no sense.

Sweet Eric did not offer us his opinion (at least not in public), but – more importantly – will this child even have something to say? In Simon & # 39; s world, what Simon says is what happens without any disagreements. Cowell is surrounded by yes men and women and a loyal harem of ex-girlfriends. He is a man of habit, wearing the same clothes (T-shirts and pants from Armani), who takes the same holidays in Barbados and St Tropez every year, drinks the same beer (Sapporo) and eats the same food – although he says that he is trying to become a vegan.

Simon Cowell, 58, and his son Eric, now five, at The X Factor auditions in London in July 2017
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Simon Cowell, 58, and his son Eric, now five, at The X Factor auditions in London in July 2017

Simon Cowell, 58, and his son Eric, now five, at The X Factor auditions in London in July 2017

That regime is fine for a 58-year-old who has more money than he could ever spend, who enjoys stress and long working hours, but should collect money and power as a measure of success?

Is Eric old enough to understand all the options that would be available if he were allowed to study science, languages ​​or technology instead of registering contracts, sales and viewing figures? Before he even got into long pants, Eric had his choices pruned into just one – show business. He can forget a fireman, a neurosurgeon or a chef – those laudable options are not on the father's agenda. Cruel, selfish father has decided that Eric is expected to follow in his (built up) shoes.

Fortunately for Eric, child labor has been declared illegal in the UK and parents are legally required to have their children educated.

And what lifestyle does Simon Cowell's success entail?

Strange to say the least – he gets up at noon, does 500 press-ups a day and then works until very late at night.

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You might not appreciate his taste in clothing, but it is impossible to deny that Cowell has an enormous talent for spotting potential and cherishing the stars of tomorrow. Granted, if people don't meet his high standards, he dumps them, but that's the harsh reality of the record industry.

Eric at 11 weeks old

Eric at 11 weeks old

Simon Cowell posted a 11-week-old photo of Eric with Miss Silverman in May 2014

Simon Cowell posted a 11-week-old photo of Eric with Miss Silverman in May 2014

Simon Cowell posted these 11 & # 39; s pictures of Eric from 11 weeks with Miss Silverman in May 2014

Co-producing and reviewing the X-factor and Britain's Got Talent and their American counterparts takes weeks and weeks of its time spent in the dark boundaries of a TV studio that listens to acts that can range from the stunningly nasty heartbeat. – brilliant.

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But should he control the development of his own son? After all, Eric is a child, not a wannabe singer or a juggling act.

Simon Cowell is not the first pushy parent who thinks they know what is best for their children. In fact, he is typical of many modern mothers and fathers who think that only they (and not teachers) understand what their offspring needs.

Simon is already taking Eric to the TV studio & # 39; s – is that the right environment for a five year old child? Children record experiences at that age. Eric should play with friends from all sorts of backgrounds, go to museums, explore the countryside, not hang out in changing rooms.

He should spend time away from telephones, and any form of screen, game sharing, and how to handle toys are denied and told.

Some people even think that a few lessons in all of the above would look out of place for Simon.

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When Eric was only a few months old, Simon said: & I don't think he likes me very much, clearly not realizing that he was talking about a small child.

Simon added & # 39; he knows how to try & # 39; as if he was talking about a nasty pop star who wouldn't rehearse. These funny remarks are, of course, intended to give the Simon Cowell myth a boost, to get a constant bubble of media attention in whatever SyCo does.

And this week America & # 39; s Got Talent is launching series 14, while the thirteenth series Britain & # 39; s Got Talent is approaching the grand finale. Could Simon use his own child's school to spur publicity? The thought perishes.

With his father's millions, Eric never has to do a job interview, write a resume, get the right grades for a decent college or university. He will just dive into a job if he sticks to the master plan.

But, even worse, Simon & # 39; s thoughtless waste of education does not offer any form of leadership to the millions of young people who watch his shows and cannot rely on Dad's millions.

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And who sees reality TV as a more realistic way of wealth than following a course or focusing on a good career.

The vast majority of those who will never come to the end of one of Simon's TV trips still deserve to get a good job and use their potential.

They must be encouraged to respect teachers, to stay in school as long as possible and to do their best. Just because you don't like something doesn't mean it's bad for you.

I hated school, but I am happy that I passed the exams and went to college. School (and fighting bullies) teaches you resilience, listening to different points of view.

Perhaps there is too much homework (Simon is very impressed with the academic achievements of the children in Finland, where homework has been abolished), but why does he not divert his energy into attempts to change British secondary education? We have to do something good, since our top universities are considered the best in the world.

Simon, please let Eric have the best start in life by supporting him, not interfere. Please grow.

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