James Wilby was disappointed he couldn’t medal in the 200m breaststroke final for the NHS nurse’s mother

Tearful James Wilby admits disappointed he couldn’t medal in 200m breaststroke final for his NHS nurse mother… as Team GB swimmer calls her his ‘role model’ for administering Covid vaccines in York

James Wilby paid tribute to his NHS nurse mother after finishing sixth in the 200m breaststroke final.

The mother of 27-year-old Fiona administers Covid vaccines in the family’s home city of York.

And Wilby burst into tears as she described her heroic work for the NHS and her assistance in reaching an Olympic final.

James Wilby paid tribute to his NHS nurse mother after finishing sixth in the 200m breaststroke final

27-year-old Fiona's mother administers Covid vaccines in family city of York

27-year-old Fiona’s mother administers Covid vaccines in family city of York

“My mother has done such a service for me for the past 27 years,” said the Team GB swimmer. “That’s probably been the biggest disappointment, knowing I’ve made her proud, but I haven’t won the medal I’d like to win for her.

“She works as a nurse and has been handing out vaccines lately, to an extent that I’m so damn proud of her, and of what she’s done for me and my brother over the years.

“I’m really happy with what she’s done. She is the role model in all of this. I hope she enjoyed watching that.’

Wilby, who finished fifth in the 100m breaststroke final, won by his teammate Adam Peaty, was halfway up the bronze medal.

Wilby burst into tears as she described her heroic work for the NHS and her help

Wilby burst into tears as she described her heroic work for the NHS and her help

But he sank in the final 100 meters to finish in a time of 2 minutes 08.19 seconds, which was 1.81 seconds behind Australian Zac Stubblety-Cook, who won the gold with an Olympic record of 2:06 ,38.

“I’m really disappointed I couldn’t be with them and challenge for those medals,” added Wilby, who won world silver in the 100m in 2019. “But if that’s my last dive here at the Games, I’ve got a duty to support others.

“I’m a big believer in it being a team sport and that means my attitude and mannerisms influence other people – staff and swimmers. We are half way through, but not yet at the end. There is more work to do.

“There are people I’m very close to and who have great opportunities. I don’t want to be the 0.01 percent that sucks them dry.

“I’m sorry to leave the Olympics individually with nothing to show for it, as they might say, but there are still more medals to be won in the team.”

Australian Zac Stubblety-Cook won the gold medal with an Olympic record of 2:06.38

Australian Zac Stubblety-Cook won the gold medal with an Olympic record of 2:06.38

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