James Walsh went to Mexico for cancer treatments

James Walsh (pictured) was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma in 2009 after his doctor discovered an inflamed lymph node in his groin.

A former NRL star returned to Mexico after her cancer began to spread.

Former St George Illawarra Dragons and Cronulla Sharks player James Walsh was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma in 2009 after his doctor discovered an inflamed lymph node in his groin.

They told him he only had a 50 percent chance of survival.

Mr. Walsh underwent surgery as soon as possible and was in remission.

However, in 2012 he was diagnosed again.

Earlier this year, scans showed that Mr. Walsh's cancer had appeared in places it was not before.

And then her children, Kate and Nathan, started a crowdfunding page for her father to investigate alternative treatments.

On the page, Mr. Walsh's children wrote: "It has been an incredible journey of ups and downs over the past nine years and, through him, every dad has remained committed to his health and has been an inspiration to me. , Nathan and many others in his life.

"Anyone who knows James will know that he is an extremely passionate, loving and caring man, will do anything to help others and has much more to contribute to those around him."

In the end, Mr. Walsh went to a treatment center in Mexico, where he went six times a week.

James Walsh (pictured) was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma in 2009 after his doctor discovered an inflamed lymph node in his groin.

James Walsh (pictured) was diagnosed with stage 3 melanoma in 2009 after his doctor discovered an inflamed lymph node in his groin.

The clinic does not use medical immunotherapies such as keytruda and opdivo.

These immunotherapies only have a success rate of 34 percent and can have severe side effects, something that Mr. Walsh wanted to avoid.

Mr. Walsh uploaded a series of videos to YouTube while he was at the St Andrews Clinic in Tijuana.

Walsh said his treatment was "double", a combination of immunotherapy and that it helps your immune system with what goes on inside your body.

Mr. Walsh went to a treatment center in Mexico, where he went six times a week. He was at St Andrews for five weeks in total and said in his latest update that there were "significant changes in his body."

Mr. Walsh went to a treatment center in Mexico, where he went six times a week. He was at St Andrews for five weeks in total and said in his latest update that there were "significant changes in his body."

Mr. Walsh went to a treatment center in Mexico, where he went six times a week. He was at St Andrews for five weeks in total and said in his latest update that there were "significant changes in his body."

He described his progress as "stable".

"And when I say regular I mean a decrease in pain and I have had an improvement in the position of the body, for example, simple things like lying on your side and back, only general mobility.

& # 39; I just want to make it clear that I am very grateful to all the people who have helped me get here. I think that as someone who wants to do something like this, I think he should have a little momentum.

"But that impulse can only be realized through the generosity of the people, not only financially by emotional generosity and undivided support.

"It's so good to receive this treatment and it's so wonderful to feel better."

He said that one day he woke up painlessly and felt "normal".

Although the services of St Andrews (pictured) are offered throughout Mexico, the Australian Department of Health will not recognize the validity.

Although the services of St Andrews (pictured) are offered throughout Mexico, the Australian Department of Health will not recognize the validity.

Although the services of St Andrews (pictured) are offered throughout Mexico, the Australian Department of Health will not recognize the validity.

Mr. Walsh was at St Andrews for five weeks in total and said in his latest update that there were "significant changes in his body".

His cancer decreased by 60 percent.

Although St Andrews services, which include low doses of chemotherapy and insulin-enhanced therapies, are offered throughout Mexico, the Australian Department of Health will not recognize the validity.

The medical director of Australia, Professor Brendan Murphy, told 9news.com.au: "This is not offered in Australia because it is not a proven effective treatment for cancer."

Mr. Walsh returned to Sydney this week. He has some treatments to continue and will be able to control how things are going. He wants to return to St Andrews later this year

Mr. Walsh returned to Sydney this week. He has some treatments to continue and will be able to control how things are going. He wants to return to St Andrews later this year

Mr. Walsh returned to Sydney this week. He has some treatments to continue and will be able to control how things are going. He wants to return to St Andrews later this year

Mr. Walsh's stay cost him $ 45,000, and he wants to return.

& # 39; Things are not cheap

"I think in Australia we're a bit spoiled because everything, a lot, we got it for free and we do not even question it."

"Unfortunately, when you get to an independent environment, you have to pay for what you get.

"I think it was worth every penny."

Mr. Walsh returned to Sydney this week. He has some treatments to continue and will be able to control how things are going.

He needs to return in four to six weeks for his treatment to be effective, Walsh told the publication.

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