Advertisements
Jacqui Lambie (photo) has had a fiery debate with Waleed Aly on The Project

& # 39; For God's sake! & # 39; Jacqui Lambie clashes with Waleed Aly on The Project during a fiery exchange about the Centrelink test plan for medicines

  • Jacqui Lambie and Waleed Aly have argued about drug testing well-being tests
  • Mrs. Lambie said that all people who are paid from & # 39; the public wallet & # 39; must be tested
  • Aly doubted her idea to test millions of people in public service
  • & # 39; Why are we so special that we should not undergo random drug and alcohol tests? & # 39;
  • Lambie believed that the proposal can only work with adequate rehabilitation facilities
Advertisements

Jacqui Lambie and Waleed Aly have come together The project about the changing attitude of the senator towards plans to test welfare applications.

Advertisements

The power balance senator announced on Monday that she will not vote for the coalition government's plan until she sees thousands of drug rehabilitation beds all over Australia looking back on her first support for the bill.

On Monday night's program, Ms. Lambie stated that everyone who & # 39; out of the public purse & # 39; paid had to be tested on drugs, including MPs, teachers and journalists.

& # 39; They should already do it and set a good example & # 39 ;, she told the panel.

Scroll down for video

Jacqui Lambie (photo) has had a fiery debate with Waleed Aly on The Project

Advertisements

Jacqui Lambie (photo) has had a fiery debate with Waleed Aly on The Project

& # 39; We do it in mining, we do it in construction, there are many other places in Australia that do it, why are we so special because we were at the show that we should not have random drug and alcohol tests undergone? & # 39;

Aly asked Mrs. Lambie for clarity.

& # 39; If I am right, what you are saying, have you been presented with a proposal on testing people for drugs for well-being, and your counter-proposal is – let's test everyone in public service, that's millions of people? & # 39 ; & # 39; he asked.

& # 39; It's random, & # 39; said Lambie. & # 39; It's random drug and alcohol testing, Waleed, and they don't test everyone.

Advertisements

& # 39; I don't care where you work. There is no reason why you should not undergo random drug and alcohol tests. We have huge drug problems in this country, for God's sake!

& # 39; If I am right, what you are saying is that you have received a proposal about testing people's well-being for drugs, and your counter-proposal is - let's test everyone in the public service, & # 39; Aly asked

& # 39; If I am right, what you are saying is that you have received a proposal about testing people's well-being for drugs, and your counter-proposal is - let's test everyone in the public service, & # 39; Aly asked

& # 39; If I am right, what you are saying is that you have received a proposal about testing people's well-being for drugs, and your counter-proposal is – let's test everyone in the public service, & # 39; Aly asked

& # 39; But why discriminate, why are it only the poor? Why do we only have to go after the poor? Are we too good, don't we do alcohol and drugs or something? That is nonsense, drugs do not discriminate, ice certainly not. & # 39;

Drug problems are a problem near Mrs. Lambie, who once appeared in The Project with her son Dylan, who spent a year in rehabilitation to recover from ice addiction.

Advertisements

Mrs Lambie believes that the drug and alcohol testing reform can only be effective if the addicts are helped.

& # 39; It's a good idea if it means we have help we can give, but if that help isn't there, it's not a good idea, & # 39; she said.

Her comments came when it turned out that any welfare recipient who tested positive for the drug plan would be eligible for $ 65,000 rehabilitation – funded by taxpayers, The Daily Telegraph reported.

The government hopes that a promise will be sufficient to secure the support of Mrs Lambie.

Advertisements

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news