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Jacinta Price accuses Albanese of bullying, gaslighting over Indigenous Voice to Parliament

Jacinta Price has warned Australia ‘should be aware’ that Anthony Albanese’s government is starting to ramp up ‘bullying, gaslighting and emotional blackmail’ ahead of the proposed referendum on the Indigenous vote in parliament.

Senator Indigenous Nationals’ anger was sparked by comments from Secretary of State Linda Burney, who stated that the government would not fund either side of the yes/no argument.

This is despite the fact that the federal budget has already earmarked a whopping $235 million for the referendum that could be held as early as next year with $75 million to spend before Australians vote.

Senator Price was one of the strongest critics of the proposal, as she believes the push to recognize First Nations people in the constitution and possibly create a third chamber of parliament to advise the government will lead to further division , without tackling the backlog.

She blamed Labor for it saturating the public service, education systems and government-funded NGOs with ‘propaganda’ of the yes campaign.

Native Senator Jacinta Price (Pictured In Thursday'S Senator)

Native Senator Jacinta Price (pictured in Thursday’s Senator)

Northern Territory-based senator fears government will pushbullying, gaslighting and emotional blackmail’ in a desperate attempt to win over the Indigenous vote in parliament.

When the tactful PM refers to the Australian public responsible for funding the yes and no campaigns, what he really means is that big companies that Labor has courted in recent years will heavily fund the yes campaign on behalf of Labour. ‘ said Senator. Price told NewsCorp.

It is quite clear that Labor is not interested in fully and equally informing the Australian public about the no argument, only the yes argument.

“They will ramp up their bullying, gaslighting, and emotional blackmail tactics—everyone knows.”

According to figures in the budget handed over in October, there is already $160 million in a ‘contingency reserve’ to fund Australia’s first referendum since 1999.

A further $75.1 million has been earmarked for ‘preparation and support work’, (increasing) First Nations enrollment and participation’, along with ‘$6.5 million for the National Indigenous Australians Agency in support of the referendum ‘.

Minister Linda Burney (Pictured With Anthony Albanese) Stated That The Government Would Not Fund Either Side Of The Yes/No Argument For The Proposed Indigenous Vote To Parliament, Despite $235 Million Already Being Allocated In The Budget.

Minister Linda Burney (Pictured With Anthony Albanese) Stated That The Government Would Not Fund Either Side Of The Yes/No Argument For The Proposed Indigenous Vote To Parliament, Despite $235 Million Already Being Allocated In The Budget.

Minister Linda Burney (pictured with Anthony Albanese) stated that the government would not fund either side of the yes/no argument for the proposed Indigenous vote to parliament, despite $235 million already being allocated in the budget.

The Voice: What would be added to the constitution?

1. There will be a body called the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice.

2. The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice may lodge protests with Parliament and the Executive Government on matters pertaining to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.

3. Parliament shall, subject to this Constitution, have the power to make laws relating to the composition, functions, powers and procedures of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice.

Indigenous minister Linda Burney insists no government funding will be given to run official ‘yes’ and ‘no’ campaigns for the referendum

Corporate and private donations are expected for both sides of the argument.

“We will use public funds to fund a civic campaign so people know what referendums are,” Ms Burney told ABC last week.

“We are not going to use public money to fund a yes or no campaign. We believe that those campaigns can raise their own money, with private funds.’

By comparison, the former John Howard administration contributed $7.5 million each to the “yes” and “no” cases of the 1999 republic referendum.

Neither party was allowed to raise money or accept outside donations.

Further details on what an Indigenous vote in parliament would look like and how it would affect communities will be released ahead of the referendum.

Ms Burney said Australians will be ‘well informed’ about what they are voting for when they go to the polls.

“They’ll understand the rationale for the vote to improve the life outcomes of First Nations people, but also questions about how it will work,” she said.

“And, more importantly, what it will mean to unite this country.”

The debate erupted after the Prime Minister made a proposal referendum on recognizing the people of First Nation in the Constitution and requiring consultation with them on decisions affecting their lives.

Senator Jacinta Price (Flanked By National Colleagues Outside Parliament Last Week) Claims Labor Will Step Up Its 'Bullying, Gaslighting And Emotional Blackmail' For Introducing The Indigenous Vote To Parliament

Senator Jacinta Price (Flanked By National Colleagues Outside Parliament Last Week) Claims Labor Will Step Up Its 'Bullying, Gaslighting And Emotional Blackmail' For Introducing The Indigenous Vote To Parliament

Senator Jacinta Price (flanked by national colleagues outside parliament last week) claims Labor will step up its ‘bullying, gaslighting and emotional blackmail’ for introducing the Indigenous vote to parliament

The proposed referendum has raised more questions than answers since it was revealed in a groundbreaking announcement in August.

At the recent GQ Man of the Year Awards in Sydney, Mr Albanese delivered a rousing speech, calling on the nation to perform the Voice to Parliament.

‘So in the next year, 2023, you will have a say. You have the same voice as me. Make it count,” he addressed the crowd.

“Make sure you’re doing something you’re proud of and that makes a difference to this country. It’s a huge risk and one that First Nations elders are willing to take because they’re tired of waiting for recognition.

“And a vote to parliament is simply that: it is so that they are consulted on matters that concern them, but it also means that our country’s birth certificate is really as it should be.”

The Prime Minister Hopes Australians Will Vote In The 2023 Indigenous Vote In Parliament Referendum

The Prime Minister Hopes Australians Will Vote In The 2023 Indigenous Vote In Parliament Referendum

The prime minister hopes Australians will vote in the 2023 Indigenous vote in parliament referendum

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Jacky

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