Advertisements
Prince Harry spent three weeks in Liwonde National Park in Malawi working on a conservation project to bring 500 elephants back to the sanctuary

Revealed: & # 39; Ivory trafficker & # 39; arrested about endangered black rhino genus in Malawi nature reserve. Prince Harry will visit Monday after dramatic police dive of horns, hippos and crocodile skins has been found

  • Yunhua Lin, 46, was arrested in Malawi after fleeing for three months
  • The crime boss was detained after a police bust found a stock of 103 black rhino horns
  • They come from endangered rhinos that are slaughtered in the Liwonde National Park
  • Prince Harry spent three weeks in the park in 2016 to help elephants at risk
  • He will go back there Monday as part of his 10-day tour through South Africa
Advertisements

A man accused of trafficking in ivory is confronted with a prison over rhino slaughtering in a Malawi nature reserve where Prince Harry will visit on Monday.

Yunhua Lin was arrested after a dramatic police attack seized a catch of rhino horns, hippopotamus teeth and crocodile skin.

The horns are from the endangered black rhinos slaughtered in the Liwonde National Park, where the Duke of Sussex worked on one of & # 39; the world's largest conservation projects.

Harry spent three weeks in the 212-square-mile park, in the south of the country, as part of a project to re-introduce 500 elephants in 2016.

Advertisements

He will visit Liwonde again Monday as part of a 10-day royal tour of Africa, his first overseas engagement with Meghan and their five-month-old son Archie.

Prince Harry spent three weeks in Liwonde National Park in Malawi working on a conservation project to bring 500 elephants back to the sanctuary

Prince Harry spent three weeks in Liwonde National Park in Malawi working on a conservation project to bring 500 elephants back to the sanctuary

The Duke of Sussex, pictured on a rhino mission in Malawi, will visit the park again on Monday as a park of his 10-day tour of South Africa with his wife Meghan and their son, Archie

The Duke of Sussex, pictured on a rhino mission in Malawi, will visit the park again on Monday as a park of his 10-day tour of South Africa with his wife Meghan and their son, Archie

The Duke of Sussex, pictured on a rhino mission in Malawi, will visit the park again on Monday as a park of his 10-day tour of South Africa with his wife Meghan and their son, Archie

Michelle Harper from the African Conservation Foundation told MailOnline: “Harry will be shocked to hear that rhinos from the park where he spent three happy weeks have been slaughtered in front of their horns.

& # 39; The duke worked closely with the authorities in the park three years ago when he helped move 500 elephants and therefore has great affinity with all animals in the park.

While Prince Harry visits the park, Yunhua Lin (right) was arrested after a dramatic police dive caught a catch of rhino horns, hippo teeth and crocodile skin
Advertisements

While Prince Harry visits the park, Yunhua Lin (right) was arrested after a dramatic police dive caught a catch of rhino horns, hippo teeth and crocodile skin

While Prince Harry visits the park, Yunhua Lin (right) was arrested after a dramatic police dive caught a catch of rhino horns, hippo teeth and crocodile skin

& # 39; However, he will be pleased that the Malawi authorities seem to be winning the battle, not only against poachers, but also against smugglers who are ultimately responsible for the demand for ivory and killing on the ground. & # 39; ;

Crime boss Lin, 46, described by the Malawi government as a & # 39; infamous ivory kingpin & # 39 ;, was the target of coordinated police raids on six homes in May.

He initially escaped and fled for three months before finally being traced in Liwonde and arrested in August.

Advertisements

Lin, known as Lee & # 39; Fingers & # 39; because he is missing three figures on his left, he is currently in prison in pre-trial detention and is expected to appear in court on 8 October.

He is accused of illegal possession of protected species and acts in government trophies in violation of the National Parks and Wildlife Act.

His gang is also confronted with allegations of illegal possession of firearms and explosives.

Among those arrested during police raids in May were Lin & # 39; s wife Qin Hua Zhang, 42, and son-in-law Li Hao Yaun, 28.

Michelle Harper from the African Conservation Foundation said that Harry, pictured on the 2016 project, & # 39; shocked & # 39; will be to hear that rhinos from the park have been killed for their horns

Michelle Harper from the African Conservation Foundation said that Harry, pictured on the 2016 project, & # 39; shocked & # 39; will be to hear that rhinos from the park have been killed for their horns

Advertisements

Michelle Harper from the African Conservation Foundation said that Harry, pictured on the 2016 project, & # 39; shocked & # 39; will be to hear that rhinos from the park have been killed for their horns

Harry joked and a few others & # 39; tried to tip an elephant & # 39; while working in Malawi to move 500 of the beautiful animals over 350 km across Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve

Harry joked and a few others & # 39; tried to tip an elephant & # 39; while working in Malawi to move 500 of the beautiful animals over 350 km across Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve

Harry joked and a few others & # 39; tried to tip an elephant & # 39; while working in Malawi to move 500 of the beautiful animals over 350 km across Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve

At the time, both were on bail for individual human trafficking offenses that they were eventually convicted of this week.

Zhang and Yaun were arrested with two Malawians in December 2017 on a farm in the Malawi capital Lilongwe.

Advertisements

They were found with ten pieces of ivory – weighing 21 kilograms – in addition to illegal drugs and crocodile skins.

The gang was convicted Tuesday for illegal possession of and trade in a protected species at the magistrate court in Lilongwe. They can be imprisoned for 30 years.

Mary Rice, executive director of the Environment Investigations Agency, said: & I am delighted to see the Malawi government make such progress in its fight against organized natural crime.

& # 39; Malawi has recently been identified as South Africa's most important transit and distribution hub for human traffickers in nature, and successes such as these attract positive interest and praise from the international community.

& # 39; We will follow with great interest the progress of these matters. & # 39;

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) prince-harry