Ivanka Trump got into a shouting match with Steve Bannon because he stepped over the chain of command & # 039;

According to reports, Ivanka Trump was offended when strategist Steve Bannon told her that it was simply a

According to reports, Ivanka Trump was offended when strategist Steve Bannon told her that she was simply an "employee" of the White House when she responded: "I am not an employee, I will never be a staff member, I am the first daughter, & # 39; has been claimed.

The famous reporter Bob Woodward includes the explosive anecdote in his new book, Fear: Trump in the White House.

Excerpts from the book were reported on Tuesday by The Washington Post.

In the book, Woodward writes about an "altercation charged with expletives" between the then counselor Bannon and the eldest daughter of President Donald Trump.

In the exchange, a Furious Bannon attacked Ivanka Trump.

"You're a damn staff member!" According to reports, Bannon shouted at him.

You walk through this place and you act like you're in charge, and you're not. You are on the staff!

According to reports, Ivanka Trump was offended when strategist Steve Bannon told her that she was simply an "employee" of the White House when she responded: "I am not an employee, I will never be a staff member, I am the first daughter, & # 39, has been claimed, she is seen outside of her home in Washington, DC last month

& # 39; I'm not an employee! I will never be a staff member. I am the first daughter, it is reported that Ivanka told Bannon.

It was said that Bannon was upset with Ivanka's tendency to bypass the standard chain of command and address the problems directly with his father.

All the other assistants of the White House had to appear before the chief of staff at that time, Reince Priebus.

But the reported exchange apparently highlighted the fact that Ivanka felt she was not subject to the same rules.

Ivanka Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner, are senior advisors to the president even though they have no previous experience in government.

The reported confrontation between Ivanka and Bannon is one of the many shocking details about the internal workings of Trump's White House as said by Woodward.

According to the author, Trump wanted Syrian President Bashar al-Assad to be assassinated last year, but his defense secretary ignored the request.

It was said that Bannon was upset with Ivanka's tendency to bypass the standard chain of command and address the problems directly with his father.

It was said that Bannon was upset with Ivanka's tendency to bypass the standard chain of command and address the problems directly with his father.

It was said that Bannon was upset with Ivanka's tendency to bypass the standard chain of command and address the problems directly with his father.

Woodward often represents Trump's best advisors as they sometimes ignore presidential orders to limit what they consider to be harmful and dangerous behavior.

"It's just another bad book," Trump told the Daily Caller.

The Republican president said in a Twitter post that he cites in the book attributed to Defense Secretary James Mattis, the White House chief of staff, John Kelly, and others "were invented frauds, a scam for the public."

The book portrays Trump as prone to profane outbursts and impulsive decision making, painting an image of chaos that, according to Woodward, amounts to an "administrative coup" and a "nervous breakdown" of the executive branch.

According to the book, Trump told Mattis that he wanted to assassinate Assad after the Syrian president launched a chemical attack on civilians in April 2017.

Mattis told Trump that he would do well, but instead he developed a plan for a limited air strike that did not personally threaten Assad.

The famous reporter Bob Woodward includes the explosive anecdote in his new book, Fear: Trump in the White House

The famous reporter Bob Woodward includes the explosive anecdote in his new book, Fear: Trump in the White House

The famous reporter Bob Woodward includes the explosive anecdote in his new book, Fear: Trump in the White House

Mattis told associates after a separate incident that Trump acted as "a fifth or sixth grade student," according to the book.

In a statement on Tuesday, Mattis dismissed the book as "a brand of Washington's only literature" and said the dismissive words about Trump attributed to him "were never uttered by me or in my presence."

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the book was "nothing more than fabricated stories, many old disgruntled employees who were told to make the president look bad."

Nikki Haley, the United States ambassador to the United Nations, cast doubt on the Assad account.

"I have the pleasure of knowing these conversations (…) and not once did I hear the president talk about assassinating Assad," Haley told reporters on Tuesday.

Woodward gained national fame for his report on the Watergate scandal in the 1970s, and has since written a series of books that provide insights behind the scenes of presidential administrations and other Washington institutions.

For this book, Woodward spoke with senior advisers and other experts with the idea that he would not disclose how he obtained his information, the Post reported.

Among his other revelations, the former chief economic adviser, Gary Cohn, stole a letter from Trump's office that the president planned to sign to withdraw the United States from a trade agreement with South Korea.

The book portrays President Donald Trump (above) as prone to profane outbursts and impulsive decision making, painting a picture of chaos that according to Woodward amounts to an "administrative coup" and a "nervous collapse" of the executive branch

The book portrays President Donald Trump (above) as prone to profane outbursts and impulsive decision making, painting a picture of chaos that according to Woodward amounts to an "administrative coup" and a "nervous collapse" of the executive branch

The book portrays President Donald Trump (above) as prone to profane outbursts and impulsive decision making, painting a picture of chaos that according to Woodward amounts to an "administrative coup" and a "nervous collapse" of the executive branch

Cohn, who tried to curb Trump's protectionist impulses, also planned to eliminate a similar note that would have removed the United States from the North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada, Woodward wrote.

"I'll leave the newspaper on your desk," Cohn told another White House assistant, according to the book.

Trump said that did not happen.

"It's invented," he told the Daily Caller.

The United States continues to be a party to both trade agreements while negotiating new terms.

Other aides insulted Trump behind his back.

Kelly called Trump an "idiot" and said, "We're in Crazytown." … This is the worst job I have ever had. "

Trump treated the top advisors with contempt, the book says, telling Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who has already passed his prime and calling Attorney General Jeff Sessions "mentally retarded."

Trump insists that Bob Woodward's book interview request never reached the Oval Office

President Donald Trump complained on a recorded call that no one had contacted him about the interview request of veteran journalist Bob Woodward; then the grieving counselor, Kellyanne Conway, should have addressed him directly.

The Washington Post published a phone call recorded on August 14 between the famous author and the president shortly after the newspaper reported a copy of & # 39; Fear & # 39 ;, Woodward's next book on Trump.

Trump admits at one point during the call that a senator had passed along the request for a Woodward interview, but at other times he says he had no idea about it.

The call starts with Woodward, after alerting the president who was recording, regretting that the two could not connect and Trump saying that he wished he had known about the book, which was already appearing at the time of the call.

"She should have come to me," Trump said of President Kellyanne Conway's adviser (seen at the White House on August 29) during a conversation with Bob Woodward about an interview request that Trump says he was never told.

I never received a call. I never received a message, "the president said at the beginning." Who did you ask for talking to me? "

Woodward told her he had lunch with President Kellyanne Conway's advisor, where he pressured her to meet with Trump, prompting Trump to admonish his former campaign manager while she was in the room.

At one point during the swing, Conway entered the room where Trump was speaking, and he invited her to answer the call.

"You and I had a full lunch, Kellyanne … And you said you would answer me. Nothing, "Woodward told him.

Conway told Woodward: "Yes. So I did it. I introduced it to the people here who make those decisions, without naming names.

& # 39; Who are the people? & # 39; Woodward asked, but did not get an answer. At that moment, without answering, Conway abandoned the call and Trump went back up.

Trump then blamed Woodward for not having called him directly.

"But you never called me." It would have been nice, Bob, if you called me in my office, "Trump said.

"Kellyanne went with someone, but she did not come to me, and she should have come to me," Trump said.

Kelly, in remarks published by the White House, said he never called the president an idiot and called the story & # 39; total BS & # 39 ;.

Trump has become paranoid and anxious about an ongoing federal investigation into whether his campaign colluded with Russia in the alleged interference of Moscow in the 2016 presidential election, prompting assistants to compare Trump to former President Richard Nixon during the Watergate scandal, Woodward reported.

Trump's former lawyer, John Dowd, conducted a simulated interview with Trump to convince him that he would commit perjury if he agreed to speak with Special Advisor Robert Mueller, who leads the Russian investigation, the book says.

Trump did not speak with Woodward until the manuscript was complete, the newspaper reported.

& # 39; So I have another bad book that comes out. Big deal, "Trump told Woodward, according to a transcript of a telephone call published by the Post.

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