"It's never something I've supported": Scott Morrison rejects "gender quotas" in politics

Scott Morrison is working with Minsiter for Women Kelly O & # 39; Dwyer to create a & # 39; practical exercise & # 39; to get more women pre-selected at the Liberal party.

"It's never something I've supported": Scott Morrison rejects "gender quotas" in politics and says that women should be hired on the basis of their "own effort and credibility".

Australian Associated Press

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Wade Sellers for Daily Mail Australia

Scott Morrison says that gender quotas are not the way to allow women to advance in Parliament.

He also denied that women are underrepresented in the Liberal Party, and that gender quotas were never "something that I have supported," 9News reported.

Their comments come as the discussion continues on how the party can increase the number of women in its ranks, with women currently representing less than a quarter of federal liberal deputies.

Mr. Morrison noted: "As I believe in any political organization, it should be a matter of effort, effort and credibility … I do not think quotas are the way to remove obstacles."

"It's a matter of supporting women throughout the prescreening process … then, when they enter parliament, make sure you get the support they need to do the job," he continued.

Although he strongly disagrees with gender quotas, Mr. Morrison said that he is & # 39; & # 39; a matter of wing of the liberal organization & # 39; & # 39; that is brought or not.

However, Mr. Morrison is working with the Minister of Women, Kelly O & Dwyer, in a "hands-on exercise," similar to the training programs that helped a record number of liberal women to be shortlisted in the 1996 elections.

Scott Morrison is working with Minsiter for Women Kelly O & # 39; Dwyer to create a & # 39; practical exercise & # 39; to get more women pre-selected at the Liberal party.

Scott Morrison is working with Minsiter for Women Kelly O & # 39; Dwyer to create a & # 39; practical exercise & # 39; to get more women pre-selected at the Liberal party.

The prospect of adopting gender quotas first came to light when liberal leader Sussan Ley raised the idea for the first time with the backing of Marise Payne and Julie Bishop, who publicly deplored the low number of women in the party.

Mr. Morrison's ministry currently includes six women, up to five under Malcolm Turnbull, but adding a quarter of all the ministers with five more women in minor positions.

Julie Bishop has the public deplored the number of women in the Liberal Party, which currently includes only six women, with five more in lower positions

Julie Bishop has the public deplored the number of women in the Liberal Party, which currently includes only six women, with five more in lower positions

Julie Bishop has the public deplored the number of women in the Liberal Party, which currently includes only six women, with five more in lower positions

The president of the Council of Liberal Women, Helen Kroger, says it is time for the party to recognize that what has been done so far to recruit more women has not worked.

Former minister Craig Laundy became the first deputy of the male liberal party to support gender quotas, but ministers such as Simon Birmingham, Steve Ciobo and Josh Frydenberg are satisfied with the party's goal of a 50 percent female representation by 2025 .

The president of the Liberal Women's Council, Helen Kroger, says it's time for the party to recognize that what has been done so far to recruit more women has not worked.

The president of the Liberal Women's Council, Helen Kroger, says it's time for the party to recognize that what has been done so far to recruit more women has not worked.

The president of the Liberal Women's Council, Helen Kroger, says it's time for the party to recognize that what has been done so far to recruit more women has not worked.

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