Italy's deputy prime minister announces crackdown on Sunday

The movement of the right-wing government to tighten trade rules is an effort to defend family traditions, said Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio (pictured) on Sunday.

Italy PROHIBITS SHOPPING on Sunday: the new deputy prime minister announces energetic measures against trade laws, says they are "destroying families" & # 39; since stores could open on Saturday in 2012

  • Luigi Di Maio said that Sunday purchases will be banned in large shopping centers
  • Former Prime Minister Mario Monti liberalized the rules in an attempt to boost economic growth
  • The Catholic Church and the unions have opposed the most relaxed rules

Tim Stickings for Mailonline

Y
Reuters

The new Italian government will introduce a ban on Sunday purchases in large shopping centers before the end of the year.

The vice president of the government, Luigi Di Maio, said on Sunday that the right-wing government will move to toughen trade rules in an effort to defend family traditions.

Former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti liberalized Sunday's operations in 2012 in an attempt to stimulate economic growth during the eurozone crisis.

The movement of the right-wing government to tighten trade rules is an effort to defend family traditions, said Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio (pictured) on Sunday.

The movement of the right-wing government to tighten trade rules is an effort to defend family traditions, said Deputy Prime Minister Luigi Di Maio (pictured) on Sunday.

He faced pressure from the Roman Catholic Church and unions that said the country needed to maintain its traditional day of rest.

"This liberalization is, in fact, destroying Italian families," said Di Maio, who is the head of the 5-star anti-establishment movement.

"We have to start limiting the opening and closing times again," he said.

Earlier this year, Poland restricted purchases on Sunday as the conservative government in Warsaw went ahead with what it said was a return to Roman Catholic values.

Italian and Polish initiatives go against a slow liberalization of Sunday shopping hours across Europe, where retailers face the pressure of a boom in online shopping.

Small Italian merchants have long tried to overturn Monti's reform, saying that their businesses face unfair competition from large shopping centers.

Former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti (pictured) liberalized Sunday operations in 2012 in an attempt to stimulate economic growth during the eurozone crisis

Former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti (pictured) liberalized Sunday operations in 2012 in an attempt to stimulate economic growth during the eurozone crisis

Former Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti (pictured) liberalized Sunday operations in 2012 in an attempt to stimulate economic growth during the eurozone crisis

Ad

.