Italy's anti-immigrant leader urges Farage and Le Pen to join him

Last night's extreme right-wing leader Matteo Salvini (photo) called on Nigel Farage to join him in the European Parliament and form a new Eurosceptic supergroup

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Last night's extreme right-wing leader Matteo Salvini (photo) called on Nigel Farage to join him in the European Parliament and form a new Eurosceptic supergroup

The extreme right-wing leader of Italy called on Nigel Farage's Brexit party last night to join him in the European Parliament and form a new Eurosceptic supergroup.

Having fought at home with the largest number of places in Italy, Matteo Salvini said that his victory – along with that of Farage in Britain and Marine Le Pen in France – showed that Europe was changing.

Combined, the votes of Farage & # 39; s Brexit party, Salvini & # 39; s League party and National Rally of France yielded the largest number of Eurosceptics ever in the European Parliament.

During a dramatic night, it turned out that the centrist coalition that has dominated European politics for the past 40 years has been robbed in the European elections.

For decades, the two most important blocks have had a & # 39; Grand Coalition & # 39; but on Sunday evening it lost its majority and will have to rely on fringes.

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When he spoke in Rome yesterday, Mr. Salvini promised to continue the indictment with "even more energy, passion and dedication."

He added: “Not only is the League the top game in Italy, Marine Le Pen is the top game in France, Nigel Farage is the top game in the UK. So Italy, France, the UK, it is a sign of a Europe that is changing. & # 39;

He said he was counting on MEPs from the Brexit party to join his Europe of Nations and Freedom (ENF) group to boost his number to 150 and change the European established order. Many believe he faces an upward struggle to reach that figure, but yesterday he insisted that it was possible & # 39; anyone can overcome jealousy, sympathies and dislikes & # 39 ;.

The group had only 36 at the end of the last parliamentary term and Mr Farage was in a separate group, the Europe of freedom and the Direct Democracy Group.

Mr Salvini would also need the right-wing Fidesz party of Hungarian leader Viktor Orban to leave the current group and join other extreme right-wing parties in Germany, the Czech Republic, Finland, Sweden, Denmark and Spain.

Nigel Farage

Nigel Farage

Marine Le Pen

Marine Le Pen

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Having gone home with the largest number of seats in Italy, Matteo Salvini said his victory – along with Nigel Farage (left) in Britain and Marine Le Pen (right) in France – showed that Europe was changing

In addition, MEPs would be needed from the Polish law and justice party, which has made a profit, but they have previously refused to join Mr Salvini's coalition.

Mr Farage has not yet ruled out becoming a member of Mr Salvini, but it is thought that he is unlikely to do so because he founded the Brexit party, partly to escape the increasingly extremist direction of Ukip.

It is also thought that some of its members, who come from the left, are against joining a right-wing alliance. Mr. Farage has in the past ruled out joining forces with Miss Le Pen.

Yesterday a Brexit party spokesperson said it was too early to draw conclusions about which parties it would work with.

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He added, however, that because the party had the largest delegation of MEPs – 29 from Mr Salvini & 28 and Miss Le Pen 22 – it was more a question of & # 39; other people who join us & # 39 ;. The Brexit party has the joint highest number of MEPs of all parties in Europe.

This diagram shows the dominance of the Brexit party everywhere except London and Scotland

This diagram shows the dominance of the Brexit party everywhere except London and Scotland

This diagram shows the dominance of the Brexit party everywhere except London and Scotland

Following yesterday's official statement of results, Parliament now has around 184 eurosceptic and pro-reform MEPs as Mr Orban, compared to 155 in the last 2014 elections.

The increase helped for 40 years break the majority of the two largest center-right and center-left groups of parties. Benefits for the Greens and Liberals also contributed to the European People's Party (EPP) and Socialists and Democrats (S&D) losing 87 seats and their majority, allowing them to dominate since 1979. A group needs at least 376 seats to retain a majority, so although 150 seats would not give a majority to Mr Salvini's ENF group, it could be more difficult for the major parties to adopt laws.

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It triggers the start of weeks of cow trade between parties about who joins forces and creates a majority, who will determine who gets the best jobs from the block.

This includes the position of President of the European Commission when the term of Jean-Claude Juncker ends in November. Yesterday, the right hand of Mr Juncker, Secretary General of the EU Commission Martin Selmayr, suggested that the reign of his boss could be extended well into the new year because of the fragmented election result and the bitter struggle over who will replace him, who likely to follow.

The leader of the party with the largest number of seats would normally assume the role of President of the European Commission. Currently, this is EPP leader Manfred Weber, a German who is supported by Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor.

But the absence of an absolute majority means that his candidacy is far from certain and that French President Emmanuel Macron, who has stimulated liberal numbers in parliament, is known to be Michel Barnier, the EU's chief Brexit negotiator, the role.

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