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Baghdadi

I was in New York the night President Barack Obama announced that Navy SEALs had killed Osama bin Laden.

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Obama hated republicans at the time, but partisan rivalry was reserved for a moment of true, united joy over the death of the world's most wanted terrorist.

People of all political tendencies took to the streets to "USA!" US! & # 39; When they celebrated the creepy demise of the bad Al Qaida leader in a shooting in Pakistan.

It didn't matter how you voted, what mattered was that the man who had invented 9/11 was finally made to pay for his vile crimes.

It was a great day for America and for the world.

Baghdadi

Bin Laden

Bin Laden

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America was united in triumph when the brain of 9/11 – Osama Bin Laden (top right) was killed under the Obama administration. But yesterday, when the founder and leader of ISIS Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi (top left) was greeted by President Trump when he attended a World Series competition.

Yesterday was another of those days.

Some even claim that it was an even bigger day.

Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi was the founder and leader of ISIS, a terrorist group that makes Al Qaeda look like choir boys.

For five years, after declaring the Islamic State a global caliphate, Baghdadi presided over one of the most cruel, bad periods of unacceptable terrorist activity in modern history.

Both administrations released photos while the presidents and their military leaders watched how both terrorist leaders were killed in American strikes

Both administrations released photos while the presidents and their military leaders watched how both terrorist leaders were killed in American strikes

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Both administrations released photos while the presidents and their military leaders watched how both terrorist leaders were killed in American strikes

His followers burned victims alive in cages or drowned them slowly. They threw gays from rooftops and decapitated others on videos that they then broadcast online.

They executed 13 teenage boys in Iraq with machine guns because they watched a football match on TV.

They shot, bombed suicide, and massacred all the rival Shia Muslims they could find in a ruthless, insane attempt to ethnically clean them off the planet.

They kill anyone who tried to leave his caliphate, or those whom they found "ineffective in combat."

His followers burned the victims alive in cages - such as the Jordanian pilot Moaz al-Kasasbeh above - or drowned them slowly. They threw gays from rooftops and decapitated others on videos that they then broadcast online.
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His followers burned the victims alive in cages - such as the Jordanian pilot Moaz al-Kasasbeh above - or drowned them slowly. They threw gays from rooftops and decapitated others on videos that they then broadcast online.

His followers burned the victims alive in cages – such as the Jordanian pilot Moaz al-Kasasbeh above – or drowned them slowly. They threw gays from rooftops and decapitated others on videos that they then broadcast online.

They abducted thousands of women, especially Kurds or Yazidis, and sold them as sex slaves or forced them to marry ISIS hunters and be their sex slaves. Many were tortured or killed themselves to escape the torment.

They traded human organs that they had taken from living prisoners and hostages, including children.

They used brainwashed children as young as six as first-line shields.

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As the terrible tentacles of Baghdadi spread throughout the world, fueled by constant ISIS propaganda on the Internet, the scale and cruelty of attacks against civilians deteriorated.

In January 2015, ISIS terrorists, armed with assault rifles, stormed the Parisian offices of the satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, killing 12 people.

This is the moment when Charlie Hebdo terrorists shot an injured policeman during an attack on a satirical magazine - shooting him up close while holding his hands up

This is the moment when Charlie Hebdo terrorists shot an injured policeman during an attack on a satirical magazine - shooting him up close while holding his hands up

This is the moment when Charlie Hebdo terrorists shot an injured policeman during an attack on a satirical magazine – shooting him up close while holding his hands up

A few months later, ISIS carried out coordinated attacks in the same city in a football stadium, cafes and the Bataclan concert hall – killing 130 people and 350 injured.

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In 2016, ISIS claimed responsibility when a man in a big truck on Bastille Day drove through a crowd in Nice, France, killed 84 and wounded 330.

A year later, an ISIS-inspired suicide bomber attacked an Ariana Grande pop concert in Manchester, England, killing 22 predominantly young girls and injuring another 59.

French firefighters help an injured person near the Bataclan concert hall after fatal shootings in Paris, France, November 13, 2015

French firefighters help an injured person near the Bataclan concert hall after fatal shootings in Paris, France, November 13, 2015

French firefighters help an injured person near the Bataclan concert hall after fatal shootings in Paris, France, November 13, 2015

All this was done on the Baghdadi watch.

He was the boss, the driving force, the brain behind barbarism.

So yesterday was a really great day for America and the world.

It was the day that this monster no longer lived to continue his disgusting rule of unimaginable horror and depravity.

It should have been a day that reunited all Americans, even in these hyperpartisan times.

But last night I started the World Series baseball game in Washington D.C. to see the crowd fascinate their president.

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It was amazing to see: thousands of Americans cheered and spotted President Trump, the man who had just successfully ordered the death of Baghdadi.

The shock I felt had nothing to do with a group of D.C. people drinking Trump; The capital of America is the most intense Trump-disgusting place in the country (90% voted for Hillary in 2016) and for many of his extremely liberal residents, captivating him is a 24/7 obsession.

It is shocking that thousands of Americans cheerfully hunted and mocked President Trump, the man who had just successfully ordered the death of Baghdadi when he attended the World Series competition in Washington yesterday (see above)

It is shocking that thousands of Americans cheerfully hunted and mocked President Trump, the man who had just successfully ordered the death of Baghdadi when he attended the World Series competition in Washington yesterday (see above)

It is shocking that thousands of Americans cheerfully hunted and mocked President Trump, the man who had just successfully ordered the death of Baghdadi when he attended the World Series competition in Washington yesterday (see above)

No, the shock I felt was related to the timing of this booing.

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Frankly, whatever you think of Trump, it makes me believe that every American would choose to abuse his president yesterday.

There are many legitimate reasons for not liking him.

He is comfortably the most divisive and polarizing president in the modern history of the United States, a man whose inflammatory rhetoric has contributed much, although by no means all, to the toxicity of today's American political discourse.

And his potentially unassailable behavior against the "quid pro quo" scandal in Ukraine, and his scandalous decision to throw American allies under the bus in Syria, have made him all the less popular right now.

Even the way he announced the news of Baghdadi's death was typically Trumpian and, for many of his critics, "non-presidential."

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From his glowing bombast and security-threatening over-sharing about the raid, to his false claim that he alone had previously warned of the dangers of Bin Laden and his shockingly inappropriate book plug, it was an unnecessary self-glorifying execution Trump had to say was: & # 39; I recommended a successful mission to & # 39; kill the world's most dangerous terrorist & # 39 ;.

That amazing fact alone is something that can win elections.

He didn't need all the extra off-script blather, although I personally wanted to hear the bloody details of the last moments of Baghdadi.

Nothing begets a man more than the way of his death, and now the whole world knows that Baghdadi was a snarling little coward dragging three of his own poor children to their death in a desperate attempt to save himself.

So President Trump never helps himself, and there are many completely legitimate criticisms.

BUT, and I think it's a big "BUT," last night wasn't the time to do it.

Last night was a time for America to set aside its insanely cruel partisan quarrel and just celebrate the downfall of the worst person on planet Earth.

That's not like some of his enemies want you to believe, Donald Trump.

It was Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi.

His death is a huge boost for the American in his war against terrorism.

It cuts off the head of ISIS when its entire existence is about to collapse.

It is no exaggeration to say that this could speed up the end of ISIS altogether, although we can certainly expect some form of reprisal after the death of Baghdadi, as the few remaining ISIS hunters are desperately trying to support.

So regardless of your opinion about Trump, and I have been just as critical of him in recent weeks, this was a time to praise him for taking the courageous, courageous decision to order a dangerous mission that successfully led the leader from ISIS.

Of course, most of the praise should go to the heroic special forces who carried out the mission, and the much-maligned – not least by Trump – American intelligence agencies who helped track Baghdadi.

But Trump still deserves much praise for ordering the operation. If it had failed, Baghdadi would have escaped and American troops would have been killed, it would have been a disaster for America and for him.

I would not say, as Trump predictably did, that it was a greater moment than the death of Bin Laden, given how uniquely emotional and vengeful Americans felt comprehensible after 9/11, but it was certainly just as important.

So for Americans to use this moment to farm their president and sing, "Lock him up!" Seems rude, wrong and unpatriotic.

Yes, I know that Trump encourages his own supporters to do this to all of his basic meetings at Hillary Clinton.

But just because he did it wrong to do what he is does not make it right for him to do it on such an important day.

In fact, it makes it unpatriotic and shameful.

When Bin Laden was killed, the images of Americans who met in joy went around the world and were a powerful symbol of unity.

Today, the only images people will see are Americans boosting their president for helping kill the leader of ISIS.

Yes, it was a bad look for Trump.

But it's a much worse look for America.

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